MISSION STATEMENT - This site is dedicated to professional music photographers. Our mission is to advocate sound business practices, warn against predatory client practices, provide helpful and educational resources, and foster a sense of community. All discussions related to capturing, processing, cataloging and licensing music photographs are welcome.

You are here

Business

World Press Photo Sets The Bar For Allowed Image Adjustments

A Photo Editor's Blog - Wed, 02/18/2015 - 11:15am

Bravo to World Press Photo for taking a leadership role in the debate of what levels of image enhancements, adjustments and manipulation are acceptable for photojournalism. As the winners of this years contest were announced the news that 20% of images that made the final round were rejected for “manipulation or careless post-processing” left many people with jaws agape.

You can engage in the debate with the links below (if you haven’t already), but I wanted to highlight what I think are very important changes in how image adjustments are viewed.

David Campbell, Secretary of the 2015 Photo Contest jury, tweeted out the following:

This means no significant material may be added or removed by either cloning or substantial toning.

— David Campbell (@davidc7) February 12, 2015

Jury based decision on outcome (whether significant material had been added or removed) irrespective of technique (cloning or toning) used.

— David Campbell (@davidc7) February 12, 2015

All images are processed. Levels of processing that do not add or remove content a matter for aesthetic judgement.

— David Campbell (@davidc7) February 12, 2015

Levels of processing that do not add or remove content a matter for aesthetic judgement, and do not break contest rule.

— David Campbell (@davidc7) February 12, 2015

This is a major departure from the old standard of “digital darkroom” which tried to allow old darkroom techniques used by many of the great photojournalists.

This departure is highlighted by Jury chairwoman, Michele McNally in a story on the lens blog titled “Debating the Rules and Ethics of Digital Photojournalism” where she states:

“digital is not film, it is data — and it requires a new and clear set of rules”

It’s also worth noting that World Press Photo called in all the RAW files for images in the penultimate round and then had independent experts perform forensics on the images and present their findings to the jury.

I think World Press Photo has taken some important steps this year in leading by example. The old darkroom technique of burning and dodging things out of your images are OUT but processes that adjust the aesthetics are IN.

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/02/17/world-press-photo-manipulation-ethics-of-digital-photojournalism

https://storify.com/davidc7/what-are-world-press-photos-rules-and-standards-on

http://blog.photoshelter.com/2015/02/world-press-photo-eliminates-20-percent-of-images-for-manipulation/

http://www.bjp-online.com/2015/02/image-manipulation-hits-world-press-photo/

http://time.com/3706626/world-press-photo-processing-manipulation-disqualified/

https://www.david-campbell.org/photography/manipulation-examples/

https://bitly.com/bundles/martijnkleppe/m

Categories: Business

World Press Photo Sets The Bar For Allowed Image Adjustments

A Photo Editor's Blog - Wed, 02/18/2015 - 11:15am

Bravo to World Press Photo for taking a leadership role in the debate of what levels of image enhancements, adjustments and manipulation are acceptable for photojournalism. As the winners of this years contest were announced the news that 20% of images that made the final round were rejected for “manipulation or careless post-processing” left many people with jaws agape.

You can engage in the debate with the links below (if you haven’t already), but I wanted to highlight what I think are very important changes in how image adjustments are viewed.

David Campbell, Secretary of the 2015 Photo Contest jury, tweeted out the following:

This means no significant material may be added or removed by either cloning or substantial toning.

— David Campbell (@davidc7) February 12, 2015

Jury based decision on outcome (whether significant material had been added or removed) irrespective of technique (cloning or toning) used.

— David Campbell (@davidc7) February 12, 2015

All images are processed. Levels of processing that do not add or remove content a matter for aesthetic judgement.

— David Campbell (@davidc7) February 12, 2015

Levels of processing that do not add or remove content a matter for aesthetic judgement, and do not break contest rule.

— David Campbell (@davidc7) February 12, 2015

This is a major departure from the old standard of “digital darkroom” which tried to allow old darkroom techniques used by many of the great photojournalists.

This departure is highlighted by Jury chairwoman, Michele McNally in a story on the lens blog titled “Debating the Rules and Ethics of Digital Photojournalism” where she states:

“digital is not film, it is data — and it requires a new and clear set of rules”

It’s also worth noting that World Press Photo called in all the RAW files for images in the penultimate round and then had independent experts perform forensics on the images and present their findings to the jury.

I think World Press Photo has taken some important steps this year in leading by example. The old darkroom technique of burning and dodging things out of your images are OUT but processes that adjust the aesthetics are IN.

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/02/17/world-press-photo-manipulation-ethics-of-digital-photojournalism

https://storify.com/davidc7/what-are-world-press-photos-rules-and-standards-on

http://blog.photoshelter.com/2015/02/world-press-photo-eliminates-20-percent-of-images-for-manipulation/

http://www.bjp-online.com/2015/02/image-manipulation-hits-world-press-photo/

http://time.com/3706626/world-press-photo-processing-manipulation-disqualified/

https://www.david-campbell.org/photography/manipulation-examples/

https://bitly.com/bundles/martijnkleppe/m

Categories: Business

How Clients Are Using Social Media to Find Photographers

ASMP's Strictly Business - Wed, 02/18/2015 - 12:01am

[by Pascal Depuhl]

It wasn’t that long ago, Social Media–at least as we know it today–didn’t exist. LinkedIn, one of the oldest networks, launched in 2003. I think we can safely ignore friendster and MySpace, which launched that same year, but that’s when this whole thing began. Now I’m an early adopter of Social Media, so my first LinkedIn profile went up in 2004.

Of course there have been many more networks since those early days and they’ve been constantly evolving over the past decade. (If you want to dive into the most common social networks and how to create content for them, check out Gary Vaynerchuck’s book titled “Jab, jab, jab, right hook.” It’s the best book I’ve read on Social Media.)

Can you afford to ignore 70% of the internet?

Today Social Media is a fact of running a business and like it or not, you have to have a presence on at least some of those networks. Every one of these sites cater to a different audience with a different demographic, so it does take a little homework to figure out where your clients congregate online, but –believe me– they do. An architecture photographer will be on different Social Media that a catalog shooter, but both of them need to be on social media today.

According to Pew Research over 70% of adult internet users are on Facebook. Now you can see that in two ways: 1) you can look at this as a crowded field with a ton of noise. How is anyone even going to hear what you have to say. Or you can see this as a marvelous marketing opportunity: one place to reach 7 of every 10 people.

How clients use social media

In my experience, today’s clients often find their visual content creators online in a simple Google search. Once they’ve found someone who’s work they like, I find that they now search that specific photographer or production house online and expect to find more than only your images. They want to make sure that they will like to work with you, and social media is the perfect place to get a feel for someone’s personality. I’ve had more than a few clients tell me that the reason they are hiring me, is because of who I am online.

