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Business

The Chemistry of the Interview

ASMP's Strictly Business - 7 hours 51 min ago

[by Gail Mooney]

When I first started learning video storytelling, I took a class at the Maine Workshops. Our instructor, a crazy guy from LA who worked for the E-channel, broke us up into teams to go out and get man-on-the-street interviews for our class video project, The Cameras of Camden. The video was about surveillance cameras used to monitor people in public spaces. My task was to query random people on the street and ask them what they thought about “being watched”.

The “documentary gods” were definitely riding shotgun with me that day. I came back to the classroom with sound bite gems, which ended up driving 80 % of the video’s narrative. In the process, I found out that I was good at asking questions and more importantly, I was really good at eliciting great responses.

There’s more to getting a good interview than just asking questions. It has to do with your rapport with your subjects. Interviewers are not interchangeable. Give two interviewers the same set of questions to ask the same subject, you will most likely get very different answers. To be a good interviewer is to be a good listener. People sense when someone is interested in what they are saying – or not. If you are genuine and really care about someone’s story, it comes through in the way you engage them and ask the questions. That’s what makes every interview unique – it’s the chemistry of the moment.

Here are some helpful tips for doing interviews:

  • Choose a suitable location. Pick an environment that is quiet and that you have control over. You should also strive to pick a setting that will provide more information about your subject.
  • Ask leading questions – not ones with yes and no answers. Don’t ask the subject “Do you like school?” Ask them “What do you like about school?”
  • I don’t usually insert myself into my interviews so I ask my subjects to paraphrase my questions in their answers. For example: If I ask my subject: “How many children do you have?” they shouldn’t answer by saying “3”. They should answer by saying “I have 3 children”.
  • Don’t step on your subjects’ lines. After your subject stops speaking, pause before you ask your next question. Instruct your subject to do the same, pause before they start answering your question. This will allow your subject to collect his or her thoughts. It will also give your editor a clean place to cut the dialog without overlapping voices. Another benefit is that many times those pauses will provoke your subject to relay more interesting information.
  • Be quiet and use non-audible gestures to affirm your subject’s responses. Don’t utter things like, ok, hmmm, oh etc.
  • Be a good listener. Sometimes the best questions come out of listening to your subject. Many times it’s something a subject says that will lead me to ask a question that I may not have thought of.

Gail Mooney is a photographer and filmmaker. She is a partner at Kelly/Mooney Productions, creating still and motion imagery that tells the story.

 

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

The Art of the Personal Project: Agnes Lopez

A Photo Editor's Blog - Thu, 03/26/2015 - 9:59am

As a former Art Producer, I have always been drawn to personal projects because they are the sole vision of the photographer and not an extension of an art director, photo editor, or graphic designer. This new column, “The Art of the Personal Project” will feature the personal projects of photographers using the Yodelist marketing database. You can read their blog at http://yodelist.wordpress.com. Projects are discovered online and submissions are not accepted.

Today’s featured photographer is: Agnes Lopez

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Full disclosure Agnes is a client of mine.

How long have you been shooting?
Professionally since 2003. Many years before that, my brother-in-law bought a Minolta Maxxum 9000 for me from a pawn shop as a gift because he knew I was interested in photography.

Are you self-taught or photography school taught?
Self-taught. I got my start as a stylist for commercial photographers, so I picked up a lot on set. I would watch the photographers closely to see how they worked and then go off and practice on my own with local models, taking my film to Walgreens to get developed and scanned. I also took some classes at the local community college, where I learned how to use a darkroom and print my work. Cutting my teeth shooting film still influences the way I shoot today. I tend to be very calculating and specific when I finally hit the shutter.

With this particular project, what was your inspiration to shoot it?
In the past three years I’ve made a move into photographing food and food lifestyle images, though mostly for editorial, so I wanted to prove to myself that I could produce a full concept from start to finish.

How many years have you been shooting this project before you decided to present it?
I shot the project early last year and presented it about a month after the last day of shooting.

How long do you spend on a personal project before deciding if it is working?
When I plan a project, I spend a day or two scouting and a few days laying out my vision. I’ll break down the day into a detailed schedule so I can get the absolute most out of my time.

On the day of, I just try to feel it out. I shoot a few frames and don’t try to force it. Since it’s personal work, I give myself the freedom to move onto the next shot if a particular setup isn’t working.

Since shooting for your portfolio is different from personal work, how do you feel when the work is different?
Shooting personal work is more about the process for me. What I ultimately get from the shoot doesn’t have to be a set of portfolio images; I want to learn and grow from something outside of what I do every day.

In my day job shooting for a monthly magazine, I’m usually given a short amount of time and specific parameters for the images I’m producing. With personal work, I’m able to take as long as I need and can experiment with different lighting setups and compositions. The hope is always to bring what I do with my personal projects into the other work I do.

Have you ever posted your personal work on social media venues such as Reddit, Tumblr, Instagram or Facebook?
Occasionally. I will be posting more of it this year after I finish the project I’m working on now.

If so, has the work ever gone viral and possibly with great press?
Not yet, but I plan to do more of it and keep putting it out there for people to see.

Have you printed your personal projects for your marketing to reach potential clients?
Some of the images from this shoot are in my current portfolio, which is primarily my food work.

Artist’s Statement

I had this idea to focus on cocktails and how bartenders make them. I pitched my idea to a package store in my area, the Grape and Grain Exchange, which sells small batch liquors and has a bar up front where they offer really unique drinks.

The bartenders are serious about what they do but they’re also funny guys. My goal was to show the bartenders in their element and how their personalities go into the drinks they make.

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Agnes is an editorial and food lifestyle photographer with a home base in the historic Riverside-Avondale neighborhood of Jacksonville, Florida and is available for assignments worldwide.

From documenting the effort that goes into preparing a pop-up dining event or photographing the fine cuisine of a AAA Five Diamond Award-winning restaurant, Agnes traverses the Southeastern US and beyond with her camera in search of inspiration and exceptional meals.

Her work can be seen regularly in the pages of Jacksonville Magazine and its other publications, Taste, Home, and 904 Magazine.


APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world. She has been involved in the photography and illustration industry since the mid 80s, after establishing the art buying department at The Martin Agency then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies. She has a new Twitter feed with helpful marketing information believing that marketing should be driven by a brand and not specialty. Follow her on twitter at SuzanneSease.

