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Business

Compensation for Photographers

ASMP's Strictly Business - 14 hours 13 min ago

[by Eugene Mopsik]

Throughout my 32 year career as a shooter, the business proposition was very stable and easy to grasp. Prospect for work, submit an estimate, shoot a job, edit, deliver selects with rights assignment, client uses and returns work within the limits of the rights assignment. Stock was a means to gain additional value from the secondary licensing of images from the shoot, again within the limits of the rights assignment.

Surely this model has changed and continues to change. While copyright law gives the photographer the rights to his images at the moment they are fixed in a tangible form, most client agreements today include such a broad array of rights that there is little left for the photographer to market. Where previously images might have appeared in one medium – primarily print for advertising or collateral – they now appear in multiple formats and in a number of mediums or platforms.

Additionally, there is increased competition from crowd-sourced images and images crated by talented amateurs made available by Web based distribution systems. While the demand for images has grown, the fees paid have not with the exception of the highest end of rights managed photography. So where does the professional fit in? What do we have to offer?

I believe that one key to success is the ability to differentiate yourself from the crowd. Create a brand. This may be accomplished through unique technique, better service, or social media. What do you do better than anyone else in your market? Make working with you enjoyable. Create engagement through shared experience. Emphasize your value. Think like a client, not a photographer. What will make a client take a chance on giving you an assignment?

Another key is to seek markets where there is an ongoing need for unique images with higher barriers to entry either due to technical or production issues. I moved away from corporate work when the market became flooded with emerging photographers. I moved into the heavy industrial market that required more pre and post production and greater capitalization due to the scope of the assignments.

For some, the new revenue streams are coming not from their photography but from their fan base or eyeballs. This is the new currency – followers. These eyeballs have value to sponsors who are willing to pay for your endorsements – which come in the soft form of blog post entries, Likes, mentions in your Facebook and Twitter posts, etc.

The truth today is that there is no one path to success and simple reliance on assignments will not work for everyone. Ultimately, multiple income streams are needed now more than ever.

Since 2003, Eugene Mopsik has led the ASMP as its Executive Director.  For many years before that, Gene was an active member of ASMP’s board in a number of capacities including a term as its President in 2000/01. Gene currently serves on the boards of the Brooks Institute, the Eddie Adams Workshop and the PLUS (Picture Licensing Universal System) Coalition, and on the Advisory Board of the Young Photographers Alliance (YPA). Prior to his position at ASMP, his career was as a successful Philadelphia corporate/industrial photographer having graduated from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

The Daily Edit – Stan Evans: Red Bull

A Photo Editor's Blog - Tue, 09/30/2014 - 9:52am

Red Bull /Olympic Hopefuls

Creative Directors: Ryan Snyder, Ilana Taub
Photo Editor: Marv Watson
Photography: Stan Evans
Photo Assistants: West Coast: Cory Stefffen/ East Coast: Will Crakes
Hair: / MUA/ Laura Fey
Styling: Stan Evans/ Laura Fey

 

Screen shot 2014-09-29 at 5.21.59 PM

(Grete Elaissen) Grete is the best all around female skier I’ve ever seen but he truth is I’m always excited to bring out here feminine side and show her in another light. 99.9% of the time she’s in a helmet or ski gear but for this moment I got her to wear a dress. Originally she wasn’t quite feeling it (mainly because of the cold) but I said when you see the image that’s in my head. This will be the photo you show your grand kids to remind them how beautiful you were.

Screen shot 2014-09-29 at 5.22.13 PM(Louie Vito)  ​Louie is probable the best athlete I’ve ever shot. He is always early, always cracking jokes, always making people feel at home which was the beauty of this shoot. I got to turn Louie into someone else besides “Mr. Nice Guy”. I love the camera for the simple fact that you can take a person’s persona and flip it on it’s head.

Screen shot 2014-09-29 at 5.22.32 PM(Bobby Brown) I’d never met Bobby before but he was a consummate pro. He cared just as much about the portrait process as the action photos which is rare for an action sports athlete.

Screen shot 2014-09-29 at 5.22.43 PM(Greg Bretz) Greg was pretty much in a media sponsor frenzy when I shot these photos. He looked to be the first lock on the Olympic Halfpipe selection and you could tell he had alot of interviews on his plate. Pretty much the last thing you want to hear as a snowboarder is “someguy from new york” is here to take your photo. That usually equates to “guy in the sky” and missed grabbed photos with poor style. Two things the core audience of snowboarding hates.  I try to stay true to my roots and remember where I came from so I made it quick for Greg and got these shots in 2 takes. I saw Greg at breakfast later that week told him by the way  I shot snowboarding for 15+ years and I grew up in Alaska.

Screen shot 2014-09-29 at 5.22.51 PM(Arielle Gold) ​For this shot I literally introduced myself on the side of the halfpipe. “Hi I’m Stan Evans and I’m here to shoot your portrait for Red Bull!”  This was during practice for the final  so I would literally caught her hiking to do another run. I was actually lined up on the wrong wall for her action shot and practice ended so I hustled back up at night time (about 10 degrees) and got the action portion of her then.

Screen shot 2014-09-29 at 5.22.58 PM(Nick Goepper) Sometime in all the seriousness of preparing for the the olympics we forget these are kids. So for Nick’s shoot it was all about fun. It was pretty fun convincing him to do a cartwheel in ski boots and he had the biggest grin when I asked him to backflip with my camera. He asked,  “what happens if i wreck?”  I told him I have insurance…. but don’t wreck. (it’s a canon 5d mark II in his hand that I remote triggered from the ground) If you look closely you can see me bottom left.

Heidi: Had you pitched Red Bull projects previously? Or was this the first opened assignment with them?
Stan: Yes, here’s a list of what I had pitched and executed for them:
Grete Eliassen Movie: “Say My Name”
Travis Rice portraits: “That’s it, That’s All”, Mainstream Media ( below )

Screen Shot 2014-09-24 at 10.51.20 AMScreen shot 2014-09-29 at 8.43.42 PM Screen shot 2014-09-29 at 8.43.55 PM
Edwin De La Rosa:  BMX Portraits ( below )

Screen shot 2014-09-29 at 5.50.36 PM Screen shot 2014-09-29 at 5.50.50 PM Screen shot 2014-09-29 at 5.51.01 PM

 

For Travis Rice, “That It, That’s ‘s All”  I shot test samples and had meetings with Travis, Brainfarm Producers and Red Bull, the goal was to shoot for a mainstream audience so it wasn’t as much about his performance on a snowboard as it was building a compelling character.

 

The pitch for Grete’s movie actually took about 8 months. It ended up being a two year project We created a teaser and photos compiled of Grete adventures of what logged the first year and coordinated it with outlets that had already expressed interests in the project and projected views. Grete, Adam Bebout, her regional athlete Manger and I flew down to Red Bull and we pitched in person. They warmed up to it a bit but what took it over the top was the hip jump idea. It was something that differentiated it from other female ski projects and opened the appeal to a larger audience. The general public might not understand skiing but the idea that a woman could fly 30+ feet in the air and create a world record was something a lot of people could be excited about.
Here’s a few pages from the Virulence Report from my office which was for interest in the movie before hand. After Grete’s hip jump/world record the impressions were 33 million the first month by Red Bull’s analytics team.

Screen shot 2014-09-29 at 6.29.55 PM Screen shot 2014-09-29 at 6.30.09 PM

 

 

What were the directives from the brand?
Red Bull wanted portraits that were compelling to mainstream media but could still live within endemic media. Logo placement is always imperative but I try to blend it subtly. It was nice because action was secondary but I think being able to handle both sides of the spectrum was a large selling point for them.

My guess is you’re also an athlete adventurer. How does that play into your work?
I love the outdoors and being a part of the action but being snowboard photographer started to take it’s toll. I actually was in a car accident on my way to filming a part of Grete’s movie. I chipped off a piece of bone in my kneecap and after 6 knee surgeries I was ready to take a different direction so I started focusing on portraits. If anything I’ve probably toned it down a bit. It lets me see more of the quiet moments between the action and helps humanize people. I still love risky jobs and exploring in that I connect with the subjects because they realize I know what they are going through and as a photographer, I’m trying to make them look their absolute best.
The biggest oxymoron is being on a set in NYC where people act as if something goes wrong someone might die as opposed to being on the side of a mountain in Alaska where someone actually could die.
For example, before Kevin Pearce there was Timmy Ostler. Tim was an amazing snowboarder that I was shooting at Park City. He had a freak fall in the halfpipe, was heli-evaced and consequently paralyzed from the waist down. Those moments change you. I’m not trying to be a downer but those moments make you realize what’s at stake on set or in the studio. I’m so thankful I get to do what I do, and I try to remember that, as well as remind those around me. Positivity and being happy to be there are a huge part of my shoots because in the back of my mind I realize, this can all be taken away in an instant.