How you should use social media

Social Media is the perfect place to let people get to know you. To see how you work and what you’re passionate about. It is not the place for the hard sell. The conversion from Facebook friend, Twitter follower or LinkedIn connection to a paying client needs to happen on your website. Rosh Sillars compares your online presence to a solar system: your website is the sun and all the other sites (your blog, your social media networks, ect.) revolve around it, gently pointing potential clients toward the website.

Rosh Switch2Social

ASMP member Rosh Sillars teaches a group of South Florida photographers about Social Media at #Switch2Social.

Rosh reiterated the same thing two weeks ago, when he revealed his Social Media Secrets at #Switch2Social, a workshop that ASMP South Florida sponsored. One of the local speakers we had was a creative director. “I no longer hire any creatives, who do not have a social media presence.” he told us. Ouch! In his words: “Social Media is a great way to find out if someone is a jerk.”

A decade ago your photos alone spoke for you. Heather Elder, a photo rep in California, tells her photographers, that “solely relying on your imagery to speak for you has become dangerous.” She goes on to say that “Adding your voice to that imagery is equally as dangerous, but for everyone else, not you.”

Social Media is the perfect place to make your voice heard.

Pascal Depuhl uses Social Media to show his work, but more importantly his brand to potential clients. See what you can learn about Social Media at #Switch2Social, where you can watch Rosh Sillars and a group of local experts share their secrets about Social Media: #Switch2Social: Social Media Secrets revealed with Rosh Sillars. Pascal is on Twitter @photosbydepuhl.

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

The Daily Edit – Bicycling Magazine: Jesse Southerland

A Photo Editor's Blog - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 9:14am
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.45.54 AM
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.46.08 AM
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.46.14 AM

Bicycling

Design and Photo Director: Jesse Southerland
Art Director: Colin McSherry
Designer: Jimmy Cavalieri

Heidi: I understand you do both the photo direction and the design direction which is becoming more often the norm. What are the benefits and the drawbacks in your eyes?

Jesse: Tighter photo budgets each year are no surprise for editorial photographers, but hopefully they can take some comfort in knowing that their clients are legitimately feeling that pinch as well. Yes, in my case I have absorbed the photo director responsibilities in addition to the design direction.
The benefits have been pretty rewarding actually. Being involved from start to finish allows for better communication without as much getting in lost in translation. There aren’t as many surprises (for the most part) when the edits come in. Overall there are less kill fees which unfortunately don’t even have their own budget lines anymore. We absorb that cost out of the real budget, so it’s crucial things go right the first time. In addition to better communication, I think the process is expedited with fewer people involved. I can get back to a photographer who is on set with direct, immediate feedback. They aren’t stuck waiting as long as they would with the workflow of a traditional art department. Also, when pre shoot problems pop up I can generally get back to them within a few hours as opposed to the next day which was often the case before.
It obviously isn’t all roses. Make no mistake, there wouldn’t be a blog of this name if photo editors’ weren’t crucial to most magazines. I’m stretched extremely thin. I’m used to working ahead, but now it isn’t uncommon to be working on 4-5 issues at once every day. The time needed for photo research is greatly reduced. I love having tried and true photographers, but I miss having the time to dig deeper and find younger photographers with a completely fresh and inspiring outlook on the assignments. I feed off of their excitement and hunger. The time spent designing is the time most sacrificed. I can always pull an all nighter to lay out a feature, but I can’t stay up all night and magically produce all of the photos. So the time spent photo directing is more important for me to focus on in most cases.
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.44.54 AM
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.44.58 AM
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.45.04 AM
I see you have some international coverage, how are you sourcing those photographers in such remote places?
For Dario Pegoretti story, we needed him shot in his small studio in the middle of nowhere in Italy for that issue. This stuff is probably another day in the life of a regular photo editor, but it obviously takes more research and logistical communication than the average shoot. I basically scoured through Wired Italia for the coolest portraits and found Max&Douglas who lived somewhat close. They absolutely fell in love with Dario and produced some great photographs. Again, nothing crazy for a photo editor, but a huge victory in my position with such limited resources.
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.46.33 AM
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.46.56 AM
What’s your approach to the overall photo direction of the magazine?
The photo direction is identical to the design direction which is identical to the editorial direction. Everything at BICYCLING is about being exciting, fun, fit, authentic and real. Ideally the photography will contain most of those attributes, but as long as the photo nails at least one of those descriptions we are good, but it has to really nail it. I am most intrigued by authentic and real. Bicycling photography can go really wrong really quick. You may have a really authentic looking person to shoot, but then they put on their outfit, then a helmet, then sunglasses and suddenly that person is reduced to a storm trooper…zero individuality. We have found tattoos and beards go a long way, thank you hipsters! The lighting and processing plays a huge role in the overall direction. When I first started I really did a 180 and completely got away from the high key, edge lit, over sharpened look and went really low fi in an attempt to feel more real. I think the result was a little underwhelming, and though it felt real/raw, it lacked an energy and excitement. I realized there still needs to be enough punch, just the right amount of polish and authentic environments make all the difference. That is the direction we strive for now. VSCO alone can’t solve all of our problems.
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.45.23 AM
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.45.38 AM
How do you approach gear differently?
Gear is less about the environment and lends itself to more to studio photography which is quite unlike the rest of the magazine. We try to show gear in a very practical, utilitarian way that best illustrates why we feel the need to showcase it in the first place. Bicycling gear definitely evolves over time, but month to month, year to year, the changes appear very minimal. We are often shooting the same things over and over so I try to focus first on how can we best show what is being written about rather than thinking style and lighting first. We work closely with the editors to get a feel for what matters most. Then we go full blown “bike porn” and shoot whatever we think looks the coolest and try to get as close as we can to it. Most often that is what ends up in print, but we still listen to the editors. Also, we take full advantage of provided photography from the companies when available. I figure they have spent a lot more money than we could ever afford on these products. Bonus: they often even come with clipping paths! We have a small but scrappy art department that can comp a lot of provided shots together, add shadows and make it feel like a highly produced editorial page. This allows us to produce and afford our larger shoots.
Gear covers have an entirely different approach to the rest of the magazine. Full disclosure, I cannot get enough ring light for a bicycle cover. I feel embarrassed when I ask photographers to dust off their ring lights, but I honestly think they were made to shoot bikes in studio. Plus there are so many bikes in the advertisements and I have yet to see one shot that way, so it’s really a distinctively editorial look.
What’s the hardest part of doing a single subject title?
BICYCLING requires a direction that clearly separates editorial from advertising. We show people riding bikes and gear. The advertisements are of people riding bikes and gear. Luckily editorial trends and advertising trends usually tend to be the opposite. Cycling advertising is starting to look less produced though so I may have to rethink everything.
Regardless of the direction though, a bicycle can only fit on a 8.5” x 11” page or 17” x 11” spread so many ways. It’s extremely tough to get creative shooting bikes without sinking into a really bad conceptual idea that, at the end of the day, doesn’t even show off the bike that well. This probably has a lot to do with my ring light fetish.
What is your favorite section to design and favorite to photo direct?
I love designing a good profile feature. At previous magazines I would do around 2 every issue. Here it’s closer to 1 every three issues, so I really appreciate them when they come along. My favorite section to photo direct would be the one that requires that doesn’t require direction. That section is slowly in the making, but my goal is to have photographers shooting what they would want to be shooting anyway. I know that sounds cliche, but I really believe there is a bicycling photo culture growing in way similar to skateboarding or surfing. When you have people shooting what they love, their submissions are far better than what I could assign or direct and truly capture everything we want the magazine to be. I am also fortunate to work with editors that see the value in that and are encouraging an art first approach to our features. Hint: please send me awesome stuff.
How often do you ride? if at all?
I ride frequently now. I never did until this job, but I have drank the kool-aid and now I have closet full of tights.
What are you looking for your portraits and riding shots?
I want portraits that draw the reader in and make them spend time with it without realizing it. Something intimate that goes beyond style, but is more about the connection between the photographer and the subject. That connection gets passed on to the reader. For riding shots I’m looking for something with a more voyeuristic feel. The rider should be a real cyclist, not a model. I want the environment to be as much of a character as the rider. These  shots should inspire me to want to ride by making it look like fun, an adventure, not necessarily a workout.
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.43.55 AM Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.44.10 AM Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.44.26 AM Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.44.38 AM
There’s a nice range to your covers in both gear, scenics and riding, is that a new direction for the title? I remember it always being riders on the cover ( and gear of course )
It is a new direction, one that is closer to what we have been doing inside the magazine. I have never wanted the magazine to exclusively feel like a fitness magazine, but rather an enthusiast magazine where getting fit is a great result of cycling, but not the sole purpose. The overly aggressive solo rider taking up the entire cover gives off a very intense, heavy, serious vibe which isn’t who we are.
What’s the best way for photographers to get in touch with you?
Categories: Business