Categories: Business

Brought to you by The Letter T

ASMP's Strictly Business - Thu, 03/26/2015 - 12:01am

[by John Welsh]

If you were asked to use three words to describe a formula for conducting a successful interview, which ones would you pick? For me, it’s Truth, Trust and Time. They are all in play before, during and after an interview.

Everyone wants to be respected in a relationship. And that’s what we are doing every time we interview someone. We are building a relationship and the goal is to share what needs to be revealed.

Truth
It’s more than learning just the facts and it’s totally subjective. Truth is gained from having genuine curiosity about the subject or story you have chosen. It’s hidden in the details of what people really want to tell you. Learn to recognize it. Ask the hard question, but do it with respect. It’s what your audience really wants to know. A person’s truth, and they’re all unique, is what’s behind their actions and behavior.

Trust
It’s something that, of course, needs to be earned. If you’re lucky, you may have days or even weeks to get know your subject. But sometimes it’s less than an hour. So find something in common. Offer details of your own life when relevant. Even resort to small talk, do whatever is needed and break any ice that’s preventing you from connecting with subject.

Time
If you have the luxury, meet your subject for the first time without your camera. We are immune to the idea of cameras being a threat, but for some it’s an intrusion. And any kind of threat, and it could be as simple as being present and photographing a delicate moment (before trust is gained), is a guaranteed way to lose your interview. Spend time to engage your subject. Be honest, be open and you’ll find the time that’s needed is reduced.

In the end, this is not about the interview process or a method to make your subject comfortable on camera. It’s about remembering that your subject is just like you and deserves a certain kind of honesty that’s reserved for intimate occasions, which is really what interviews are.

John Welsh  just completed his run as president of the Philadelphia Chapter of ASMP , is a freelance photographer and part of a Philadelphia based collective of media artists that produce documentary work that’s cinematic in style.  

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

Know What You Want, Stay Engaged, Tilt Your Head and Shut Up.

ASMP's Strictly Business - Wed, 03/25/2015 - 12:01am

[by Todd Joyce]

Three tips to make your interviews stronger:

Know what you want your subject to say and ask the questions to get them to say it.
Sounds simple, but if you’re asking general questions and letting them talk, then your editing time is going to be a nightmare.  Allow for discovery, but know which key topics your subject needs to cover and make sure they say it.  As they answer, imagine editing each comment.  if you don’t have a clean in and out, then ask the question again.  Get a good comment that you can use, rather than something you have to make work.  Save “making it work” for when you really need it, rather than relying on it.

Stay engaged.
Don’t look at your questions.  Looking away says you aren’t interested.  It’s like talking to someone who keeps looking at their phone.  When a subject doesn’t have someone to look in the eye, they remember that they’re surrounded by lights and cameras and that will show it their face on camera.  You may need to check a list, but never when the person is talking.  Look them in the eye and nod with approval when your subject makes a great comment.  They want to know they’re doing well and it shows on camera when they’re confident with their comments.   It also teaches them what you are looking for.   It’s instant gratification that leads to making more good comments.

Shut up and listen.
After you’ve asked the question, don’t feel like you have to fill the silence.  Let them fill it.  Give them that head tilt and an inquisitive look to tell them you want more information.   We all have visual signs in conversation that communicates what we want.   Show them you approve, are excited by what they are saying and that you want more info – without using a single word.   

Interviewing has been fun for me.   I love talking with people and learning things.  That makes it easier too.   

Todd Joyce has the gift of gab, but gab isn’t as much of an asset as an interviewer.  He’s working on his listening skills.  Find Todd on FB and LinkedIn.

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

The Daily Edit – Mossless: Romke Hoogwaerts/ Grace Leigh

A Photo Editor's Blog - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 10:11am

1 cover copy

Stephen Tamiesie

3 ~man&nature copy

( left to right ) Amy Stein, Cait Opperman, Thomas Prior, Trevor Paglan, Jessica Auer, Michael Itkoff, George Underwood

4 Landeros copy

Kathya Landeros

5 ~mining,Kaneps copy

( left to right )  Suzanna Zak and Justin Kaneps

6 Shea copy

Daniel Shea

7 Evans,~industry copy

 ( left to right ) Terry Evans and Carson Gilliland

9 Foglia copy

Lucas Foglia

10 ~domesticdebris copy

( left to right ) Nich Hance Mcelroy, Eric Ruby, Mo Castello, McNair Evans

19 Yahlring,~desolation copy

( left to right )  Keith Yahrling, Andrew Bruah, Lisa Kereszi

unnamed

 Corey Olsen


Mossless

Founder: Romke Hoogwaerts
Partner: Grace Leigh

Heidi: What brought about Mossless magazine?

Romke: As a kid growing up abroad I had become attached to various online communities, one of which was photography. I loved photography, had wanted to be a photographer but I saw early on how hard of a career path it would be, regardless of talent. I wanted to study cinematography, but I also wanted to work in publishing. Once I realised that it would also be very hard for me to even get my foot in any door in publishing if I were to go down this other path, it struck me that I might as well try to develop my own. So I started a blog and soon interviewed a photographer every two days, preparing for a day where I might print a book of someone else’s photos.

Grace: I joined Romke in Mossless in February of 2012 when we started seeing one another. At first just to help packing and shipping copies of the first issue, which had just been released. I quickly became very interested in the project, being somewhat new to New York and the contemporary photography scene—I was raised by two documentary photographers—and found it to be an incredible crash course in everything from daily scouring the internet for content to book design and binding to handling distribution of our print issues. It’s been an incredible learning experience.


What is the best way for online and print photography to complement each other?

Romke: That’s a great question! A lot of newspapers and magazines would sure love to know the answer. I don’t know if I have it either but I do know that since it’s still hard to monetize web content, one should refrain from putting valuable work on there… unless you have some cunning secret interface that has it figured out. I think it’ll take a bit of a change of perspective on the value of content access across the whole internet before this conundrum is really solved. And who knows, some day soon our access to the internet may no longer need backlit screens, maybe then the internet will look more like it’s on paper, which could make physical books totally redundant!

In your mind, what are the differences between imagery that exits online vs print and what are the benefits to each? 