What was the biggest hurdle with the assignment?
Weather is always a factor. For the Grand Prix it snowed ton during qualifiers and people could barely get speed for jumps. It made for pretty lackluster action and inopportune for some of the locations I had scouted. I usually try to have a plan B – get creative and adapt. Grete’s location was really the only specific parameter I had to nail. Schedule was probably the other, many of the athletes had overlapping practice or events, other sponsor commitments and competing with television and other media outlets . But sometimes that worked out. I met one of the hosts for NBC and showed him some of the photos of Louie. They ended up using them in a “Road to Sochi” spot so turnaround was quick and I caught a lucky break.

How long did you spend with the athletes in order to capture the non action side of them?
Sometimes 5 – 10 minutes, sometimes days.
I had a hard time tracking down Arielle Gold. I literally saw her at the halfpipe, introduced myself, shot her portrait and action on the spot. For Louie we actually talked quite a bit and he invited me to his home. I was immersed in his training regimen. I ate what he ate. Woke up when he did and would get the gym before him to set up. It made for an amazing experience and it shows in the photos. We ended up having a great spread of photos of everything he did but the edit focused on his physique.
Grete is beautiful woman and was probably the most challenging yet rewarding to shoot. I wanted her to look feminine and have the environment and props tell the story. She really is standing in the woods in 15 degrees with a pair of skis in a dress. That’s amazing trust.
Bobby Brown was probably my favorite though. I had him for about 45 mins. Once he came on set he was invested. He was so curious about the process and how he could help make the shot better. Never looked at his watch, never told me he had places to be. A consummate pro – I was really happy he fought through some injuries and made the Olympic team… I’m a Bobby Brown fan for life.

Categories: Business

The Future of Work

ASMP's Strictly Business - Tue, 09/30/2014 - 12:02am

[Tom Kennedy]

All visual communicators are subject presently to the twin disruptors of technology and digital media that have been constants for the past two decades. These disruptors have radically altered both the supply and demand sides of the economic equation and any consideration of future monetization strategies has to begin here.

For most of the 20th century, professional photographers built their business models on the notion of scarcity on the supply side and abundance on the demand side. Publishing opportunities existed in abundance, and professional visual communicators providing images had various barriers working in their favor that separated their work from that of amateurs.

Today, economic realities have totally flipped the equation. We are awash in an ever-rising tide of images daily, with technology continuously blurring the lines separating amateur and professional visions. On the demand side, the disruption of mainstream media has drastically altered the number of publications and organizations seeking professional images. As a result, a seismic rebalancing is occurring in the marketplace.

Immediately, I think professional photographers need to see themselves as visual solutions providers who go well beyond being image providers for clients. While that activity still matters, professionals need to be service providers establishing ongoing, long-term relationships that enable them to charge recurring fees for services. They need to sit on the same side of the table as their clients, and be seen as indispensible architects of messaging in a language that is increasingly spoken globally, thanks in part to technology.

Colleagues need to heed an idea I first ran across in an article in The Economist. It was quoting a McKinsey Global Institute quarterly report from 2012.

In it, the report’s authors broke down the future of work into three categories: interactions, transactions, and production. Paraphrasing the authors, the highest value work in the future will be based on the interaction economy where high-skilled talent (still relatively small in absolute numbers) would command value due to their ability to do complex problem-solving, and provide knowledge gained from experience that would offer context for the work at hand to be done.

On the other hand, production, described as the work of converting physical materials into finished goods, was seen by the authors as commanding the lowest rate of return in the future. While they were addressing manufacturing with that example, I immediately thought of media companies viewing photography in that light, particularly with the glut of amateur imagery now readily available as a constant. Transactions, such as data processing or image processing, that can be made more efficient through automation were seen as in the middle as a valued activity.

For me, this added urgency to the idea that visual communicators need to convey clearly that their expertise and skills go beyond making a commodity product. Rather, they offer a value proposition as experts with proficiency in their use of a creative vision to solve business problems, akin to a lawyer handling legal matters. Only then can a new monetization strategy more effectively address new market realities.

Tom Kennedy is an independent consultant coaching and mentoring individual photographers, while also working with various organizations to train individuals and teams on multimedia story creation, production, publication and distribution strategies for digital platforms, and enhancing creativity. He also regularly teaches at Universities and multimedia conferences. He has created, directed, and edited visual journalism projects that have earned Pulitzer Prizes, as well as EMMY, Peabody, and Edward R. Murrow awards.  He can be reached at kennedymedia@gmail.com.

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

Monetizing Your Work

ASMP's Strictly Business - Tue, 09/30/2014 - 12:01am

Earning a living in a world where everyone has a camera requires a willingness to reexamine and reinvent how you monetize your work.  This week, we offer a mix of perspectives from both regular and guest contributors exploring the future of compensation for photographers.  It’s a topic worthy of deep discussion and we hope you’ll join us on October 21 for ASMP’s evolution/revolution webinar, Getting Paid:Compensation for Photographers in the 21st Century with ASMP Executive Director, Eugene Mopsik, as well. ~ Judy Herrmann, Editor

 

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

US Forest Service Wild Land Photo Permit Kerfuffle

A Photo Editor's Blog - Mon, 09/29/2014 - 10:13am

If you want to comment on the “Directive for Commercial Filming in Wilderness; Special Uses Administration” that was widely reported to allow charging people $1500 to take photos on federal wild lands you can do so here (deadline extended to Dec. 3):

https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2014/09/04/2014-21093/proposed-directive-for-commercial-filming-in-wilderness-special-uses-administration

I can’t make heads or tails of the directive pasted below but on Friday the Washington Post reported:

After receiving complaints about a proposal to require photographers to have a permit to shoot on federal wild lands, the U.S. Forest Service says it will make some changes to ensure it doesn’t violate First Amendment rights.

And that the news media and private individuals will not be asked to apply for a permit to take pictures.

—————

Directive for Commercial Filming in Wilderness; Special Uses Administration

This Notice document was issued by the Forest Service (FS)

Action

Notice of proposed directive; request for public comment.

Summary

The Forest Service proposes to incorporate interim directive (ID) 2709.11-2013.1 into Forest Service Handbook (FSH) 2709.11, chapter 40 to make permanent guidance for the evaluation of proposals for still photography and commercial filming on National Forest System Lands. The proposed amendment would address the establishment of consistent national criteria to evaluate requests for special use permits on National Forest System (NFS) lands. Specifically, this policy provides the criteria used to evaluate request for special use permits related to still photography and commercial filming in congressionally designated wilderness areas. Public comment is invited and will be considered in the development of the final directive.

Dates

Comments must be received in writing on or before November 3, 2014 to be assured of consideration.

Addresses

Submit comments electronically by following the instructions at the federal eRulemaking portal at http://www.regulation.gov or submit comments via fax to 703-605-5131 or 703-605-5106. Please identify faxed comments by including “Commercial Filming in Wilderness” on the cover sheet or first page. Comments may also be submitted via mail to Commercial Filming in Wilderness, USDA, Forest Service, Attn: Wilderness & Wild and Scenic Rivers (WWSR), 201 14th Street SW., Mailstop Code: 1124, Washington, DC 20250-1124. Email comments may be sent to: reply_lands@fs.fed.us. If comments are submitted electronically, duplicate comments should not be sent by mail. Hand-delivered comments will not be accepted and receipt of comments cannot be confirmed. Please restrict comments to issues pertinent to the proposed directive, explain the reasons for any recommended changes, and, where possible, reference the specific section and wording being addressed.

All comments, including names and addresses when provided, will be placed in the record and be made available for public inspection and copying. The public may inspect the comments received at the USDA Forest Service Headquarters, Sidney R. Yates Federal Building, 201 14th Street SW., Washington, DC, in the Office of the Director, WWSR, 5th Floor South, during normal business hours. Visitors are encouraged to call ahead to 202-644-4862 to facilitate entry to the building.

For Further Information Contact

Elwood York, WWSR, at 202-649-1727.

Individuals who use telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339 between 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday.