The Daily Edit – Bicycling Magazine: Jesse Southerland

A Photo Editor's Blog - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 9:14am
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.45.54 AM
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.46.08 AM
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.46.14 AM

Bicycling

Design and Photo Director: Jesse Southerland
Art Director: Colin McSherry
Designer: Jimmy Cavalieri

 
Heidi: I understand you do both the photo direction and the design direction which is becoming more often the norm. What are the benefits and the drawbacks in your eyes?

Jesse: Tighter photo budgets each year are no surprise for editorial photographers, but hopefully they can take some comfort in knowing that their clients are legitimately feeling that pinch as well. Yes, in my case I have absorbed the photo director responsibilities in addition to the design direction.
The benefits have been pretty rewarding actually. Being involved from start to finish allows for better communication without as much getting in lost in translation. There aren’t as many surprises (for the most part) when the edits come in. Overall there are less kill fees which unfortunately don’t even have their own budget lines anymore. We absorb that cost out of the real budget, so it’s crucial things go right the first time. In addition to better communication, I think the process is expedited with fewer people involved. I can get back to a photographer who is on set with direct, immediate feedback. They aren’t stuck waiting as long as they would with the workflow of a traditional art department. Also, when pre shoot problems pop up I can generally get back to them within a few hours as opposed to the next day which was often the case before.
It obviously isn’t all roses. Make no mistake, there wouldn’t be a blog of this name if photo editors’ weren’t crucial to most magazines. I’m stretched extremely thin. I’m used to working ahead, but now it isn’t uncommon to be working on 4-5 issues at once every day. The time needed for photo research is greatly reduced. I love having tried and true photographers, but I miss having the time to dig deeper and find younger photographers with a completely fresh and inspiring outlook on the assignments. I feed off of their excitement and hunger. The time spent designing is the time most sacrificed. I can always pull an all nighter to lay out a feature, but I can’t stay up all night and magically produce all of the photos. So the time spent photo directing is more important for me to focus on in most cases.
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.44.54 AM
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.44.58 AM
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.45.04 AM
I see you have some international coverage, how are you sourcing those photographers in such remote places?
For Dario Pegoretti story, we needed him shot in his small studio in the middle of nowhere in Italy for that issue. This stuff is probably another day in the life of a regular photo editor, but it obviously takes more research and logistical communication than the average shoot. I basically scoured through Wired Italia for the coolest portraits and found Max&Douglas who lived somewhat close. They absolutely fell in love with Dario and produced some great photographs. Again, nothing crazy for a photo editor, but a huge victory in my position with such limited resources.
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.46.33 AM
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.46.56 AM
What’s your approach to the overall photo direction of the magazine?
The photo direction is identical to the design direction which is identical to the editorial direction. Everything at BICYCLING is about being exciting, fun, fit, authentic and real. Ideally the photography will contain most of those attributes, but as long as the photo nails at least one of those descriptions we are good, but it has to really nail it. I am most intrigued by authentic and real. Bicycling photography can go really wrong really quick. You may have a really authentic looking person to shoot, but then they put on their outfit, then a helmet, then sunglasses and suddenly that person is reduced to a storm trooper…zero individuality. We have found tattoos and beards go a long way, thank you hipsters! The lighting and processing plays a huge role in the overall direction. When I first started I really did a 180 and completely got away from the high key, edge lit, over sharpened look and went really low fi in an attempt to feel more real. I think the result was a little underwhelming, and though it felt real/raw, it lacked an energy and excitement. I realized there still needs to be enough punch, just the right amount of polish and authentic environments make all the difference. That is the direction we strive for now. VSCO alone can’t solve all of our problems :)
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.45.23 AM
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.45.38 AM
How do you approach gear differently?
Gear is less about the environment and lends itself to more to studio photography which is quite unlike the rest of the magazine. We try to show gear in a very practical, utilitarian way that best illustrates why we feel the need to showcase it in the first place. Bicycling gear definitely evolves over time, but month to month, year to year, the changes appear very minimal. We are often shooting the same things over and over so I try to focus first on how can we best show what is being written about rather than thinking style and lighting first. We work closely with the editors to get a feel for what matters most. Then we go full blown “bike porn” and shoot whatever we think looks the coolest and try to get as close as we can to it. Most often that is what ends up in print, but we still listen to the editors. Also, we take full advantage of provided photography from the companies when available. I figure they have spent a lot more money than we could ever afford on these products. Bonus: they often even come with clipping paths! We have a small but scrappy art department that can comp a lot of provided shots together, add shadows and make it feel like a highly produced editorial page. This allows us to produce and afford our larger shoots.
Gear covers have an entirely different approach to the rest of the magazine. Full disclosure, I cannot get enough ring light for a bicycle cover. I feel embarrassed when I ask photographers to dust off their ring lights, but I honestly think they were made to shoot bikes in studio. Plus there are so many bikes in the advertisements and I have yet to see one shot that way, so it’s really a distinctively editorial look.
What’s the hardest part of doing a single subject title?
BICYCLING requires a direction that clearly separates editorial from advertising. We show people riding bikes and gear. The advertisements are of people riding bikes and gear. Luckily editorial trends and advertising trends usually tend to be the opposite. Cycling advertising is starting to look less produced though so I may have to rethink everything.
Regardless of the direction though, a bicycle can only fit on a 8.5” x 11” page or 17” x 11” spread so many ways. It’s extremely tough to get creative shooting bikes without sinking into a really bad conceptual idea that, at the end of the day, doesn’t even show off the bike that well. This probably has a lot to do with my ring light fetish.
What is your favorite section to design and favorite to photo direct?
I love designing a good profile feature. At previous magazines I would do around 2 every issue. Here it’s closer to 1 every three issues, so I really appreciate them when they come along. My favorite section to photo direct would be the one that requires that doesn’t require direction. That section is slowly in the making, but my goal is to have photographers shooting what they would want to be shooting anyway. I know that sounds cliche, but I really believe there is a bicycling photo culture growing in way similar to skateboarding or surfing. When you have people shooting what they love, their submissions are far better than what I could assign or direct and truly capture everything we want the magazine to be. I am also fortunate to work with editors that see the value in that and are encouraging an art first approach to our features. Hint: please send me awesome stuff.
How often do you ride? if at all?
I ride frequently now. I never did until this job, but I have drank the cool aid and now I have closet full of tights.
What are you looking for your portraits and riding shots?
I want portraits that draw the reader in and make them spend time with it without realizing it. Something intimate that goes beyond style, but is more about the connection between the photographer and the subject. That connection gets passed on to the reader. For riding shots I’m looking for something with a more voyeuristic feel. The rider should be a real cyclist, not a model. I want the environment to be as much of a character as the rider. These  shots should inspire me to want to ride by making it look like fun, an adventure, not necessarily a workout.
Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.43.55 AM Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.44.10 AM Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.44.26 AM Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 9.44.38 AM
There’s a nice range to your covers in both gear, scenics and riding, is that a new direction for the title? I remember it always being riders on the cover ( and gear of course )
It is a new direction, one that is closer to what we have been doing inside the magazine. I have never wanted the magazine to exclusively feel like a fitness magazine, but rather an enthusiast magazine where getting fit is a great result of cycling, but not the sole purpose. The overly aggressive solo rider taking up the entire cover gives off a very intense, heavy, serious vibe which isn’t who we are.
What’s the best way for photographers to get in touch with you?
Categories: Business