Grace: I find that seeing images online is generally more of a passive act, the images come to you through whatever host you happen to be using (tumblr, Flickr, etc) and can easily get buried or overpowered by the multitude of images moving past your eyes. For that reason in particular I think it’s an excellent place to get acquainted with different trends and movements and for sourcing work to put together collections of images. The appeal of print for me is the tangibility of it and the sort of ritualistic act associated with looking through a book or a magazine. By choosing to leaf through a collection of images you are taking a much more active role in viewing, it’s deliberate. There are so many amazing images online, print just gives them a place to live so they can be revisited again and again.

Romke: It’s a thrill to explore images online, as long as you know where to look to find stuff that will surprise and reveal new things, which isn’t too hard considering how many people across the world take part. With print, it’s a thing of ownership, or belonging and solidarity to a mentality. People buy books so that their contents can become a part of them in some way. It’s a potent feeling that is impossible to have online. Beyond the feeling of ownership and belonging I’d say that main difference is simply in an image’s illumination and resolution. Some images look spectacular backlit, others are best found matte and on paper. Some photos lend well to a calculated sequence, controllable in print, others suit the chaos online. It makes for quite a neat contrast. What really tips the balance, though, is exposure to the public. Books are limited in number, resources and by tangibility. An image online is at once at risk of being seen by no-one and by the whole world.

How many images did each photographer submit for the magazine?

Romke:  We didn’t really take submissions, we requested specific photos that we saw on their websites or blogs. We invited them to add any others they thought would be fitting. I think that most photographers sent an average of about six or seven photographs. Some sent just two or three, some sent about twenty.

What was your editing criteria?

Romke:  Once we had our huge folder of photos, we printed them all out, labeled them, and tried to organize them by loose categories like commerce, industry, rural, urban, and so on. We used those loose categories as groupings that we could move through and we tried to find ways to connect the different themes in a visual way. We had requested a number of photographs that would fall under  “on the road” which we used quite a bit to connect these themes. It was really hard. We created a few rules for ourselves and we broke them frequently in this mad goal of finding some kind of pure sequence.

Overall what was your theme for this issue?

Grace: The theme was photographs taken in the United States over a ten year period, as seen by a chorus of different photographers. It was our goal to create a survey of new american photography so we published a range of works from amateur  photographers we found on flickr to professional photographers with already published works, our only strict criteria that it be taken between 2003-2013 and that the work had already been published online. 

I know you’re developing a fly-on-the-wall/interview type video, which may be turned into a series, when can we look forward to that and how would we find it?

Grace: Yes! We’re really excited about our new project. We’re currently editing that video, which should go online within the next month. I wish I could say more, but I really shouldn’t!

Categories: Business

5 Suggestions for More Effective Interviews

ASMP's Strictly Business - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 12:01am

[by Charles Gupton]

The ability to ask good questions and draw people out of their anxiety over being photographed has always been an important skill set to have as a still photographer.

But over the past several years, I’ve gone from being behind the camera exclusively to taking a more active role in interviewing subjects for motion projects — and more recently, a podcast where I interview creative leaders.

As a result, there are a number of interviewing skills I’ve needed to refine and improve. Here are 5 suggestions for making a significant difference in the quality of your interviews:

  • Do your research.
    Start with defining “why” you’re doing the interview and “who” is going to benefit from it.
    Ask yourself, “What would the viewer or listener want to know?” Then, ask the questions that draw out those answers. Knowing why you’re asking questions will help you know which specific questions to ask.  Also, by investing a few hours to get to know your subject, you’ll gain an understanding of what that person has to offer that’s relevant to your audience.
  • Ask open-ended questions that require a more complete response than a close-ended “Yes” or “No.”
    An example of a close-ended question is, “I understand you and your spouse enjoy riding a tandem bike on weekends. Is that true?” An open-ended inquiry might be phrased, “I understand you and your spouse enjoy tandem bike rides on weekends. Tell me about one of your recent rides and what made it so special.” This will likely bring a more revealing response that will provide more depth and probably a better rapport.
  • If you want better answers, prepare better questions by writing them out in advance.
    Writing helps order your thinking when you’re not under pressure in the moment. Also, if your time is cut from one hour for an appointment to 15 minutes because of a schedule conflict, you’ll know the most important questions to cover and not be rattled by the last minute change. President Dwight Eisenhower once said: “In preparing for battle, I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.” You may not use the questions you prepared exactly the way you prepared them, but your planning will be indispensable when you’re in the moment and the pressure is on.
  • Your mood and emotions set the tone for the interview.
    If you’re anxious, you’ll likely communicate anxiety. If you are calm, it’s likely your subject will be calm. Your subjects usually mirror the emotions that you display.
  • Be present and listen.
    Too often we have an agenda and a next question to ask, missing the opportunity to go deeper because we are not in the moment. Resist the temptation to jump ahead. By listening and more fully giving your subject your attention, they feel heard and willing to speak more intimately than if you’re just looking to check off your list and get the interview done.

If you have any responses based on your experience or tips that you want to add, please share them in the comments.

Based in Raleigh, N.C., Charles uncovers stories that resonate, then tells them in three-minute films to engage clients for business on the web. His newest venture, The Creator’s Journey podcast, will launch by April 2015.

cg@charlesguptonphoto.com | www.charlesguptonphoto.com | www.charlesgupton.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

The Daily Promo: Ryan Nicholson

A Photo Editor's Blog - Mon, 03/23/2015 - 10:53am

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Ryan Nicholson

Who printed it?
It was printed by Spangler Graphics in Kansas City where I am based.

 Who designed it?
Designed by Kirk Lakebrink a Kansas City based designer.

Who edited the images?
Edited by myself and JP Perlmutter an artist consultant.

How many did you make?
We printed 275 copies of the piece and I mailed out 220. I will use the remaining pieces as leave behinds at portfolio shows, etc…

How many times a year do you send out promos?
For the past two years I have sent out 6 direct mail pieces a year (basically one every other month) and this year I am going to do them quarterly.

Where did your idea of women and hoops come from?
It is a long story on how I ended up shooting the piece but I will try and summarize. I played high school and college basketball. I graduated with a history degree and started my professional career as a high school history teacher/basketball coach. I taught and coached in Moore, Oklahoma then in Kansas City, Missouri and finally out in Phoenix, Arizona. The last year that I taught in Phoenix I actually switched from teaching history to photography but through a combination of teaching burnout and revitalized interest in photography (my father was a photographer) I decided not to renew my teaching contract and to give photography my full time attention. I started as a stringer for a couple small newspapers in Phoenix and my business has grown and shifted in a variety of ways over the past ten plus years. I am now based in my hometown of Kansas City, Missouri shooting a mixture of editorial and commercial work.