Supplementary Information

1. Background and Need for the Proposed Directive

The proposed directive is necessary for the Forest Service to issue and administer special use authorizations that will allow the public to use and occupy National Forest System (NFS) lands for still photography and commercial filming in wilderness. The proposed directive FSH 2709.11, chapter 40, is currently issued as the third consecutive interim directive (ID) which is set to expire in October 2014. The previous directive addressed still photography in wilderness and did not provide adequate guidance to review commercial filming in wilderness permit proposals. The notice and comments are collected and used by Forest Service officials, unless otherwise noted, to ensure the use of NFS lands are authorized, in the public interest, and compatible with the Agency’s mission and/or record authorization of use granted by appropriate Forest Service officials.

2. Overview of Proposed Directive, FSH 2709.11, Chapter 40

The Forest Service is requesting public input with respect to Agency policy. Our intent with the issuance of this notice of proposed directive is to consider such input and, as appropriate, incorporate it into future policy. Certain suggestions, whether due to legislative or other limitations, may not be implemented through Agency policy, and we wish for the public to understand that as well.

The current language has been in place for 48 months. This proposal would make permanent guidelines for the acceptance and denial for still photography and commercial filming permits in congressionally designated wilderness areas.

Section 45.1c—Evaluation of Proposals

This proposed section would include criteria in addition to that of still photography to incorporate commercial filming activities. Furthermore, the Agency is proposing to clarify when a special use permit may be issued to authorize the use of NFS lands if the proposed activity, other than noncommercial still photography would be in a congressionally designated wilderness area.

The proposed directive for FSH 2709.11, chapter 40, section 45.1c is as follows:

45.1C—EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS

A special use permit may be issued (when required by sections 45.1a and 45.2a) to authorize the use of National Forest System lands for still photography or commercial filming when the proposed activity:

1. Meets the screening criteria in 36 CFR 251.54(e);

2. Would not cause unacceptable resource damage;

3. Would not unreasonably disrupt the public’s use and enjoyment of the site where the activity would occur;

4. Would not pose a public health and safety risk; and

5. Meets the following additional criteria, if the proposed activity, other than noncommercial still photography (36 CFR 251.51), would be in a congressionally designated wilderness area:

a. Has a primary objective of dissemination of information about the use and enjoyment of wilderness or its ecological, geological, or other features of scientific, educational, scenic, or historical value (16 U.S.C. 1131(a) and (b));

b. Would preserve the wilderness character of the area proposed for use, for example, would leave it untrammeled, natural, and undeveloped and would preserve opportunities for solitude or a primitive and unconfined type of recreation (16 U.S.C. 1131(a));

c. Is wilderness-dependent, for example, a location within a wilderness area is identified for the proposed activity and there are no suitable locations outside of a wilderness area (16 U.S.C. 1133(d)(6));

d. Would not involve use of a motor vehicle, motorboat, or motorized equipment, including landing of aircraft, unless authorized by the enabling legislation for the wilderness area (36 CFR 261.18(a) and (c));

e. Would not involve the use of mechanical transport, such as a hang glider or bicycle, unless authorized by the enabling legislation for the wilderness area (36 CFR 261.18(b));

f. Would not violate any applicable order (36 CFR 261.57); and

g. Would not advertise any product or service (16 U.S.C. 1133(c)).

3. Regulatory Certifications

Environmental Impact
The proposed directive is incorporating Interim Directive FSH 2709.11, chapter 40, section 45.51b into its parent text at section 45.1c. It will provide guidelines for accepting and denying still photography and commercial filming applications in congressionally designated wilderness areas. Agency regulations at 35 CFR 220.6(d)(2) (73 FR 43093) exclude from documentation in an environmental assessment or impact statement “rules, regulations, or policies to establishService-wide administrative procedures, program processes, or instructions.” The Agency has concluded that this directive falls within this category of actions and that no extraordinary circumstances exist which would require preparation of an environment assessment or environmental impact statement.

Regulatory Impact
The proposed directive has been reviewed under USDA procedures and Executive Order 12866 on regulatory planning and review. It has been determined that this is not an economically significant action. This action will not have an annual effect of $100 million or more on the economy, nor will it adversely affect productivity, competition, jobs, the environment, public health and safety, or State or local governments. This proposed directive will not interfere with an action taken or planned by another agency, nor will it raise new legal or policy issues. Finally the proposed directive will not alter the budgetary impact of entitlement, grant, user fee, or loan programs or the rights and obligations of beneficiaries of those programs.
The proposed directive has been considered in light of Executive Order 13272 regarding proper consideration of small entities and the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996 (SBREFA), which amended the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.). A small entity flexibility assessment has determined that this action will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities as defined by SBREFA. This proposed directive focuses on National Forest System special use permits regarding still photography and commercial filming in congressionally designated wilderness areas.
Federalism

The Agency has considered this directive under the requirements of Executive Order 13132 on federalism and has determined that the proposed directive conforms with the federalism principles set out in this Executive Order; will not impose any compliance costs on the states; and will not have substantial direct effects on the States, the relationship between the Federal Government and the States, or the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. Therefore, the Agency has determined that no further assessment of federalism implications is necessary.

Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal Governments
In conjunction with Executive Order 13175, entitled “Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments” the Agency invited Tribes to consult on the proposed directive prior to review and comment by the general public starting November 29, 2013, and ending on April 30, 2014. The consultation process was initiated through written instructions from the Deputy Chief for the National Forest System to the Regional Foresters and subsequently to the Forest Supervisors.
Tribes were provided 120 days to discuss the proposed policy. During that time, Tribal Liaisons and Line Officers were available to review the proposed directive and answer Tribal concerns.

Through this Tribal consultation, the Agency has assessed the impact of this proposed directive on Indian Tribes and determined that it does not have substantial direct or unique effects on Indian Tribes, on the relationship between the Federal Government and Indian Tribes, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities between the Federal Government and Indian Tribes.
The Agency has also determined that the directive does not impose substantial direct compliance costs on Indian tribal governments or preempt tribal law.

No Taking Implications
The Agency has analyzed the proposed directive in accordance with the principles and criteria contained in Executive Order 12630. The Agency has determined that the proposed directive does not pose the risk of taking private property.

Civil Justice Reform
The directive has been reviewed under Executive Order 12988 of February 7th, 1996, “Civil Justice Reform”. At the time of adoption of the directives, (1) all State and local laws and regulations that conflict with the directives or that impede full implementation of the directives were not preempted; (2) no retroactive effect was given to the directives; and (3) administrative proceedings are not required before parties can file suit in court to challenge its provisions.

Unfunded Mandates
Pursuant to Title II of the Unfunded Mandate Reform Act of 1995, (2 U.S.C. 1531-1538) the Agency has assessed the effects of the proposed directive on State, local and Tribal governments and the private sector. Therefore a statement under section 202 of the act is not required.

Energy Effects
The Agency has reviewed the proposed directive under Executive Order 13211 of May 18, 2001, “Actions Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use.” The Agency has determined that the directive does not constitute a significant energy action as defined in the Executive Order.

Controlling Paperwork Burdens on the Public
The directive does not contain any additional record keeping or reporting requirements or other information collection requirements as defined in 5 CFR part 1320 that are not already required by law or not already approved for use and, therefore, imposes no additional paperwork burden on the public. Accordingly, the review provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et al.) and its implementing regulations at 5 CFR part 1320 do not apply.

Categories: Business

Invest in Yourself

ASMP's Strictly Business - Mon, 09/29/2014 - 12:01am

Earning a living in a world where everyone has a camera means staying at the top of your game.  Take advantage of these great opportunities to gain new skills and knowledge for free or with dramatic price reductions for ASMP Members.  Join us:

e-Learning_eNewsReaching New Heights with UAV Photography
Class 1: available on demand
Class 2: Today, Monday 9/29

1:00 – 2:00 pm EDT / 10:00 – 11:00 PDT

It’s not too late to register for ASMP’s new online learning course, which covers how to purchase, configure, control and safely operate the right UAV device for your needs.  Check out the recording for the free introductory class, Is UAV Photography Right for You?, and register for the full course to get access to the on-demand recording of the first class and attend the remaining live classes. www.asmp.org/e-learning/UAV.

• • •

BaU_logo4blogYou Got the Call, Now What?
with Cristopher Lapp
Wednesday, October 15, 2014
1:00 – 2:00 pm EDT / 10:00 – 11:00 am PDT

Acclaimed fashion photographer Cristopher Lapp walks you through how he developed the budget for a recent large-scale fashion shoot, breaking down every step from the questions he asked the client to the final presentation of his estimate. Join us for tips, tricks and insights that will help you land your next big job.

This informative online webinar is free for all live attendees.

Join us Wednesday, October 15 — REGISTER TODAY!