Social Media For The Impatient

ASMP's Strictly Business - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 12:02am

[by Rosh Sillars]

Social media offers business owners many paths to success. Photographers use social media for research, developing relationships, establishing expertise and customer service. Some people don’t have the patience for long-term business development that’s required with most social media strategies.

If you can’t wait for them to come to you, go to them. Select ten companies you want to see your work. Next, define the roles of the people you need to know at these companies. Head over to LinkedIn and input the name of the company you want as a client. For example, Tesla Motors. Then review the list for the person with the title you need to know, such as marketing director.

LinkedIn will share if you know someone in common. If there is no connection, take note of other people within the company that you may know or have a common connection. A referral from this person may be all you need.

The next steps may seem a little creepy, but they are necessary to develop quicker relationships. Google your prospect and find out as much as you can about them. Research other social media and groups they participate in and follow them. I would recommend holding off on Facebook until you establish trust. Twitter or Instagram are good secondary social media to follow people you don’t know well.

I like to support prospects by sharing their content. Like any relationship, you need to gauge when it is appropriate to ask questions about showing your work. Some people are easy to connect with and others need time. Keep a least five prospects on your radar. When one turns into a new client or dead-end, add a new one to your focus list.

I would recommend you don’t fully abandon prospects who seem like immediate poor connections. You don’t want to develop a bad reputation. Give them breathing room and keep in touch.

Rosh Sillars is a photographer and marketing consultant based in Detroit Michigan. 

Editor’s note: Join us this this Wednesday, February 18th from 1:00 – 2:00 pm eastern, when Rosh will be presenting ASMP’s Business as unUsual webinar, What’s Working in Social Media Today.  Then visit ASMP’s Facebook page for an extended Q&A session immediately following the webinar

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

Social Media Today

ASMP's Strictly Business - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 12:01am

No longer new uncharted territory, Social Media has matured into a sophisticated – and crowded – marketing space.  This week our contributors take a nod from Wednesday’s Business as unUsual webinar and share their insights into What’s Working in Social Media Today.

 

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

Get What’s Working Today!

ASMP's Strictly Business - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 12:01am

From Social Media to Business Plans, Growing Your Audience to Estimating with Confidence, ASMP offers you critical information on what’s working for photographers today.  Join us at these online and in-person events!

This week:

BaU_logo4blog

What’s Working in Social Media Today
with Social Media guru, Rosh Sillars
Wednesday, February 18, 2015
1:00 – 2:00 pm EDT / 10:00 – 11:00 am PDT

Social Media can help you build an engaged audience of dedicated clients and evangelists or it can be an enormous time suck that takes you nowhere. Join us for a conversation with Rosh Sillars, who literally wrote the book on social media for photographers. Rosh will talk about what’s changed, what’s the same and how to make social media work for you.

This informative webinar is free for all live attendees.

Join us Wednesday, February 18 — REGISTER TODAY!

• • •

This Month:

300x250_Register

Wedding & Portrait Photography International
Annual Conference
February 26 – March 5, 2015
Las Vegas, NV

 

The premier industry event for wedding and portrait photographers, WPPI 2015 will be held in Las Vegas, February 26 – March 5.  Don’t miss Your Roadmap to Success with Judy Herrmann on March 4 from 3:00 – 4:30 pm:

Most of us become professional photographers because we want to earn a living doing work we love.  Achieving that dream, though, takes more than basic business skills.  In this energizing and informative seminar, Judy Herrmann, provides real world strategies for building a working business plan that will help you build the business of your dreams.  Unlike formal business plans that are designed to satisfy lenders, your working plan will help you set and achieve your creative and financial goals, identify and assess business opportunities, compete more successfully and attract the right clients for your business. Whether you’re just starting out or have years of experience, the tools and techniques shared in this program will help you earn more money doing work your love.

Learn more and register at www.wppionline.com.

• • •

Next Month:

SPE_Logo

Society for Photographic Education
Annual Conference
March 12 – 15, 2015
New Orleans, LA

 

Register by February 20th to save on the Society for Photographic Education’s annual conference, Atmospheres: Climate, Equity and Community in Photography, in New Orleans, from March 12 – 15.  Don’t miss ASMP’s industry seminars on March 12, featuring Vision + U = Success with Jennifer Kilberg and Amanda Sosa Stone, Growing Your Audience: the Secret Sauce is You with Andrew Fingerman, Estimating with Confidence with Lynn Kyle and Launch Your Career with Judy Herrmann. Learn more and register at www.spenational.com.