Despite my career change away from coaching I have always maintained a love and interest in basketball and decided over this past year that I wanted to dedicate some time and attention to shooting it specifically. I had a trip scheduled to New York for portfolio shows last summer and was digging around for information on the street basketball scene in the city. I found a documentary on NYC street basketball called “Doin’ it in the Park” on Netflix which led me to their Facebook page. I was looking at the film’s Facebook page and saw a post about a group of women that play pick up ball every Sunday at Goat Park in the upper west side. I found that “Ladies Who Hoop” Facebook page and sent a message to the organizer asking if I could come and photograph them while I was visiting. The organizer Amber Batchelor welcomed me with open arms and I spent a good portion of a Sunday photographing the group while I was in town.

The second part of my interest in photographing the women was my desire to create images of women in a manner that shows them as strong, athletic, etc….I have two young daughters and any opportunity that I have to use my time and talents to document women that are strong and pushing boundaries I consider time well spent. I have to say watching the women take over one of the courts in a prominent New York City park was really cool to watch and document. I am in the planning stages of another trip there and will definitely go back and photograph the group again.

Read more in SLAM Magazine here
 

Categories: Business

Selfishly, Selflessly Interviewing

ASMP's Strictly Business - Mon, 03/23/2015 - 12:02am

[by Colleen Wainwright]

For most of my career, I’ve been the interviewee more often than I have the interviewer. And everything I’ve learned from being the subject has taught me that the easier and more interesting I make things for the person I’m interviewing, the more fun we both have, and the better the end result. This boils down to a few simple things.

First, I do my research. So far, I’ve only interviewed people I’ve already got some interest in. Yet before I walk into the actual interview, I do an additional two to 10 hours of research. This way, when we do sit down, we can jump into connecting the dots much faster–discussing the “why” behind things, rather than the “what”. There’s no point to using my interview subject as a human Google; that’s what Google is for.

Second, I ask greedy questions. Again, for the most part, I’m interviewing people whose brains I really want to pick. So when I talk to Shane Nickerson, fellow Groundlings alum and very successful producer, selfishly I want to know how he got from where we were to where he is, instead of where I am. (Not least of which because I already know the answer to that!) Provided I’ve done my due diligence prior to the meeting, a “selfish” interview ends up being far more interesting to both of us, because, forced to connect dots, the subject ends up learning about his own processes, which are often internalized to the point of invisibility.

Finally, I keep the end in mind. Whether I’m interviewing someone for my column or a client for their website copy, I try to think of the ideal consumer for this information, and what special insights or details might delight them. What problems does this reader have that they need solved? What obstacles already faced and lessons learned would inspire and motivate them? In addition to being more helpful to the end user, it also gives the subject a warm feeling inside, knowing that what they’ve learned can make a difference for someone else.

Bonus link: I love these interviewing tips from veteran journalist (and friend) Daphne Gray-Grant–lifted from a text-messaging crisis prevention hotline!

Colleen Wainwright is a writer and sometime-interviewer who lives in Los Angeles. She loves everything about interviews, except transcribing them.

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

The Art of the Interview

ASMP's Strictly Business - Mon, 03/23/2015 - 12:01am

More and more photographers are spending more and more their time doing something many of us never imagined – interviewing our subjects, not just for our own interest or to help them relax, but as part of the motion or multi-media project we’re working on.  This week, our contributors offer advice, tips and resources to help you develop better interview questions, elicit great sound bites, build rapport with your subjects, and edit interviews more effectively.

 

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

This Week In Photography Books: Andy Freeberg

A Photo Editor's Blog - Fri, 03/20/2015 - 9:57am

by Jonathan Blaustein

I got a lot of good feedback on last week’s review. Honestly, I wasn’t that surprised. Who doesn’t love to read the ramblings of a slightly deranged mind?

It was as if I were Raskolnikov for a few moments. Fleetingly crazy, only without the menace. Who knew what I might say? I could have written the whole thing stark naked, having a laugh at everyone’s expense, and no one would have been the wiser.

This week, however, I’ve moved past the pain-killer phase of this particular illness. As two of my students correctly predicted, it migrated from my throat to my chest. Now, I have bronchitis, which is less painful, but more annoying.

All day long, I’ve been hocking up phlegm.
Cough. Cough. Chest boogers.
Cough. Cough. Chest boogers.

Not. exactly. sexy.

And yet, as I said last week, the trains must run on time. Books must be reviewed. Content must be produced. It is the way of the 21st Century, and who am I to question reality?

(Were I still in the Dostoyesvky-impersonating phase, I might do just that. “The world. It is bleak. People. They are dark, miserable animals. Happiness is an illusion. We are all capable of murder. Why go on living? What is the point? I really should kill myself. Or better yet, someone else. They don’t deserve to live. I hate them. I love them. I am thoroughly confused.”)

Are you confused? Shall I make things less complicated for you?

How’s this? Andy Freeberg’s new book “Art Fare,” published by Sojourn, is awesome and hilarious, in a dry, insider-kind-of-way. He laughs at the type of powerful, humorless people that normally intimidate the shit out of regular folks like us: Contemporary Art Dealers, and their bespectacled minions.

This book requires little explication, which is why it is perfect for today. The pictures below will amuse you, for certain, and allow me to wrap this column up quickly, so I can go back to my obnoxious, Russian-level suffering.

Cough. Cough. Chest boogers.

The pictures were made in the Miami Art Fairs, and feature gallery owners and workers in front of the goods they buy, sell and trade. Not much to figure out.

There are connections between the people and the art, occasionally. Like the guy in front of his own painting, with his wiener hanging out.

But what I really loved was the fact that almost all of these people have adopted the kind of affected, bored-of-the-world, I’d rather check my Iphone than stare at a wall, I’m-better-than-you-are kind of postures. It makes you want to punch them in the face, collectively, but then, not really. They’re just flawed human beings, as are we.

Everyone gets bored, I suppose, and if you stare at the art too long, perhaps your mind will explode.

I’m sure they’re secretly insecure, these Art World Denizens, and trying to fit in, like the rest of us. So they wear faded black T-shirts, like their buddies do, and pretend not to care. (Like their buddies do.)