• • •

PrintGetting Paid:
Compensation for Photographers in the 21st Century
Tuesday, October 21 – 1:00 pm Eastern

Join host Richard Kelly for a conversation with ASMP Executive Director Eugene Mopsik about compensation for photographers. Gene’s experiences advocating on behalf of professional photographers — in negotiations with major publishers, before Congressional Committees, and during hearings at the U.S. Copyright Office — have given him a unique understanding of the forces at play, the pressure points that remain in the marketplace, and what photographers can do to overcome them.

This provocative online webinar is free for all live attendees.

Join us Tuesday, October 21 — REGISTER TODAY!

• • •

IETtraiiler
The Illumination Experience Tour
with renowned cinematographer, Shane Hurlbut
Tour ends November 17

The Illumination Experience Tour delivers an intense educational experience about the fundamentals of cinematography. Taught by Shane Hurlbut, A.S.C. — Director of Photography for 18 Hollywood films — this full-day workshop will teach you powerful principles and techniques you can immediately use in your filmmaking projects.  Learn more at www.illumination-experience.com.

ASMP Members:
click here to save $25 on all registration levels.

• • •

PPE_LOGOPhoto Plus Expo
October 30 – November 1
Javits Convention Center, New York

With over 80 seminars, keynote presentations featuring Martin Parr, Ben Folds and several prominent photojournalists working with A Day Without News, intensive Master Classes, Photo Walks and a huge trade expo, you won’t want to miss Photo Plus Expo this year! Register before July 31st and take advantage of their great early bird pricing. Learn more at photoplusexpo.com or download the PDF brochure.

Don’t miss these fabulous ASMP sponsored seminars:
Growing Your Business when Everyone has a Camera with Judy Herrmann
Road to Seeing: Nurturing Your Creative Sensibility with Dan Winters

ASMP members:
click here to save $150 on a Full Conference Pass.  Add a VIP swag bag for just $75 and get exclusive access to the Halloween Monster Mash party and a chance to win one of 100+ gold ticket prizes!

• • •

PSPF_REVIEWS
The Official Portfolio Reviews at Photo Plus

October 30 – November 1
Javits Convention Center, New York

The Official Portfolio Review at PhotoPlus Expo is America’s premier review event for emerging and professional photographers. Organized by the Palm Springs Photo Festival in conjunction with Photo District News and The Photo Group, this event offers a fabulous opportunity to meet and present your work for critique, feedback and advice. At no other time can a photographer see such a cross-section of potential clients/representatives from both the commercial and fine art arenas in a three-day period.

ASMP members:
click here to save 15% on your registration – the best discount available!

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

This Week In Photography Books: Stephen Shore

A Photo Editor's Blog - Fri, 09/26/2014 - 9:52am

by Jonathan Blaustein

I was sitting in a Mexican restaurant the other day. My Dad was across the table; we were both a little sketched out. The joint seemed like a front for the mob: dirty, empty, and unintentional.

Dad was buying with a coupon, so I guess I already appear ungrateful. Which might end up as the theme of the column, when all is said and done. (Yes, that is foreshadowing.)

We were waiting for our tacos when the door flew open. Dramatically. In stepped a very large, crew-cut, blue-eyed man dressed like rancher, in jeans and a Western shirt. He was sporting a baseball cap that made reference to Texas. (I couldn’t say beyond that, exactly, as he was moving rather quick.)

Behind him marched a procession of five children and a wife, all wearing homemade long dresses and bright-white bonnets. They looked Amish, or like refugees from a compound in Utah that they featured on “Big Love.” It was a little bit Kubrick, to say the least.

Stranger still, once they got settled, the big man began speaking, very loudly, to two Mexican men, the only other patrons in the place. Fluently. In Mexican-accented Spanish.

I did a triple-take.

Odder-yet-still, within five minutes, he began singing. In Spanish. At the top of his lungs. In the middle of lunch.

What?

I had no frame of reference.

Sometimes, life catches you by surprise, like a leopard pouncing on a lady who’s just out to wash the laundry. There’s no way to prepare.

That’s how I felt when I opened up the new Stephen Shore book, “From Galilee to the Negev,” recently published by Phaidon. Wouldn’t you know, it was the next book on my stack, after last week’s genius Israel offering by Rosalind Fox Solomon.

Stephen Shore, doing Israel, for the “This Place” folks? How lucky was I? How lucky are you?

Awkward silence.
Fingers pausing on the keyboard.
How to proceed?

All right, I’ll just be honest. I found this book less-than-enthralling. Slightly under-dramatic. It’s hard to believe he’s covering the same country as Ms. Solomon. No sooner than I’d written about the tension in the air, the vibe pulsing through everything in its path, than I open up this book.

I know, many of you will consider it blasphemous that I’d even hint at criticizing a master of the medium. A member of the metaphorical Mt Rushmore of 20th Century photography. How dare he, you might think.

I get it. That’s why I chose to review the book, if you call this a review. I’ll let you see some photos and make up your own mind.

Mr. Shore, at his best, managed to squeeze deep pathos into the most meaningless of situations. That’s his hallmark, a level of perception that supersedes mere mortals. Not to mention his subtlety with color, and super-sharp large format negatives.

In this book, there is not a lot of life. (No chutzpah, if you will.)

What happened?

I couldn’t tell you. Which makes it interesting. How does a great artist go to a fascinating place and not make fascinating pictures? How did Baz Lurhmann’s “The Great Gatsby” end up so bad I couldn’t make it 10 minutes into the film?

Not to suggest that this book is bad. It’s not. It just depicts a place entirely more placid than in the books I reviewed by Mr. Brenner and Ms. Solomon.

Am I an ingrate? To expect greatness from a great artist? Are average fish tacos worth it, if you don’t have to pay for them? Did that big Texan break his family out from some Branch-Dividian-esque compound near Waco?

I have no idea.

If I were a betting man, I’d say they were his kids, he does ranch work near the Mexican border, and makes his family dress differently than he does. I’d also bet that Mr. Shore enjoyed making these pictures as much as he did in his stuff from the 70’s.

It’s hard not to see this project as something like the Rolling Stones might make at this stage of their career. They keep touring, and people keep buying tickets to hear “Satisfaction” in person. Their fans are thrilled to get the experience, and consider it money well spent.

Am I being unfair to Mr. Shore, when I compare his book directly with two others that were made in the same place? Or by expecting his work to reach the same heights it did years ago? Are these questions worth asking?

Let’s finish by wishing you a Happy New Year. If you celebrate that sort of thing.

Bottom Line: Confusing book about Israel from a master

To Purchase “From Galilee to the Negev” Visit Photo-Eye

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Books are provided by Photo-Eye in exchange for links back for purchase.

Books are found in the bookstore and submissions are not accepted.

Categories: Business

The New Right in Front of You

ASMP's Strictly Business - Fri, 09/26/2014 - 12:01am

[by Luke Copping]

My girlfriend was always bugging me to take pictures of our dogs.

Not just in the backyard running around on my iPhone, but well lit, posed, and formal portraits of our mastiff and our two great danes. I don’t really photograph animals, but when your significant other asks you enough you eventually give in.

I just loved working with them and eventually shared the pictures on my blog. Oddly enough, a few days later I was contacted by a pharmaceutical firm that wanted to license these images of my dogs for use in a small web campaign. It was pretty surprising, and that stock purchase quickly turned into an assignment for the same company that added cats and horses to the mix. As my excitement for working with animals grew, so did the job and stock opportunities that were becoming available. Before you knew it, without planning or ambition to start to fill that niche, a significant portion of my business now comes from animal photography.

I’ve also been able to branch out into something else which I haven’t been able to do for sometime, which is using my photography for good. I now work with a local animal shelter near my studio to provide adoption images for their animals to aid in the process of finding them new homes. Inadvertently, the press and community support for this program has grown in even more working opportunities.

Sometimes, opportunity comes knocking on your door and a lot of the time we don’t even recognize it. Sometimes we spend so much time focusing on the minutia of our plans and strategies that we are blind when something amazing happens right in front of our eyes. Make sure there is room in your life for the unexpected and be ready to follow that where it might lead you, because the new horizons it leads you too can change everything.

Luke Copping is a commercial and editorial photographer from Buffalo, NY – He loves organizations like the City of Buffalo Animal Shelter and notabully.org which help to find wonderful but overlooked dog breeds new homes.

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

Art Producers Speak: Joseph Puhy

A Photo Editor's Blog - Thu, 09/25/2014 - 10:33am

We emailed Art Buyers and Art Producers around the world asking them to submit names of established photographers who were keeping it fresh and up-and-comers who they are keeping their eye on. If you are an Art Buyer/Producer or an Art Director at an agency and want to submit a photographer anonymously for this column email: Suzanne.sease@verizon.net

Anonymous Art Buyer: I nominate Joseph Puhy because he is absolutely darling.