• • •

April:

NAB_P-PW_LogoASMP Members Save $100
on NAB & Post|Production World

National Association of Broadcasters
Annual Conference & Expo
April 11 – 16, 2015
Las Vegas, NV

The National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) annual expo brings nearly 98,000 media and entertainment professionals together for over 500 skill-building sessions and a tradeshow featuring nearly 2,000 exhibitors.  ASMP members save $100 off a Smart Pass, which gives you access to nearly everything NAB has to offer or registration for the Post | Production World Conference at NAB, featuring educational programs specifically for creators.  Learn more about NAB at www.nabshow.com or about P|PW at www.nabshow.com/attend/post-production-worldASMP members, click here to get your $100 discount.

and

2015_PSPF_LogoASMP Members Save 10% – the Best Discount Available!

Palm Springs Photo Festival
April 26 – May 1, 2015

Palm Springs, CA

Spend three exhilarating days with Mark Seliger, Dan Winters, Frank Ockenfels III, Jock Sturges, Ron Haviv and other celebrated master photographers.  Present your portfolio to some of the most sought-after ad agencies, magazines, galleries and more.  It all happens at the Palm Springs Photo Festival.  Learn more at http://2015.palmspringsphotofestival.com.
ASMP Members click here to get your 10% savings.

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

ImageBrief: A scourge on the photographic industry

Photo Business Forum - Fri, 02/13/2015 - 4:07pm
In May of 2011, self-proclaimed "…world's first crowd-sourced image library…" launched. Since then, their speculation-based model of soliciting work has eroded the value of assignment-based photography and diminished the overall value of photography in the process.

In 2007, Photo Business News published this article "nOnRequest - This is Not Your Father's 'Agency'" where we outlined the failing idea of a "custom stock" business model. PBN wasn't alone in this perspective. Photo District News, in an article titled "Revolutions that never happened" took a similarly dim view of the model, writing "Sometimes bad ideas take care of themselves. OnRequest Images never backed down from custom stock, but the idea was hard to explain and held little appeal to art buyers...Another custom stock service, iStockPhoto.com's BuyRequest, also failed to capture much interest and was quietly discontinued last year." A few weeks later, on stage at the Microsoft Pro Photographers Summit held on the Microsoft campus in Redmond Washington, we posed the question about the problems with OnRequest and their "custom stock" model. The head of OnRequest, David Norris, said "that model was interesting, but didn't pan out." We wrote about this in a follow-up piece titled "OnRequest - Realizing the Obvious". I remain convinced that these people are following through on my anti-maxim "don't let common sense get in the way of a good idea."

ImageBrief published quotes from their clients that appeared on the website around their launch such as "We've used ImageBrief for our ad campaigns and have had great results every time" but when we followed up with this user, he responded to our inquiry saying he'd used the website twice by that time and that "it was just much easier for us to pick from a tailored selection of images from pro-photographers than have to go through stock libraries like Getty who I found to be very expensive." Another user was quoted on their website as saying "No more searching random library images." When we followed up with them, they noted "...yes I still use the 'image libraries', just depends what I'm doing."

(Continued after the Jump)
Sources in the industry have suggested that the CEO of ImageBrief, Simon Moss, cares about photographers and sustaining their craft, and that he is opposed to micro stock, and that he wants fair paying deals for photographers. Here's an example of a problem with this:

A photograph is needed that does not exist. According to one of the quoted users we contacted, "if I do a search in Corbis for "businesswoman presenting" I get over 2000 search results." He then said "If I need an image of a 'businesswomen presenting in a white suit" I get zero search results. The benefit of ImageBrief to me is that I can ask for exactly what I want". Ok, so we're not talking about a stock image marketplace of already existing images, we're talking about the appeal of ImageBrief being custom stock shot on spec by more than one photographer with maybe only one getting paid. Setting aside the earlier points by OnRequest and BuyRequest that this model does not work, consider this: A license for an image like this could garner, let's say, $400 for a simple use. That's probably a fair licensing fee in a number of arenas. Oh, and if that's the fee via Getty, the photographer will take home about $100 (making it decidedly less reasonable). Now, let's say the businesswoman presenting in a white suit is the shoot. Someone has to produce the shoot, putting in time, getting the wardrobe, model, and doing the post production on the image. Let's say four photographers then decide to produce the job on spec, in response to the "buyer brief." ImageBrief's client then cherry picks the work of one photographer. The selected photographer gets 70% of $400, or $280 and receives exactly $0 towards reimbursing production expenses, and the other three photographers get no fee and no reimbursed expenses. Consider the law of averages - if 4 photographers repetitively produce and bid on 20 shoots, they will only get selected 5 times. In this example, that would mean there's 75% of available overhead, again, using the law of averages. I don't think there's anyone in the industry that will tell you there's even 50% overhead in the business. The numbers get worse once you realize that the prospective buyer can also choose to not use any of the images that were produced, or if more than one photographer "bids" on the project. According to an ImageBrief FAQ, when asked "Do image buyers ever commission photographers for shoots", responded "not yet - but it's coming." I would ask - When? It's been four years. Supposedly, according to this Huffington Post article where Moss was interviewed, he states "we recently began enabling buyers to hire photographers directly through ImageBrief. When a photographer books a job through ImageBrief, they keep 100% of the fee. " But ask yourself, why would they commission a shoot when they can get multiple shoots commissioned for free with no obligation to actually buy/license a photo! In a comment in response to criticisms that were made about this model, CEO Simon Moss wrote "One of the absolute key things I must stress is that we have definitely NOT built an ‘on-spec’ commissioning platform." Moss wrote this in a comment on the APhotoEditor blog article "ImageBrief – Crowdsourcing Image Requests" back in June of 2011 shortly after their launch. Moss also seems to misunderstand what "spec" work is, when in a later comment he writes "Crowdsourcing photography is very different to graphic design though. Graphic design is almost always spec work… ie a business needs a custom logo developed and designers must create very specific work for the buyer." Graphic design is almost always NOT "spec" work, because "spec" is short for "speculative" or on "speculation", and NOT "specific". One can only hope that since 2011 his understanding of this has been corrected.

Yet, perhaps Moss and the rest of the ImageBrief folks need to review their official marketing materials. Deborah Kolb, in the Los Angeles area, is promoted by ImageBrief as "one of the most successful photographer on ImageBrief", in a video here that was posted in January 2015, where she states in the video "sometimes I'll look at a brief and I'll say to myself 'Wow, I might as well just shoot that instead of going through my computer and finding something that might match'" then they feature her shooting on spec for a brief. Later in the video she states she's been on ImageBrief for about a year, and has "won 14 briefs." The question is - how many has she shot? She states that the total gross for all the shoots shes "won" is close to $20,000 in sales, and states she would receive $14,000 in gross income, for ads that include clients like a billboard for a Las Vegas hotel and a Costco cover. She also states, as the "most successful photographer on ImageBrief", that there's something different "about shooting for ImageBrief." So, it's unclear how Moss can state they are not promoting spec photography and then put out videos where they are holding up those that do as the most successful on ImageBrief.