Bill Hunt, who writes an essay, is also featured in a photograph,
at his former gallery Hasted Hunt Krautler. In fairness, his pose affects no such ennui. (Which really ought to be a Russian word, instead of French. Don’t you think?)

He ends with Chuck Close, in his wheelchair, looking at an Andy Warhol “Soup Can” on the wall. What a great way to “close” a book. Perfect, really.

Blaustein out.

Bottom Line: Hilarious, well-observed investigation of the Art-World-Gorillas in their natural habitat

To Purchase “Art Fare” Visit Photo-Eye

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Books are provided by Photo-Eye in exchange for links back for purchase.

Books are found in the bookstore and submissions are not accepted.

Categories: Business

The Magic of Vision

ASMP's Strictly Business - Fri, 03/20/2015 - 12:01am

[by Chris Winton-Stahle]

Finding Your Vision

It’s easy to get sidetracked from your career goals and there are a whole list of good reasons why it happens. Sometimes an artist has to reinvent themselves because their niche has dried up or they feel creatively unchallenged. Children are born or a parent needs caring for. It’s all completely understandable. This is the nature of life after all. While we’re busy making a living we sometimes lose faith and sight of our dreams.

It’s not easy going after what you want – it can be lonely, scary, confusing and expensive. Success can happen fast, slow, or never. We don’t always know what’s going to work and we don’t all have the luxury to wait and see. But it’s worth it – deep down you know who you are and that person has to get out!

There’s an instinct in your gut that tells you what feels right and what feels wrong. Finding your vision as an artist requires being honest with yourself and those around you. Add to that a whole lot of perseverance and luck.

It’s important to stay inspired. It’s important to take time to play! That is where the passion and love for photography lives! Use  your personal down time to explore and express your ideas, to discover what you love about how you see. Experiment, play, make mistakes. What makes you tick? What gets you excited about photography? There’s no wrong answer! Figure out what interests you and start to build a body of work around that. This will be the beginning of a new portfolio which is uniquely you. From there, look for creative ways to apply your unique vision to your market.

Marketing Your Vision

You should always reach out to people and companies that you want to work with and tell them how excited your are about what they’re doing. Shoot personally produced projects that would be interesting to those brands. You want the people associated with your dream clients to say, “Wow, I can see this being used for our advertising!” It’s amazing how well people will respond to you when they know that you sincerely believe in them.

Sometimes it helps to work with a consultant who can help you refine your unique vision and who knows the market well enough to help you build a portfolio directed toward genres that fit well with your style. Once your style has evolved to a certain point, a consultant can usually help you find ways to make the market chase you. If you refine your style to the point where you become known as the one person who does that one thing better than anyone else, then you will be in demand and can set your price!

You don’t have to know all the steps necessary to get to your goal, just the next one. Paths reveal themselves over time. If you are working hard to find your style, exploring possibilities and being true to yourself as an artist then you are always exactly where you’re supposed to be. Remain flexible and patient. Take your next step, see what happens and enjoy the ride!

Listen to what your heart is telling you to do and produce work you’re passionate about. The people hiring you want to see that passion. They want to know who you are as a person!

The best art – and photography is an art – comes from artists who have poured their heart and soul into the work they’re creating. Exceptional work comes from artists who are not afraid to show personality and vulnerability. Honing your unique vision often requires a lot of exploration and experimentation. But when you’re focusing on creating work you love to make and putting it out into the world then you eventually attract the kind of work you want to be doing. It’s like magic!

© Christopher Winton-Stahle. Let your vision carry you to the destination of your dreams.

© Christopher Winton-Stahle. Let your vision carry you to the destination of your dreams.

Chris Winton-Stahle is an award-winning photographer and accomplished photo illustration artist who sees the camera as only half of his process in creating great imagery. Chris often pulls components from multiple images and CGI when creating his work for clients in advertising, magazines and entertainment.

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

The Art of the Personal Project: Dennis Stevens

A Photo Editor's Blog - Thu, 03/19/2015 - 11:18am

As a former Art Producer, I have always been drawn to personal projects because they are the sole vision of the photographer and not an extension of an art director, photo editor, or graphic designer. This new column, “The Art of the Personal Project” will feature the personal projects of photographers using the Yodelist marketing database. You can read their blog at http://yodelist.wordpress.com. Projects are discovered online and submissions are not accepted.

Today’s featured photographer is: Dennis Stevens

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AllMenAreBornEqualThenAHandfulBecomeFirefighters

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DreamBigandDareToFail

IntoTheSmokeWeGo

MorningDuties

StayLowMoveFast

T61ToWinterPark

TheMinuteBeforeYouGoIn

VentEnterSearch

YouNeverKnowIfTheNextCallWillBeYourLast

How long have you been shooting?
I have been shooting for close to eight years now with three of those being professional.

Are you self-taught or photography school taught?
I am completely self taught through experimentation.

With this particular project, what was your inspiration to shoot it?
Growing up, I always had a strong fascination with firefighters. Last summer I took the initiative to speak with the local fire chief about my photography and he granted me the privilege of working alongside his firefighters. I spent nearly a week trying to get a sense of how I was going to capture such a powerful subject, but in the end it turned out fantastic.

How many years have you been shooting this project before you decided to present it?
This project began last July, and I released the first set of images in mid-august.

How long do you spend on a personal project before deciding if it is working?
It truly depends on the subject that I am capturing. Traditionally, I will spend around three days to determine if I connect with the subject, if not I normally abandon the idea until a later date.

Since shooting for your portfolio is different from personal work, how do you feel when the work is different?
I am very selective in the work I choose to publish in my portfolio. Portfolio work for me has to be perfect in quality, while my personal projects don’t have too high of standard since I am just expressing myself.

Have you ever posted your personal work on social media venues such as Reddit, Tumblr, Instagram or Facebook?
I present my work on different venues depending on the subject matter. For example, I posted this project nearly everywhere I could including the firefighting sub-reddit.

If so, has the work ever gone viral and possibly with great press?
My work with first responders has gone viral within the firefighting community. As of January 2015, my series had received over half a million views as a result of social media sharing. Although with a lot of viral images out there, only a couple thousand of viewers knew that I was the photographer.

Have you printed your personal projects for your marketing to reach potential clients?
At this point, I have not. Although, I plan to create multiple promotional pieces that I will distribute to agencies this summer to introduce my brand.