The Duke Boys!! It was a dream come true working with my childhood heroes during this project for Doner and autotrader.com

The Duke Boys!! It was a dream come true working with my childhood heroes during this project for Doner and autotrader.com

While documenting the chaos of running a mud bog on the set of the Animal Planet series, Mud Lovin’ Rednecks, I caught this tender moment between father and son.

While documenting the chaos of running a mud bog on the set of the Animal Planet series, Mud Lovin’ Rednecks, I caught this tender moment between father and son.

A personal project, inspired by one of my favorite dirt bike riding locations, created this late afternoon situation for a great image.

A personal project, inspired by one of my favorite dirt bike riding locations, created this late afternoon situation for a great image.

For Dry Kounty’s look-book shoot, we decided to use actors as models in vignettes to embody the personality of the brand.

For Dry Kounty’s look-book shoot, we decided to use actors as models in vignettes to embody the personality of the brand.

In collaboration with the model, my original concept morphed into this quirky portrait.

In collaboration with the model, my original concept morphed into this quirky portrait.

Using the model from the above (image 5), I highlighted his versatility in relation to our location. I love environmental portraits.

Using the model from the above (image 5), I highlighted his versatility in relation to our location. I love environmental portraits.

Reflective of my personal style, this is one of six ads shot for the Woo Agency and Lenovo.

Reflective of my personal style, this is one of six ads shot for the Woo Agency and Lenovo.

As with the above (image 7), there was an easy rapport with the Art Director for this Lowe CE agency Ghirardelli Chocolate ad.

As with the above (image 7), there was an easy rapport with the Art Director for this Lowe CE agency Ghirardelli Chocolate ad.

Kip Thorne, Theoretical Physicist. Photographed for science magazine, Newton.

Kip Thorne, Theoretical Physicist. Photographed for science magazine, Newton.

Dude. Running. Location. Epic.

Dude. Running. Location. Epic.

How many years have you been in business?
19 years total, including assisting which started in high school, but shooting consistently the last seven years.

Are you self-taught or photography school taught?
I graduated from Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara, back in the days of film and Polaroid. I’ve taught myself everything digital since my days in the darkroom.

Who was your greatest influence that inspired you to get into this business?
First off, my father was a Creative Director, so there was endless reference material at home to get lost in; art, photography books, art publications like Zoom and Lurzer’s Archive. Also, he’d take me out on shoots during the summers. Next, it was the photographers I worked for on summer breaks in high school and first years at college. They introduced me to the craft of photography, lens choice, lighting, processing, film stocks, and how it all tied together. There was a real sense of alchemy that I couldn’t figure out but was drawn to. That’s the reason I decided to go to Brooks and learn the technical aspects of photography.

How do you find your inspiration to be so fresh, push the envelope, stay true to yourself so that creative folks are noticing you and hiring you?
It’s a balance that I’m constantly refining. Luckily, now I have a body of work where I can throw a few curve balls into a commercial book. A balance between execution, observation, and subject matter.

Do you find that some creatives love your work but the client holds you back?
Yes, to a certain extent. Not so much when shooting the job, because at that point it’s a collaboration, more in trying to get the job. I’ve found that having great relationships with creatives, buyers and producers has gotten me to the table to bid on some amazing projects but often lose out to a “bigger name photographer” based on the client’s recommendation. In the end it’s their money, and they need to make the decision that’s best for them. I just keep pushing forward to the next opportunity.

What are you doing to get your vision out to the buying audience?
First, I try to meet face-to-face with agencies where I might be a good fit. That can be a difficult process, but I think that when meeting someone in person, they can get a better sense of what I’m about. I participate on many marketing sites, and was recently invited to be a part of At-Edge.

What is your advice for those who are showing what they think the buyers want to see?
You better like it too. You have to show work that you want to produce.

Are you shooting for yourself and creating new work to keep your artistic talent true to you?
Yes, I do personal projects for promos. If there is time on jobs and the situation allows for it I try to do a version for myself.

How often are you shooting new work?
Every month.

———————

I am a Los Angeles photographer that works with a wide range of clients from commercial to editorial. My style has a natural aesthetic with a cinematic approach. I capture moments of people and things relating to their environment, either in harmony or discord. That relationship tells stories worth sharing.

Website: www.puhy.com
E-mail: Joseph@puhy.com

APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world. She has been involved in the photography and illustration industry since the mid 80s, after founding the art buying department at The Martin Agency then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies. She has a new Twitter fed with helpful marketing information.  Follow her@SuzanneSease.

Categories: Business

Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue …

ASMP's Strictly Business - Thu, 09/25/2014 - 12:01am

[by Pascal Depuhl]

LinkedIn

Pascal’s been on LinkedIn since 2004!

OK. So it’s not borrowed (and no, I don’t shoot weddings), but I want to write about something new, that I’ve been using for almost a decade now: LinkedIn. Lately I’ve been surprised at the effectiveness of this network, that Rosh Sillars calls “the Facebook for professionals”.

LinkedIn is the social network of business. People expect you to focus on work. Gary Vaynerchuck predicts in “Jab, jab, jab, right hook,” that LinkedIn “will be our Library, where we get our deals done.”

Nothing comes from nothing

Of course LinkedIn will not magically have photography and video assignments flooding your inbox, just because you’ve signed up; although almost all the photographers I’ve asked who use LinkedIn, expected to get hired straight from their profile.

You must be SIGNIFICANTLY more remarkable than your competitors.Well unfortunately that’s not how LinkedIn (or any social media for that matter) works. You must offer something valuable for people to want to interact with you. Many of us remember self promotion used to be us sending out mailers, buying ads and making cold calls (aka outbound marketing). Today it’s much more about clients finding you, seeing you as the expert and building trust (that’s called inbound marketing).

Enter LinkedIn Groups. People join groups, because they want to connect with others, learn more about the groups focus or comment on content that is interesting. It’s a golden opportunity to share content you already create (or should be creating) with a very focused group of people. Check out the graph below that tracks my LinkedIn profile views–can you guess when I started interacting with my LinkedIn groups?

Analytics

Sometimes you can teach an old dog new tricks.  Go and update your LinkedIn profile today and while you’re at it, post some amazing and relevant content to LinkedIn groups.

Pascal Depuhl uses social media, SEO and blogging to help clients find him online for  almost 10 years now. LinkedIn plays a big role in his social media strategy and gives Photography by Depuhl credibility when B2B customers learn about his business through reviews, shared content and connections.

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

Bruce Gilden Critiques Art Photography

A Photo Editor's Blog - Wed, 09/24/2014 - 8:04pm

This is pretty funny in ways that it was meant to be and not.

Categories: Business

Don’t Wait…Too Late

ASMP's Strictly Business - Wed, 09/24/2014 - 12:01am

[by Kevin Lock]

I read recently that the iPhone 6 is setting records, and it only just came out. Lines formed at Apple Stores around the country long before the big release on September 19. Sadly, I wasn’t there.

I have never been one who had to have the latest. In fact, I am usually late in having what everyone else couldn’t wait to get. I didn’t wait in line for the original iPhone or any of its successors. To be honest, I didn’t have a smart phone until the iPhone 4 was released and at that point I bought the iPhone 3. Why did I wait that many years? What a mistake.

Perhaps this precedent was set while I was in college. Back then, even though I invested all of the ‘extra’ money I earned in better camera gear, I was always a step behind, buying yesterday’s gems from the top photojournalists in my community. When there was a new release by Nikon, say the Nikon F4, I got the F3. With the release of the F5, I upgraded to an F4. And then digital hit. As you might have guessed, the D1 was out for a couple of years before I picked one up.

Most of the time I told myself that I just could not afford the latest. Looking back, one could argue that I was not disciplined enough to make the wiser investment in the new technology and subsequently my future.

Somehow, this year, that has begun to change for me. First, a fellow photographer convinced me to invest in new lighting gear. Then, an editor suggested I replace my “antiquated” camera. I found myself listening to others, trying out and buying new equipment and taking it to another level. Ultimately I realized that I could not afford to not be disciplined enough to make the investment.

For the first time in my life I own the newest and best camera Nikon has to offer. The D4s. It was a huge investment for me, the purchase price being more than 95% of the cars I have ever owned. I also picked up a few Profoto B1’s. I had them before they hit the shelves and as fast as Profoto could ship them to me. With both of these investments the a-ha moments began to roll in. And of course, I felt the guilt. Just as I did when I fist started reading my email on the iPhone 3 (like everyone else had been doing for years). How could I wait this long?