On the ImageBrief blog here, they are now promoting more royalty-free buyer briefs because they are "responding to client demands and listening to the market." They characterize RF as "RF is a perpetual license, with unlimited usage, worldwide." Back in 2011 American Photographic Artists (then Advertising Photographers of America) issued an APA Alert warning photographers of ImageBrief as "a service that we recommend you avoid." APA stated "We feel that this type of business scenario where photographers shoot on "spec" in hopes of having their work used will only further erode the hiring/licensing model that APA supports." Some things never change. APA was right then, and the warning rings true still.
digg_url = 'WEBSITE_URL'; digg_bgcolor = '#161d23';digg_skin = 'compact';
Please post your comments by clicking the link below. If you've got questions, please pose them in our Photo Business Forum Flickr Group Discussion Threads.
Categories: Business

This Week In Photography Books: Sugimoto/Misrach

A Photo Editor's Blog - Fri, 02/13/2015 - 10:08am

by Jonathan Blaustein

I’ve been watching a lot of John Wayne movies lately. I was always a Clint Eastwood guy, so I’d never really understood the Duke, until recently. It’s stupefying to discover the way one man stood as a symbol for an entire nation.

John Wayne captures the rough, charismatic, violent and patriarchal vibe that permeated the US in the post-WWII years. If his middle name were actually Manifest Destiny, would anyone really be surprised?

He led with his big, hamhock fists, and we all needed to trust that he knew what he was doing. He was John Wayne, after all, a facade built upon poor Marion Morrison, just as our fair country was crafted upon the bones of a conquered race.

I even read a quote in which Mr. Wayne said he had no problem with the fact that America stole all this land, because the Native Americans weren’t using it properly. For real. I read that. (Though in our suspicious Internet age, I guess that doesn’t mean he said it.)

I was discussing my newfound fascination with a friend of mine just after Christmas. Iván was my professor in graduate school, and he studied film at NYU. He agreed that John Wayne represented America during it’s reign as the big-swinging-dick-World-Power, but suggested he had been supplanted by another fictional hero for the post-Vietnam era: Forrest Gump.

We had a good giggle at first, because it’s hard to even believe how much everyone cared about Forrest back in the nineties. (Run, Forrest, Run.) But afterwards, he said he was dead serious. Forrest was a bumbling, compromised, win-by-the-skin-of-your-teeth, trust-in-the-luck-of-the-Universe kind of guy. Nobody thought he was a real superhero, but he managed to turn out OK.

These days, Forrest Gump seems quaint to the point of irrelevance. We like our heroes ironic and snarky, like Robert Downey Jr, beefy and dim, like Channing Tatum, or not-even-American, like Chris Hemsworth and Michael Fassbender. And as for Forrest, he’s been relegated to the cultural dustbin.

He did leave us with a few words to live by though, didn’t he? “Life is like a box of chocolates: you never know what you’re going to get.”

How can you argue with Forrest on that one? You can’t. Especially when, like me, you’ve just opened up a plastic sleeve to find “Assignment No. 2: Sugimoto/Misrach: San Quentin Prison,” published by TBW books in Oakland.

My first thought was very 21st C: WTF?

You find what looks like an institutional file folder, replete with a water stain up top, and a red ink smudge closer to the bottom. It sits there, that red ink stain, judging me. The more I look at it, the more it resembles a tornado.

Open it up, and the left side has a succession of names, including those two aforementioned art stars. Then, on the right, we see a statement claiming that an essay, to follow, was written by a prisoner in San Quentin named Michael Nelson. Whatever we’re to read was apparently written while he was in solitary confinement.

They had my attention all along, but now my eyebrows have stood at attention like a Guantanamo prison guard. What are we about to see, I wonder. And will it be filled with facts about the tragic, embarrassing incarceration rate in this country? It is to be an essay that makes us question how such a dilemma came to pass?

No. Not at all.

Flip out again, and you’re staring a sheet of lined, yellow paper, with text handwritten in blue ink. Or so it seems. I’ve seen enough photobooks to know that it’s a high grade reproduction, but still, it’s interesting.

The flap on the righthand side states that all the proceeds of this publication will go to support the prison education programs that spawned this project. Things begin to fall into place.

The first page of the essay is a letter, in which Mr. Nelson apologizes for missing class, as he cannot attend in his current circumstance. He wonders if he’ll be able to achieve full credit, while locked up by himself in what must be some form of hell.

Again, can I get a WTF?

Open the last two flaps, and we see a reproduction of a famous Sugimoto picture from his movie theater series, and a photo of a drive-in movie theater screen from Misrach’s seminal “Desert Cantos” work. We’re looking at two examples of seminal work from the 20th Century.

Flip up the first page of the yellow-paper-stack, and we find a thoughtful, well-written essay that compares and contrasts the two images. It’s a copy of an actual prison class assignment from 2011.

Wow.

I’ve seen a lot of things in my day, and a lot of books in the 3.5 years that I’ve been writing this column. But I’ve never seen anything like this.

The essay is smart, but takes a turn towards poignant when Mr. Nelson alludes to his own situation in life. The metaphor of a world changing beyond recognition, seen in the pictures, also seems well-chosen, for someone living on the inside.

At the end, we get a page that explains a bit more about Mr. Nelson’s background. Jailed for murder at 15, 17 years into a 25 year sentence. Like many a good Bay Area liberal, he’s found himself working within the system to help others.

His info is followed by straight bios for Mr. Misrach, Mr. Sugimoto, and Mr. Dertinger and Ms. Poor, who both teach at CSU Sacramento, and work with prisoners as well. It was a rare mis-step, I thought, the conventional bio page in a production this original. Good information to have, of course, and smartly placed, when your curiosity is at its peak…but then, we all have bios. (One more piece of PR that makes us feel like we’re products to be bought and sold, in lieu of our prints and services.)

Regardless, I hate to quibble, as this is a very inspiring piece of work. Definitely one to buy, as your money will serve others, and this feels like something rare that people will look back on, down the line.

Bottom Line: Incredibly innovative production

To Purchase “Assignment No. 2: Sugimoto/Misrach: San Quentin Prison” Visit Photo-Eye

IMG_0258

IMG_0259

IMG_0260

IMG_0261

IMG_0262

IMG_0263

IMG_0264

IMG_0265

IMG_0266

IMG_0267

IMG_0268

Books are provided by Photo-Eye in exchange for links back for purchase.

Books are found in the bookstore and submissions are not accepted.

Categories: Business

This Week In Photography Books: Sugimoto/Misrach

A Photo Editor's Blog - Fri, 02/13/2015 - 10:08am

by Jonathan Blaustein

I’ve been watching a lot of John Wayne movies lately. I was always a Clint Eastwood guy, so I’d never really understood the Duke, until recently. It’s stupefying to discover the way one man stood as a symbol for an entire nation.