—————-

Dennis Stevens is an eighteen year old photographer based in Orlando, FL. He specializes in lifestyle, advertising, and performance photography with a hard focus on first responders. He is network driven and loves to create work with new clients. He has been shooting commercial photography freelance for the past three years while attending high school. He has been regarded by the greats of his industry as ambitious and someone who will make his mark.

His work with first responders has been widely recognized in the first responder industry. His continuous series highlighting the Winter Park Fire Department has been viewed by nearly half-a-million people worldwide as a consequence of social media sharing. His most recent campaign with Honeywell International received the attention of nearly twenty-thousand viewers within the period of a work week.


APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world. She has been involved in the photography and illustration industry since the mid 80s, after establishing the art buying department at The Martin Agency then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies. She has a new Twitter feed with helpful marketing information believing that marketing should be driven by a brand and not specialty. Follow her on twitter at SuzanneSease.

Categories: Business

The Art of the Personal Project: Dennis Stevens

A Photo Editor's Blog - Thu, 03/19/2015 - 10:55am

As a former Art Producer, I have always been drawn to personal projects because they are the sole vision of the photographer and not an extension of an art director, photo editor, or graphic designer. This new column, “The Art of the Personal Project” will feature the personal projects of photographers using the Yodelist marketing database. You can read their blog at http://yodelist.wordpress.com. Projects are discovered online and submissions are not accepted.

Today’s featured photographer is: Dennis Stevens

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0423689e74497094d560ad945b540e95-1

20141223-Day 3IMGL3302

20141227-Day 5IMGL9809

20141227-Day 5IMGL9844

AllMenAreBornEqualThenAHandfulBecomeFirefighters

Batallion61OnScene

DreamBigandDareToFail

IntoTheSmokeWeGo

MorningDuties

StayLowMoveFast

T61ToWinterPark

TheMinuteBeforeYouGoIn

VentEnterSearch

YouNeverKnowIfTheNextCallWillBeYourLast

How long have you been shooting?
I have been shooting for close to eight years now with three of those being professional.

Are you self-taught or photography school taught?
I am completely self taught through experimentation.

With this particular project, what was your inspiration to shoot it?
Growing up, I always had a strong fascination with firefighters. Last summer I took the initiative to speak with the local fire chief about my photography and he granted me the privilege of working alongside his firefighters. I spent nearly a week trying to get a sense of how I was going to capture such a powerful subject, but in the end it turned out fantastic.

How many years have you been shooting this project before you decided to present it?
This project began last July, and I released the first set of images in mid-august.

How long do you spend on a personal project before deciding if it is working?
It truly depends on the subject that I am capturing. Traditionally, I will spend around three days to determine if I connect with the subject, if not I normally abandon the idea until a later date.

Since shooting for your portfolio is different from personal work, how do you feel when the work is different?
I am very selective in the work I choose to publish in my portfolio. Portfolio work for me has to be perfect in quality, while my personal projects don’t have too high of standard since I am just expressing myself.

Have you ever posted your personal work on social media venues such as Reddit, Tumblr, Instagram or Facebook?
I present my work on different venues depending on the subject matter. For example, I posted this project nearly everywhere I could including the firefighting sub-reddit.

If so, has the work ever gone viral and possibly with great press?
My work with first responders has gone viral within the firefighting community. As of January 2015, my series had received over half a million views as a result of social media sharing. Although with a lot of viral images out there, only a couple thousand of viewers knew that I was the photographer.

Have you printed your personal projects for your marketing to reach potential clients?
At this point, I have not. Although, I plan to create multiple promotional pieces that I will distribute to agencies this summer to introduce my brand.

—————-

Dennis Stevens is an eighteen year old photographer based in Orlando, FL. He specializes in lifestyle, advertising, and performance photography with a hard focus on first responders. He is network driven and loves to create work with new clients. He has been shooting commercial photography freelance for the past three years while attending high school. He has been regarded by the greats of his industry as ambitious and someone who will make his mark.

His work with first responders has been widely recognized in the first responder industry. His continuous series highlighting the Winter Park Fire Department has been viewed by nearly half-a-million people worldwide as a consequence of social media sharing. His most recent campaign with Honeywell International received the attention of nearly twenty-thousand viewers within the period of a work week.


APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world. She has been involved in the photography and illustration industry since the mid 80s, after establishing the art buying department at The Martin Agency then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies. She has a new Twitter feed with helpful marketing information believing that marketing should be driven by a brand and not specialty. Follow her on twitter at SuzanneSease.

Categories: Business

Vision + Values = Long-term Success

ASMP's Strictly Business - Thu, 03/19/2015 - 12:01am

[by Carolyn Potts]

Talent and smart marketing are both critical to sustain your career. But they are much more powerful when they are allied with your vision and values.

A vision-based business is tied to your core values. Values become the foundation of your vision statement which is something broader and deeper than “I want to make a bunch of money.” Or “I want to get published in X” or “shoot for Y.”

I discovered this by accident. I never sat down and wrote a vision statement. But if I had, it would have said: “I love being the connecting link between two sets of innovative and creative people. Introducing creative people who need to know about each other is a total blast.”

Even though I didn’t write it down, it helped knowing this because without intending to, I ended up making a boatload of money. I was a rep for decades because I really enjoyed working with photographers and art directors–no matter what their budgets.

Some reps who were in it only for the money bailed during the inevitable economic downturns. For them, it was hard to stay in a high-stress business like ad photography when they weren’t getting paid well. My rep firm ended up having staying power. I generated trust among my clients. And trust builds repeat business.

It’s the same with the photographers I know who have survived multiple recessions. Their shooting styles have evolved, but it’s their focus on their core values that have allowed them to survive.

A photographer I know who began his career in the early-1980s is still going strong because his business is based on a deeply sincere love of people. Whether getting a $10,000 fee for an advertising image or a getting $250 for a local headshot, the way he approaches each portrait is exactly the same: he ‘s always 100% present and is happy being with each of his subjects. There’s no ego and no attention paid to what he’s getting paid to shoot. Everyone senses that when in front of his lens. And that’s why he gets tons of repeat business.

Your values should be apparent in your vision and your vision will keep your own and others eyes on your values.