I now realize this habit of waiting is not the best way to go about acquiring the technology required to stay relevant in my profession today. Perhaps I might need to line up at the Apple Store after all.

Kevin Lock is a current director for the ASMP. While he claims not to be a spokesman for Nikon, Apple or Profoto, it is indeed factual that he has been a nikon man since just a boy, has never owned a PC and has now seen “the light” when it comes to owning the best gear available.

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

The Daily Edit – Gail Bichler : New York Times Magazine Art Director

A Photo Editor's Blog - Tue, 09/23/2014 - 9:42am

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The New York Times Magazine

Editor: Jake Silverstein
Design Director: Gail Bichler
Director of Photography: Kathy Ryan
Photo Editor: Christine Walsh
Photographer: Johnny Miller
Stylist: Randi Brookman Harris

Heidi:Once your direction was set to show a package of pills received by mail, what were the next steps in the creative process and what was your time frame?
Gail: The next steps were deciding how we wanted to the package to look, thinking about what type of image would best convey our message and then figuring out the best person to shoot that kind of image. We were on a pretty tight time frame, as we usually are since the magazine is weekly. We had about five days to pull the shoot together.

 

 

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Was it this body of work (My Parents Love Letters ) by Johnny Miller that convinced the team he was right for the project? Were there any other considerations and made you choose him? See the full gallery  here
Yes, this was the body of work that made us think of him. We wanted the image to feel very natural and dimensional – to walk the line of being a conceptual image but with the feel of something real. Our photo department had been looking for an opportunity to work with Johnny, and Christine Walsh (the photo editor on the project) and I thought he would be great for this because his work is clean and graphic but still personal.

I loved the small tear in the cover where the bottle is, what other details were taken into consideration to make this image come alive?
A simple image like this is all about the details, so we paid a lot of attention to them. We hired stylist Randi Brookman Harris, with whom we’ve collaborated quite a bit. She sourced a number of different kinds of envelopes and adjusted them to fit the proportions of the cover. We also designed cancellation and metered postage stamps from India (the point of origin for the packages mentioned in the story) and Randi commissioned rubber stamps of them to be applied to the envelopes. We estimated how much a package like this would weigh and accounted for that when fabricating the metered stamp. Randi applied both stamps to the modified envelopes somewhat haphazardly to approximate the way they would appear if they had actually gone through the postal service, and she applied unequal pressure so the ink would vary in density. We placed a square box in the package to give the impression of the volume of the pillbox and began shooting. As the shoot progressed, we also tried versions where we beat up the envelope more, adding wrinkles and smearing the stamps to give the impression that the envelope had been through the mail.

I know from working at news organization there’s prestige and a social responsibility that comes with designing news journalism. How has your role as the Art Director shaped you personally?
There is definitely a social responsibility aspect to working for The New York Times. While there is always a craft and attention to aesthetics that is part of what I do as an art director, there are also many other considerations when designing news. Under the best circumstances my most eye-catching design is tonally on target, the most arresting photographs correspond with the narrative of the piece, and the most graphic concept for a cover accurately captures the main point of the story, but in cases where that doesn’t happen, conveying the intent and message of the writing wins out over the aesthetic considerations. I have learned to look past my own viewpoints on the subjects we cover and see the story from varying angles. And in some cases, it’s necessary for me to temper my own goals for the visuals of a piece with what is right for the magazine and the brand of The New York Times. My view of visual story telling and journalism has become much more nuanced.

While I was at The Los Angeles Times Magazine I remembered having moments of being semi paralyzed and in awe of the amount of news being produced on a daily basis. How does the volume of news and your acute awareness effect you as a mother?
The amount of news being generated a daily basis is absolutely dizzying. Particularly in this moment when digital access means that our choices of where to get information have multiplied exponentially. As a mother, I sometimes worry about the easy accessibility of news that is increasingly more violent and graphic. I want to protect my 5-year-old son’s innocence while I can, so I make efforts not to watch or listen to the news around him, because the coverage can quickly shift from a benign topic to something that could be scary for a little person. 

However, I’ve also seen the upsides to the kind of instant access to news and information that we now have. It’s great to be able to satisfy a curious mind not only with a verbal explanation, but also with images. Particularly for a very visual learner like my son. That has never been as easy to do as it is now. As with everything, we take the good with the bad.

Buying a new website?
APhotoFolio.com builds portfolio websites for photographers.
Have a look (here).

Categories: Business

Rejuvenation In Stealth Mode

ASMP's Strictly Business - Tue, 09/23/2014 - 12:01am

[by Colleen Wainwright]

After a few years of doing the same-old, same-old, I had reached an impasse. My work, giving talks on and consulting with small creative businesses about marketing, had grown stale. Worse, my ability to write had all but dried up, and I’d lost my mojo for the few collaborative projects I’d begun. (When it rains, it pours down from the heavens like Kansas skies on Dorothy Gale.)

Part of me wanted to trash my entire website and start over: I loved the accountability of a public presence, but felt self-conscious about changing things up on the old blog so abruptly. Another part of me thought that going public was the problem: that I needed to write privately. I was mulling things when it hit me: what if I could reboot my creative life in a way that would hold me accountable, but not too publicly?

Thus was born a fresh, new, semi-personal project: a semi-secret 100-day experiment in writing and creating, shared with only a minute sliver of my audience. Not on Facebook. Definitely not on my blog. Instead, I chose a new venue I’ve been itching to audition for a while now, but couldn’t find a reason to.

What’s fascinating is what’s already shifted in the few weeks that I committed to doing this side project. I’ve landed a couple of “expertise-adjacent” side gigs that will expose me to new ways of doing business and teach me new skills. I’ve had a few remarkable people show up in my life who are both challenging me to grow and showing me how much I already knew, but didn’t realize.

Best of all, I’m writing again. Not for the ages, maybe, but for me, and with satisfying (so far) engagement. I’m excited about what comes next, even though I have no idea what it will be.

Because, of course, it’s a secret.

Colleen Wainwright is happily writing in semi-secrecy, for now, although she will continue to share ridiculous, topical items on the site we all love to hate.

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

Brands will define pro photography for the next decade

A Photo Editor's Blog - Mon, 09/22/2014 - 11:57am

From Paul Melcher’s blog “Thoughts of a Bohemian”

since editorial photography’s dominance in our cultural landscape diminished, the advertising world had to look elsewhere for inspiration. No longer can they count on their magazines to give them a hint on what type of photography is successful. Instead, they turned to the new trend indicator : Social media.

It will not be surprising, it is happening already, to see editorial photography influenced by brand photography. In an effort to keep pace with current trends, online and print publications are more and more looking into what works for brands and applying it to their spreads.

For now, we still live in a world slightly dominated by editorial photography, only because of cultural habits. But deeper, the evolution has already happened and is progressing with patient obstination.

Read The Article Here: Brands will define pro photography for the next decade. – Thoughts of a Bohemian.

Categories: Business

Expanding Horizons

ASMP's Strictly Business - Mon, 09/22/2014 - 12:02am

[by Jenna Close]

This is the year that I started offering video services as part of my photography business. It began with curiosity; a lot of my clients were asking for video and I wanted to see if it was something I would enjoy. I started by shooting a couple of 2-3 minute, corporate style pieces for some friends who own companies.

At first, I didn’t shoot enough footage, which I didn’t realize until I tried my hand at editing. Editing was the single most important educational process for me. Camera operation and lighting were similar to still photography, and even color grading (I use Davinci Resolve Lite, which is a free program with a massive amount of features) was pretty familiar after spending so many years in Photoshop. But editing…that was tricky.

Sure, I could have hired an editor, but I think it’s important for everyone interested in video to edit a few pieces themselves. It made blatantly obvious every single thing I had forgotten to consider: shooting enough b-roll, getting wide, medium and detail shots of each scene, making sure I had enough variety to make the piece interesting, etc. After a few failures and a few successes, I found that I really enjoyed shooting video. So I put two of the videos up on my website and figured “heck, if I get a few video jobs here and there, that would be a great additional source of revenue.”

What happened? So far this year the motion projects have far surpassed still photography. A decent number of clients have also hired me to shoot both. I really didn’t expect it to take off like that.