John Wayne captures the rough, charismatic, violent and patriarchal vibe that permeated the US in the post-WWII years. If his middle name were actually Manifest Destiny, would anyone really be surprised?

He led with his big, hamhock fists, and we all needed to trust that he knew what he was doing. He was John Wayne, after all, a facade built upon poor Marion Morrison, just as our fair country was crafted upon the bones of a conquered race.

I even read a quote in which Mr. Wayne said he had no problem with the fact that America stole all this land, because the Native Americans weren’t using it properly. For real. I read that. (Though in our suspicious Internet age, I guess that doesn’t mean he said it.)

I was discussing my newfound fascination with a friend of mine just after Christmas. Iván was my professor in graduate school, and he studied film at NYU. He agreed that John Wayne represented America during it’s reign as the big-swinging-dick-World-Power, but suggested he had been supplanted by another fictional hero for the post-Vietnam era: Forest Gump.

We had a good giggle at first, because it’s hard to even believe how much everyone cared about Forest back in the nineties. (Run, Forest, Run.) But afterwards, he said he was dead serious. Forest was a bumbling, compromised, win-by-the-skin-of-your-teeth, trust-in-the-luck-of-the-Universe kind of guy. Nobody thought he was a real superhero, but he managed to turn out OK.

These days, Forest Gump seems quaint to the point of irrelevance. We like our heroes ironic and snarky, like Robert Downey Jr, beefy and dim, like Channing Tatum, or not-even-American, like Chris Hemsworth and Michael Fassbender. And as for Forest, he’s been relegated to the cultural dustbin.

He did leave us with a few words to live by though, didn’t he? “Life is like a box of chocolates: you never know what you’re going to get.”

How can you argue with Forest on that one? You can’t. Especially when, like me, you’ve just opened up a plastic sleeve to find “Assignment No. 2: Sugimoto/Misrach: San Quentin Prison,” published by TBW books in Oakland.

My first thought was very 21st C: WTF?

You find what looks like an institutional file folder, replete with a water stain up top, and a red ink smudge closer to the bottom. It sits there, that red ink stain, judging me. The more I look at it, the more it resembles a tornado.

Open it up, and the left side has a succession of names, including those two aforementioned art stars. Then, on the right, we see a statement claiming that an essay, to follow, was written by a prisoner in San Quentin named Michael Nelson. Whatever we’re to read was apparently written while he was in solitary confinement.

They had my attention all along, but now my eyebrows have stood at attention like a Guantanamo prison guard. What are we about to see, I wonder. And will it be filled with facts about the tragic, embarrassing incarceration rate in this country? It is to be an essay that makes us question how such a dilemma came to pass?

No. Not at all.

Flip out again, and you’re staring a sheet of lined, yellow paper, with text handwritten in blue ink. Or so it seems. I’ve seen enough photobooks to know that it’s a high grade reproduction, but still, it’s interesting.

The flap on the righthand side states that all the proceeds of this publication will go to support the prison education programs that spawned this project. Things begin to fall into place.

The first page of the essay is a letter, in which Mr. Nelson apologizes for missing class, as he cannot attend in his current circumstance. He wonders if he’ll be able to achieve full credit, while locked up by himself in what must be some form of hell.

Again, can I get a WTF?

Open the last two flaps, and we see a reproduction of a famous Sugimoto picture from his movie theater series, and a photo of a drive-in movie theater screen from Misrach’s seminal “Desert Cantos” work. We’re looking at two examples of seminal work from the 20th Century.

Flip up the first page of the yellow-paper-stack, and we find a thoughtful, well-written essay that compares and contrasts the two images. It’s a copy of an actual prison class assignment from 2011.

Wow.

I’ve seen a lot of things in my day, and a lot of books in the 3.5 years that I’ve been writing this column. But I’ve never seen anything like this.

The essay is smart, but takes a turn towards poignant when Mr. Nelson alludes to his own situation in life. The metaphor of a world changing beyond recognition, seen in the pictures, also seems well-chosen, for someone living on the inside.

At the end, we get a page that explains a bit more about Mr. Nelson’s background. Jailed for murder at 15, 17 years into a 25 year sentence. Like many a good Bay Area liberal, he’s found himself working within the system to help others.

His info is followed by straight bios for Mr. Misrach, Mr. Sugimoto, and Mr. Dertinger and Ms. Poor, who both teach at CSU Sacramento, and work with prisoners as well. It was a rare mis-step, I thought, the conventional bio page in a production this original. Good information to have, of course, and smartly placed, when your curiosity is at its peak…but then, we all have bios. (One more piece of PR that makes us feel like we’re products to be bought and sold, in lieu of our prints and services.)

Regardless, I hate to quibble, as this is a very inspiring piece of work. Definitely one to buy, as your money will serve others, and this feels like something rare that people will look back on, down the line.

Bottom Line: Incredibly innovative production

To Purchase “Assignment No. 2: Sugimoto/Misrach: San Quentin Prison” Visit Photo-Eye

IMG_0258

IMG_0259

IMG_0260

IMG_0261

IMG_0262

IMG_0263

IMG_0264

IMG_0265

IMG_0266

IMG_0267

IMG_0268

Books are provided by Photo-Eye in exchange for links back for purchase.

Books are found in the bookstore and submissions are not accepted.

Categories: Business

“I Am Big. It’s the Pictures That Got Small. “

ASMP's Strictly Business - Fri, 02/13/2015 - 12:01am

[by Thomas Werner]

My “Ah-ha” moment came when I realized that though many of our business models are changing, the underlying structure of our industry has not. We have always been in the business of supply and demand, selling imagery to distributors to attract and/or satisfy a specific audience. Whether it is a magazine, advertisement, blog, or annual report, we are asked to deliver images that are appropriate to the client, and more important the people that engage with their media. Of course, beyond this photography and motion can inform, influence, inspire, entertain, and educate, but the type and quality of the imagery used is directly related to its ability to build and sustain market share within a desired demographic.

This point was brought home when viewing the crowd sourced photographs on the front page of the New York Times newspaper on January 28, 2015. Each of the 9 photos used were sourced from Instagram via the hash tag #NYTsnow, which sent the images to the Times site. The newspaper then chose their favorites and ran them in print as well as online, perhaps assuming the image makers would be happy with the publicity as opposed to the pay. I call this the “American Idolization” of our business; the idea that everyone wants to be famous, and a little exposure and validation along with a chance to get their big break is enough for most.

The photographs used by the Times were quite good, and certainly, “good enough” for their readers. Supply met demand for a price, (a little publicity) which the image makers seemed to have found appropriate. Yet beyond saving a little money the Times use of Instagram served a number of purposes as well. By utilizing Instagram to ask for photographs of the blizzard the newspaper engaged a number of image makers with their brand as they consciously created imagery for the Times site. Asking photographers to attach #NYTsnow to every image submitted gave the newspaper free publicity across Instagram, Facebook and other forms of social media, garnering an audience they could not have otherwise reached. Finally, utilizing Instagram helped the newspaper connect with a younger demographic, thereby building market share and expanding their reach in the online marketplace. Each of these were value added results derived from a simple request, and magnified by the photographs front page use.