Carolyn Potts, photography marketing consultant, speaker, workshop leader and former photographers’ rep, guides photographers in creating their successful vision-based careers that garner them great money along the way. Find her at www.cpotts.com and Facebook and Google+

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

I Don’t Object To Staging – The Honesty Lies In My Ability To Understand

A Photo Editor's Blog - Wed, 03/18/2015 - 11:09am

I remember your picture of a Spanish woman throwing water into the street. Was this staged?

A. I would not have hesitated to ask her to throw the water. (I don’t object to staging if and only if I feel that it is an intensification of something that is absolutely authentic to the place.)

Q. Cartier-Bresson never asks for this…. Why do you break this basic rule of candid photography?

A. I didn’t write the rules — why should I follow them? Since I put a great deal of time and research to know what I am about? I ask and arrange if I feel it is legitimate. The honesty lies in my — the photographer’s — ability to understand.

Q. Why do you print your own pictures?

A. The same reason a great writer doesn’t turn his draft over to a secretary… I will retouch.

via Discussing Honesty in Imagery – NYTimes.com.

Categories: Business

I Don’t Object To Staging – The Honesty Lies In My Ability To Understand

A Photo Editor's Blog - Wed, 03/18/2015 - 11:09am

I remember your picture of a Spanish woman throwing water into the street. Was this staged?

A. I would not have hesitated to ask her to throw the water. (I don’t object to staging if and only if I feel that it is an intensification of something that is absolutely authentic to the place.)

Q. Cartier-Bresson never asks for this…. Why do you break this basic rule of candid photography?

A. I didn’t write the rules — why should I follow them? Since I put a great deal of time and research to know what I am about? I ask and arrange if I feel it is legitimate. The honesty lies in my — the photographer’s — ability to understand.

Q. Why do you print your own pictures?

A. The same reason a great writer doesn’t turn his draft over to a secretary… I will retouch.

via Discussing Honesty in Imagery – NYTimes.com.

Categories: Business

A Photographers Vision is “selbstverständlich”

ASMP's Strictly Business - Wed, 03/18/2015 - 12:01am

[by Pascal Depuhl]

Vision is one of those uniquely personal experiences. Your vision is just ‘selbstverständlich” as we say in German. (Sorry, but there’s no really good translation for this word. Literally translated it means “understandable on its own.”) Your vision just goes without saying (the official translation). You know your vision when you see it. You just get it. It’s a part of you, but if you had to explain it to others you’d be hard-pressed.

Your vision
Your vision is your North Star, your guiding light. That internal beacon that draws you to do what you do. However, you can also have ‘smaller’ visions as well – some are project specific, others may drive something as self contained as a single photograph. Each one of those visions lets you see the finished state of something before it exists. Jonathan Swift called Vision “the art of seeing that what’s invisible to others.”

Swift knows a thing or two about vision being the art of seeing what’s invisible to others. After all, he wrote about the two moons of Mars in the third voyage of Gulliver’s Travels in 1726, 150 years before the moons were discovered.

Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech. Deimos and Phobos, the 2 moons of Mars, in comparison to ours.

Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech. Deimos and Phobos, the 2 moons of Mars, in comparison to ours.

Your client’s vision
But what about your client’s vision? As visual content creators we are in the unique place of wielding tools that allow us to make other people’s visions visible. The best complement an Art Director can give me is to look at the image or video we just collaborated on and say “That’s exactly what I saw in my mind.”

As a side note, the ability to create a physical image of someone else’s vision is one of the main reasons people hire professional image creators. Last time I checked, there’s no app for that.

Your client’s customer’s vision
Don’t forget to consider your client’s customers. An artist is “someone, who refreshes your vision,” reigniting it and setting that celestial body on fire. As artists we do this all day long. We create images with impact and videos that can change people’s minds in a matter of minutes, often driving a sale or a change in behavior that our clients wish to encourage in their customers.

One last word of caution: If all you have is vision, then you’re only a dreamer who has his head in the clouds and isn’t gonna accomplish anything much. There are two more vital pieces to affecting your clients with your vision – check them out at TEDx “The Art of Changing Minds” and see if you agree.

Pascal Depuhl followed his vision, went to Afghanistan and produced a mind changing documentary “On Wings of Hope.” Pascal tells you the other two vital ingredients, that are absolutely necessary to bring your vision to life, in his TEDx talk “The Art of Changing Minds“. Let him know the most insane thing your vision has ever made you do in the comments or on twitter @photosbydepuhl, #InsaneVision

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

The Daily Edit – Portland Monthly: Michael Novak

A Photo Editor's Blog - Tue, 03/17/2015 - 10:21am

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Screen Shot 2015-03-15 at 3.30.43 PM

Portland Monthly

Art Director: Michael Novak
Photographer: Andy Batt

How often do you have celebrities on the cover? Is this a unique cover story?
This is actually almost unheard of for Portland Monthly. As a city mag, our covers tend to stick to standard tropes such as Best Restaurants, Travel, Schools, Real Estate, etc. Occasionally we experiment with more “newsy” subject matter, but those covers have typically fared poorly on newsstand. And more specifically, our covers almost never feature actual people, except in cases where they’re fairly anonymous, eating in a restaurant or hiking a mountain; our readership responds better to more tried and true reader service. In the 8 years I’ve worked here, we’ve published only three celebrity covers—so it was definitely an experiment to try this approach.

Is this an an annual theme: exceptional Oregon women?
We’ve never done this topic before. The subject was championed by one of our executive editors, Rachel Ritchie, and embraced by our founder, Nicole Vogel, who had experienced plenty of sexism herself in the process of raising capital to start this magazine 12 years ago. Nicole wrote an essay in the issue, about the disrespect she encountered in a city considered a bastion of liberalism.

What makes an exceptional woman for your title?
We chose women across multiple industries and geographies—all of them bravely innovating in their given fields. Our criteria was really just that the women included be doing impressive work that our readers didn’t necessarily know about. We wanted each profile to feel both surprising and inspiring, from the chief of staff for the Governor to a death row investigator to Portland’s first female head brewer.

How did the concept evolve, was it hooked on the idea of these women being pioneers?
The concept was always tied to the pioneering spirit of Oregon women; from a journalist’s perspective, it’s just such a rich subject with so much material to work with. The feature’s evolution was mainly due to our selection of individuals to profile and the format those profiles would take. We could’ve easily made a whole magazine on this subject—we started with a list of more than 100 women to whittle down to 10—so the real challenge was smartly editing our aspirations and limiting the feature to the 13 pages available.