While video isn’t really a new thing anymore, it was new to my business and new to me. Now that I have a handle on it, I want to spend this next year building a network of people I can bring in for larger projects and higher production value. As someone who generally works with my business partner and a few assistants, assembling and managing a large crew is a new prospect. In addition, assigning major responsibility to someone like a camera operator is something I need to get comfortable with. But, stepping outside of my comfort zone and collaborating with other people are important parts of growing my business.

When Jenna was a kid she rearranged her room every month without fail. After college she lived in 6 different states in the span of 9 years. She finally settled in San Diego, where she still likes to try new things. 

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

What’s New?

ASMP's Strictly Business - Mon, 09/22/2014 - 12:01am

We all know that the same-old, same-old doesn’t work so well in these rapidly changing times.  We’ve all got to stretch ourselves – take some risks and try new things. This week, our contributors share some new things they’re trying in their businesses and how that’s working out for them.  I hope they’ll inspire you to explore new services, adopt some new habits or add a new twist to what you’re already doing.  ~Judy Herrmann, Editor

 

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

This Week In Photography Books: Rosalind Fox Solomon

A Photo Editor's Blog - Fri, 09/19/2014 - 9:55am

by Jonathan Blaustein

I know a photographer who won’t tell people he/she is Jewish. It’s a secret. He/she worries for his/her safety, if the information ever got out.

I still remember the fantasy of Barack Obama’s inaugural days as President, when people spoke of a post-racial society. It would be funny, if it weren’t so sad. How ridiculous that idea seems, in retrospect.

There is, and has always been, the other. People who don’t look like you, talk like you, or copulate like you. People who worship a deity with a different name.

Them.

They’re not like us.

Me, I admit I’m Jewish in this column all the time. Why? It feels a touch defiant, as my people are disliked by many. Growing up, in the 70’s and 80’s, I still felt like I ought to keep my identity on the downlow. And this was in the orbit of New York City, no less.

I suppose I revel in the rebellion of claiming membership in a controversial tribe. “The Tribe,” as we often call ourselves. If it ever comes back to bite me, this freedom of identification, I suppose you can say “I told you so.”

As I mentioned some time back, I visited Israel when I was young, but have yet to return. I’m hoping the opportunity presents itself, but I guess we’ll have to see. It’s a country that is claimed by many, and owned by few. A more tortured history, you’re unlikely to find. (Insert random suffering reference here.)

The Jews were expelled for daring to stand up to the Romans. A diaspora of millions, created with the stroke of a pen. (Or a quill? What would those Romans have written with, I wonder?)

Regardless, the Palestinians were kind-of-ejected as well, and they’d like to get it back. The Christians, too, feel a deep connection, as it was the birthplace of the Jewish man Jesus, a messiah to some.

Regardless of which side you root for, it’s not a stretch to say the tension is carried through the air, there, like heat waves rising off of pale cobblestones. The wounds might never heal. Or perhaps they will? Who am I to speculate?

But that tension, that crippling feeling in your stomach, pulsates through “Them,” a new book by Rosalind Fox Solomon, recently published by MACK.

This book is one of the series commissioned by the project “This Place,” which invited major artists to Israel to poke around. A month or so ago, I reviewed an excellent book by Frederic Brenner, from the same series, and I might do more still, if the quality is this good going forward.

Open it up, and the first page shows a tourist holding a map of Israel, talking to two African women. It sets the scene, in a subtle way. Then, three words on otherwise blank pages: the holy longing. Afterwards, a photograph of a sere, desolate desert. It’s safe to guess we’re in the Holy Land. (At least, I did.)

I wasn’t aware, when I first perused, that this book was a part of “This Place.” I was curious what motivated the production. I hate to repeat words, but it’s just so cripplingly tense. It made me physically uncomfortable, turning the pages.

So much passion. Anger. Dismay. Banality. Drama.

There are text breaks on blank pages throughout, and they might crack through your veneer of world-weariness:

“you don’t understand”
“i want my kids to live in peace”
“god is here for everyone”
“security will be suspicious”
“i love you i love you i love you”
“take care of your mother/ i’ll call you tomorrow.”

Needless to say, those lines could have been uttered by anyone wrapped up in the conflict. They’re universal, which is part of the book’s message, I suppose. When so many have been done wrong, over so long, who can claim a superiority of suffering?

I almost skipped to the end of this book, several times, just to break the spell. I wanted it to be over, the unpleasant perceptiveness. I wanted to feel safe again, in my own house, with asshole neighbors, yes, but not ones who wanted to kill me.

I resisted. The urge, that is. It’s my job to look at these books and report to you, so I stayed strong and went one page at a time. Like a good boy.

It’s rare that I pick up a book and have it affect me this palpably. It’s experiential, this one, so much so that I haven’t really mentioned the successful use of black and white, or the square frame. So many of these pictures appear as if they could have been made 10, 20, 30, or 40 years ago. They feel timeless and fresh at the same time.

Despite the fact that the end credits name-drop some heavy hitters in the art world, and that the invited artists were all meant to be “prominent,” I’d never heard of Ms. Solomon before.

Too bad for me.

She is clearly an insightful, creative, and powerful artist, near the top of her craft. For as many books as I see, for one to crack me over the skull like this is worth mentioning again. You might consider buying this one.

It’s special.

Bottom Line: Masterful depiction of every-day life in a perpetual conflict zone

To Purchase “Them” Visit Photo-Eye

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Books are provided by Photo-Eye in exchange for links back for purchase.

Books are found in the bookstore and submissions are not accepted.

Categories: Business

Digital Asset Management as a Client Service

ASMP's Strictly Business - Fri, 09/19/2014 - 12:01am

[by David Diamond]

Now that Digital Asset Management has (almost) become a topic companies understand, an opportunity has arisen for professional photographers. Today’s “please send me” request can be tomorrow’s new revenue stream.

Digital Asset Management Services

In addition to photo services, there’s no reason you can’t offer to store and manage digital assets for your clients. Whether you limit collections to photos you’ve taken, or you enable clients to add files of their own, a DAM is something that must be managed in order to provide any value. Some clients might already have DAMs under control; but others might like the idea of you—the photographer they know and trust—managing a DAM for them.

To get you started, here are a few things to consider:

  1. You’ll need a DAM system that can serve multiple clients. Typically called “multi-tenant,” these systems provide a virtual wall between each client’s collections, helping to ensure secure separation. DAMs built for multi-tenant use can also make things easier for you to manage. If you’re not up for installing and managing the system yourself, look for a Cloud-based solution. Just remember— true multi-tenancy is key. Google “multi-tenant cloud DAM system” to find some options.
  2. Make sure your DAM provides usage statistics that honor the separation between your clients. This way, you can run reports at the end of the month or quarter, and quickly see who’s been using the system. You can charge by connection time, number of downloads—you name it. A system that’s not truly multi-tenant won’t be able to separate the usage of Client A from that of Client B.
  3. Don’t underestimate the value of your time! Freelancers can sometimes shy away from asking clients for money. The closer we become to our clients, the softer the boundary becomes between service and favor. But your time is valuable, and your expertise managing image collections is invaluable. Most clients wouldn’t have any idea how to set up a DAM system, so you’re doing them a favor.

Marketing Befitting a Creative Professional

If you’re at a loss for how to “sell” your new service to clients, think like a marketer. What’s in it for them?

  • Now you can access your entire collection on-demand, 24/7. No more waiting for me to return from vacation!
  • Share images across the company or social media, right from the DAM. No need to manage duplicate files on your own.
  • No need for you to learn about metadata or anything else—I’ll take care of it all. You’ll have a single portal from which you can see and approve new work, or quickly find archived work.

There’s good in this for you too:

  • You strengthen your client relationships because you now have an ongoing business relationship rather than an occasional project.
  • Usage patterns show you which images are most popular with your clients, so you’ll have a better idea of what they like.
  • You’ll be making money, even while your favorite camera back is in the shop. A service like this would be a bargain at $100/month. That’s a fraction of what client would pay for a professionally managed DAM of their own. Multiply that times 50 clients and you might not even bother to pick up that camera back.

Here’s more that I’ve written on the topic, including a case study example: http://picturepark.com/dam-solutions/resell-digital-asset-management-services/

David Diamond has been working in Digital Asset Management for more than 16 years. He founded DAM Guru Program and authored DAM Survival Guide. Diamond manages global marketing for Swiss DAM vendor, Picturepark. He was awarded the 2013 DAMMY of the Year for his educational contributions to the industry.

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

Art Producers Speak: Patrick Fraser

A Photo Editor's Blog - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 10:30am

We emailed Art Buyers and Art Producers around the world asking them to submit names of established photographers who were keeping it fresh and up-and-comers who they are keeping their eye on. If you are an Art Buyer/Producer or an Art Director at an agency and want to submit a photographer anonymously for this column email: Suzanne.sease@verizon.net

Anonymous Art Buyer: I nominate Patrick Fraser. I worked with him on extremely complicated projects and he always over delivered. Understanding vision of agency creative, suggesting solution for unusual concepts, delivering beautiful photography and always under budget. What else can an art buyer want from the photographer.

Carla Korbes is a principal dancer with the Pacific Northwest Ballet.  I wanted to photograph her in a raw setting with very simple styling so I picked Long Beach WA in the early morning wearing this very simple black leotard.

Carla Korbes is a principal dancer with the Pacific Northwest Ballet.  I wanted to photograph her in a raw setting with very simple styling so I picked Long Beach WA in the early morning wearing this very simple black leotard.

Here is an example of my magazine portrait work.  Don Cheadle and Chloe Sevigny photographed for two different magazine features. The magazine ended up using color images for the features but I like to offer up some black and white.  For Don I used a 4x5 with BW film.  Chloe pictured in the window of a studio in New York was also taken with a roll of grainy BW medium format film.

Here is an example of my magazine portrait work.  Don Cheadle and Chloe Sevigny photographed for two different magazine features. The magazine ended up using color images for the features but I like to offer up some black and white.  For Don I used a 4×5 with BW film.  Chloe pictured in the window of a studio in New York was also taken with a roll of grainy BW medium format film.

My friends daughter Jane was taken with a disposable underwater camera.  Everything is working for me, her hair, the colors, the grainy real quality and her gaze.

My friends daughter Jane was taken with a disposable underwater camera.  Everything is working for me, her hair, the colors, the grainy real quality and her gaze.

I was walking the streets of Paris when I spotted these boys playing Rugby.  I walked up to them with my Leica M6 and started to shoot and they did'nt mind at all they just kept on playing.  I love the faces here and all that muddy skin. 

I was walking the streets of Paris when I spotted these boys playing Rugby.  I walked up to them with my Leica M6 and started to shoot and they did’nt mind at all they just kept on playing.  I love the faces here and all that muddy skin. 

I shot this lookbook all at night in Silver Lake CA.  The story was called Into the Night.

I shot this lookbook all at night in Silver Lake CA.  The story was called Into the Night.

One of those real moments caught between a friend Ceara and her dog.

One of those real moments caught between a friend Ceara and her dog.

This was taken for an editorial men's fashion story about night surfers in San Diego.  The art director wanted it as real as possible. I started the shoot by getting on my wetsuit and shooting the guys in the water with a flash. Shooting surfing at night is a challenge but the images came out great!

This was taken for an editorial men’s fashion story about night surfers in San Diego.  The art director wanted it as real as possible. I started the shoot by getting on my wetsuit and shooting the guys in the water with a flash. Shooting surfing at night is a challenge but the images came out great!

I love the spontaneous energy in this shot of two actors from TV show Nashville.  It shows my studio work and was photographed for Nylon Magazine's TV special issue.

I love the spontaneous energy in this shot of two actors from TV show Nashville.  It shows my studio work and was photographed for Nylon Magazine’s TV special issue.

This is a still from a music video I directed with musician Marissa Nadler.  I chose Lake Erie in Ohio for the location as a cold frozen lake spoke to me in her song Rosary.  I love this location and luckily it was the middle of winter so the lake was frozen which ads to the drama.

This is a still from a music video I directed with musician Marissa Nadler.  I chose Lake Erie in Ohio for the location as a cold frozen lake spoke to me in her song Rosary.  I love this location and luckily it was the middle of winter so the lake was frozen which ads to the drama.

This is one of the shots I took at Vail International Dance Festival in August 2014. It pictures Tiler Peck and Robbie Fairchild of New York City Ballet doing a pose from the Jerome Robbins ballet  "Afternoon of a Faun".  I love to shoot dancers as they know how to move.

This is one of the shots I took at Vail International Dance Festival in August 2014. It pictures Tiler Peck and Robbie Fairchild of New York City Ballet doing a pose from the Jerome Robbins ballet  “Afternoon of a Faun”.  I love to shoot dancers as they know how to move.

One of my all time favorite editorial shoots here with David Lynch.  I arrived at his home and his assistant told me he was in his art studio.  I carefully asked her if there was any way I could go up there and take pictures of him working.   She asked him and he agreed.  It really felt personal, like taking a look into an artists private space.  The result is I have a wonderful series of him working on his fine art.  

One of my all time favorite editorial shoots here with David Lynch.  I arrived at his home and his assistant told me he was in his art studio.  I carefully asked her if there was any way I could go up there and take pictures of him working.  
She asked him and he agreed.  It really felt personal, like taking a look into an artists private space.  The result is I have a wonderful series of him working on his fine art.  

How many years have you been in business?
My first magazine assignment was 16 years ago.

Are you self-taught or photography school taught?
I didn’t go to photography school I actually studied fine art majoring in painting at University in England. Before that I took a foundation course in art & design in my hometown, which had a few photo classes. My father was a documentary filmmaker and gave me my first SLR at age 8. He taught me a lot about photography and showed me how to do black & white printing in the darkroom we had at our home.

Who was your greatest influence that inspired you to get into this business?
I used to collect photography monographs from a really young age and pore over new issues of The Face and Arena magazines as a teen. If it came down to one photographer I’d have to say Avedon. What inspired me about his work was his range of subject matter. He mixed fashion and celebrity in the studio with everyday American workers outdoors in the American West series.

How do you find your inspiration to be so fresh, push the envelope, stay true to yourself so that creative folks are noticing you and hiring you?
I’m always shooting editorial which keeps me on my toes and keeps a constant feed of new work rolling in. Editorial gives me the creative freedom to experiment whilst collaborating with a photo editor or art director. I like how it sharpens my problem solving skills, which can be invaluable on advertising shoots. Editorial is a good way to experiment with new lighting set ups and keep visually exploring. It’s also a good way to keep your name out there.

Do you find that some creatives love your work but the client holds you back?
I’ve been lucky, as I can’t say I have had that experience. Once I have been selected for a project I like to keep up a level of communication, which makes it hard for this to happen. If the communication is clear from the word go and the collaborators are all working well together then the client is usually more than happy with the results.

What are you doing to get your vision out to the buying audience?
You never can market yourself enough and I should be more aggressive in this department. My marketing plan is multi layered and consists of personal printed pieces, e-mails, alongside my editorial credits. My agent also sends out marketing and they do showings of my portfolio.

I was skeptical at first of social networking for marketing and promo, I felt like it weakened the work. Now I have started to post more images that I love and behind the scenes shots on Instagram and have begun to use it more, like an online portfolio. I feel like Instagram is the best social network tool for photographers and a good way to get one’s work in front of creative minded people. You can see my posts @patchypics

What is your advice for those who are showing what they think the buyers want to see?
Photography trends come in waves. You’ll see a photographer being used all over for a couple of years, their style of shooting might start to get copied and then the market for that imagery gets saturated. One must always stay true to one’s own vision and continue to grow and evolve. Shoot what comes naturally to you. Following trends is the kiss of death.

Are you shooting for yourself and creating new work to keep your artistic talent true to you?
Yes always. I’m always out there shooting a test, making a film or thrashing out an idea I had driving or even in my sleep! Just this past week I was up in Vail at a dance festival for a few days and then I started asking the dancers if they had some spare time for a session. I came back with some really strong new images and that started an idea for a new series for me.

How often are you shooting new work?
I have a constant flow of new work. I get excited when there is a gap in commercial or magazine assignments where I can just go off and make images for myself both stills and motion. That is the time to explore what you love and usually that’s when you come back with strong images which were self motivated.

—————

10 FACTS ABOUT PATRICK
1) When he was 18 he rode an Enfield 350 Bullet Motorbike around Northern India.
2) He is renovating a 1948 Homesteader cabin in Joshua Tree, CA.

3) Is reading The 100-Year-Old Man who Climbed out the Window and Disappeared

4) Made his first piece of furniture in 2012, a bench for his garden

5) Is restoring a 1973 Alfa Romeo GTV

6) Loves to sketch

7) He is big on roasting and using the BBQ for slow cooking

8) Rents a production office near Abbott Kinney in Venice, CA

9) 2014 completed a documentary about the art of Taxidermy called Skin Movers

10) He Plays the French horn

APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world. She has been involved in the photography and illustration industry since the mid 80s, after founding the art buying department at The Martin Agency then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies. She has a new Twitter fed with helpful marketing information.  Follow her@SuzanneSease.

Categories: Business

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