What made you choose Andy Batt for this project?
Andy brings the right skills to the table. He’s worked on many Portland Monthly projects over the years, from shooting a school bus of screaming 7-year olds (never try art directing 7-year olds!) to ballerinas to the March Fourth marching band. He always comes to a project looking to try something new, and though he’ll always execute the client’s ideas, he also brings his own. In the case of the Carrie Brownstein shoot we only had an hour with her, so we had to figure out an approach that was simple enough that we could get options for both the cover and the interior. We had conceived of a Northwest referencial set, with Carrie standing on the stump of a tree with a rough-hewn wooden background. But when I got to the set on the day of the shoot, Andy had commissioned a prop builder to assemble a green background made out of fanned fern leaves, another powerful NW visual. And in the end we went with his fern idea because it just made a better visual.

Do you ever have photographers from out of state shoot for you?
Typically no. Occasionally I’ll have someone from Seattle shoot for me, but honestly our coverage is tightly Oregon-focused and we are blessed with an abundance of local talent so I almost never have to hire from out of state. I often joke that Portland is where photographers come to retire. We seem to have more of them per capita than NY and LA. That’s probably not strictly accurate, but it’s gotta be close!

What’s the best way for photographers to get in touch with you?
The can email me at mnovak@pdxmonthly.com.

Buying a new website?
APhotoFolio.com builds portfolio websites for photographers.
Have a look (here).

Categories: Business

The Daily Edit – Portland Monthly: Michael Novack

A Photo Editor's Blog - Tue, 03/17/2015 - 10:21am

Screen Shot 2015-03-15 at 3.30.26 PM
Screen Shot 2015-03-15 at 3.30.43 PM

Portland Monthly

Art Director: Michael Novack
Photographer: Andy Batt

How often do you have celebrities on the cover? Is this a unique cover story?
This is actually almost unheard of for Portland Monthly. As a city mag, our covers tend to stick to standard tropes such as Best Restaurants, Travel, Schools, Real Estate, etc. Occasionally we experiment with more “newsy” subject matter, but those covers have typically fared poorly on newsstand. And more specifically, our covers almost never feature actual people, except in cases where they’re fairly anonymous, eating in a restaurant or hiking a mountain; our readership responds better to more tried and true reader service. In the 8 years I’ve worked here, we’ve published only three celebrity covers—so it was definitely an experiment to try this approach.

Is this an an annual theme: exceptional Oregon women?
We’ve never done this topic before. The subject was championed by one of our executive editors, Rachel Ritchie, and embraced by our founder, Nicole Vogel, who had experienced plenty of sexism herself in the process of raising capital to start this magazine 12 years ago. Nicole wrote an essay in the issue, about the disrespect she encountered in a city considered a bastion of liberalism.

What makes an exceptional woman for your title?
We chose women across multiple industries and geographies—all of them bravely innovating in their given fields. Our criteria was really just that the women included be doing impressive work that our readers didn’t necessarily know about. We wanted each profile to feel both surprising and inspiring, from the chief of staff for the Governor to a death row investigator to Portland’s first female head brewer.

How did the concept evolve, was it hooked on the idea of these women being pioneers?
The concept was always tied to the pioneering spirit of Oregon women; from a journalist’s perspective, it’s just such a rich subject with so much material to work with. The feature’s evolution was mainly due to our selection of individuals to profile and the format those profiles would take. We could’ve easily made a whole magazine on this subject—we started with a list of more than 100 women to whittle down to 10—so the real challenge was smartly editing our aspirations and limiting the feature to the 13 pages available.

What made you choose Andy Batt for this project?
Andy brings the right skills to the table. He’s worked on many Portland Monthly projects over the years, from shooting a school bus of screaming 7-year olds (never try art directing 7-year olds!) to ballerinas to the March Fourth marching band. He always comes to a project looking to try something new, and though he’ll always execute the client’s ideas, he also brings his own. In the case of the Carrie Brownstein shoot we only had an hour with her, so we had to figure out an approach that was simple enough that we could get options for both the cover and the interior. We had conceived of a Northwest referencial set, with Carrie standing on the stump of a tree with a rough-hewn wooden background. But when I got to the set on the day of the shoot, Andy had commissioned a prop builder to assemble a green background made out of fanned fern leaves, another powerful NW visual. And in the end we went with his fern idea because it just made a better visual.

Do you ever have photographers from out of state shoot for you?
Typically no. Occasionally I’ll have someone from Seattle shoot for me, but honestly our coverage is tightly Oregon-focused and we are blessed with an abundance of local talent so I almost never have to hire from out of state. I often joke that Portland is where photographers come to retire. We seem to have more of them per capita than NY and LA. That’s probably not strictly accurate, but it’s gotta be close!

What’s the best way for photographers to get in touch with you?
The can email me at mnovak@pdxmonthly.com.

Buying a new website?
APhotoFolio.com builds portfolio websites for photographers.
Have a look (here).

Categories: Business

The Value of Instinct

ASMP's Strictly Business - Tue, 03/17/2015 - 12:02am

[by Jenna Close]

In my experience, finding your vision is a journey without end. It’s a lifelong part of being a photographer.

Previously, my forays into finding my vision could probably be better described as “finding a style”. I would spend a lot of time looking at other people’s work, work that I was drawn to, work I would emulate. This was all well and good (and is in fact very useful), yet for a long time I struggled with frustration and creative block. The more I looked at what my peers were doing, the more I made comparisons and found myself lacking.

What I finally realized is that the process of finding a vision must be two-fold, and in spending so much time looking at what other people were doing I was ignoring the most important part: my own instinct. What was I curious about? What challenges did I enjoy? What stories did I want to tell? What intrigued me to the point where I couldn’t stop thinking about it? Where and what was I happiest shooting?

It sounds simple, but it took me a long time to come to this realization. This is a wonderful age in which we have access to so much, where images and video and cool projects are accessible to us, each and every minute of the day. These are fabulous sources of entertainment and inspiration, but they also make it easy to start down a road of unfair comparison.

A vision can certainly be informed by people we admire, but it must also be found by listening to and acting on the truth of whatever your gut is telling you.

Jenna Close recently returned from a solo trip to Jordan, which is the kind of thing that can happen when you listen to your gut. She’s a commercial photographer living in San Diego & working worldwide.

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

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