The photographers who have read this story and bemoaned the loss of “great photographs” in the media need to remember that we have access to thousands of great images through multiple points of distribution. Great imagery is not always the key, supply, demand, and audience is. Conversations like this remind me of the scene from the movie Sunset Boulevard when screen writer Joe Gillis is talking to former silent movie star Norma Desmond regarding the changes that talking films and television have brought to the film industry.

Joe Gillis: “You’re Norma Desmond. You used to be in silent pictures. You used to be big. “

Norma Desmond: “I am big. It’s the pictures that got small. “

We need to learn from the ways companies like the Times utilize traditional, social and new media to reach new audiences and monetize new demographics. Valuation has always been linked to the size and demographic of the viewing audience, based on the method of distribution. This is the underlying structure of many traditional licensing agreements. The difference is that we may now be asked to bring our own audience to the table or become our own channel of distribution. An image maker’s audience represents value to many clients, and it is a new resource that we can use to monetize our imagery, or present billable value to a client like the New York Times when they would like to utilize our content. Understanding and applying this concept will be the key to many image makers success in the future.

Norma Desmond: [to newsreel camera] And I promise you I’ll never desert you again because after ‘Salome’ we’ll make another picture and another picture. You see, this is my life! It always will be! Nothing else! Just us, the cameras, and those wonderful people out there in the dark!… All right, Mr. DeMille, I’m ready for my close-up….

Thomas Werner; Educator, Curator, Consultant

Twitter.com/TWPROJECTS | Linkedin.com/in/twprojectsFacebook.com/ThomasWernerProjects

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

The Art of the Personal Project: Jeremiah Stanley

A Photo Editor's Blog - Thu, 02/12/2015 - 10:23am

As a former Art Producer, I have always been drawn to personal projects because they are the sole vision of the photographer and not an extension of an art director, photo editor, or graphic designer. This new column, “The Art of the Personal Project” will feature the personal projects of photographers using the Yodelist marketing database. You can read their blog at http://yodelist.wordpress.com. Projects are discovered online and submissions are not accepted.

Today’s featured photographer is: Jeremiah Stanley

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0001

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0002

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0004

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0006

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0008

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0009

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0010

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0013

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0014

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0015

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0023

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0025

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0026

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0027

Full disclosure, Jeremiah is a current client of mine.

How long have you been shooting?
I guess I’m kind of a late bloomer as they say. I didn’t buy my first digital camera until I was 28 (I’m 34 now) and recently accepted into the photojournalism program at the University of Florida.

It wasn’t until I got into Eddie Adams Workshop XXV in 2012 (team Lilac forever!) that I decided to give photography all I’ve got. There I had the opportunity to shake hands with and get portfolio reviews from amazing portrait photographers like Gregory Heisler (I think I actually ruined his breakfast) and Dan Winters. After meeting them and hearing them speak, I was changed forever as a person and photographer.

So, to answer your question, I’ve been shooting commercially for about 3 years.

Are you self-taught or photography school taught?
I graduated from the photojournalism program at the University of Florida and I absolutely loved my time there. It wasn’t so much the technical skills and training that I benefited from the most, but it was the people I had the chance to meet while in school.

For instance, Sports Illustrated photographer Bill Frakes was my Advanced-2 photography professor. I mean how crazy is that right?! Also, I met the great portrait photographer Andrew Hetherington while he was there on assignment for Fortune magazine, which was a major turning point for me. Both of these men continue to be great mentors to me to this day.

Having a photojournalism background has also been a huge advantage in my portrait work. Photojournalsim is all about catching that moment and telling a story and portraiture is a lot of the same. You’re looking for that special something, that one moment that will tell the story of that person or tell a story through that person. I think going through photojournalism school has been a huge advantage for what I do now, even though it wouldn’t be considered true photojournalism.

With this particular project, what was your inspiration to shoot it?
People. It’s always about people. I love people.

Everyone is so unique and everyone has a story to tell and most people, when given the chance, really want to tell their story. It’s something that just fascinates me. And as a portrait photographer, I get to explore different worlds and dive into people’s lives on a daily basis and I absolutely love that.

I’ve always had the ability to approach people from all different types of economic and social backgrounds and having that ability really helped out with this project. Being approachable and respectful really goes a long way. All of the bikers we photographed were very nice and courteous, but if you can’t relate, on some level at least, to the person you’re photographing, then your portraits will be nothing – they’ll be flat and lack substance.

How many years have you been shooting this project before you decided to present it?
I actually photographed this project in one day and I presented it on the web shortly after.

How long do you spend on a personal project before deciding if it is working?
Usually after the first few shoots and when I get them on a screen I can tell if there’s enough beef there to actually have something worth looking at. My wife, Meredith, is a really great editor and she provides me with a generous amount of honest insight into how the project is taking shape from an outside perspective. For this project, I knew after the first woman I photographed that this was going to be something good. I never know how good, but I had a feeling people would be interested in looking at these portraits.

Since shooting for your portfolio is different from personal work, how do you feel when the work is different?
This one is always an interesting question to me or maybe it’s just because I’m still early in my career.

For me, it’s all personal and it may be cliche to say, but for me there’s literally no distinction from shooting for my portfolio and shooting personal work. My approach is one and the same. Every time I’m working toward making an image, whether in pre-production, while shooting, or post-production, I’m using all of myself, both physically and mentally. I’m using all my past experiences, good and bad, to interpret the world around me which will affect the images I make. And for me that’s the goal. I want my personal experiences to affect the images and when they do, that’s when I know what I’m making is real and honest and truthful.

It’s when photography turns into an outlet and an extension of myself that I begin making real images, and I think that’s why editors and directors hire me or at least that’s why I hope they do and hope they do in the future. It’s the photographer’s own, personal voice that speaks the loudest and when I’m allowed to explore the world from my vantage point, really great things can happen. The only difference here is that sometimes a company or firm fronts the bill and sometimes I do. But whenever I’m shooting or working toward a shoot, it’s all personal.

Have you ever posted your personal work on social media venues such as Reddit, Tumblr, Instagram or Facebook?
Yes, certainly. Getting your work out there for people to see is half the battle.

Here’s my shameless plug:

www.Facebook.com/JeremiahStanleyPhoto
www.Twitter.com/JeremiahStanley
www.Instagram.com/miahstanphoto

If so, has the work ever gone viral and possibly with great press?
Not yet. Still waiting for my 15 minutes of fame.

Have you printed your personal projects for your marketing to reach potential clients?
I sure have and will be doing the same with this one. I actually love walking into meetings with this project in my book and I enjoy trying to guess before each meeting what type of reaction they’re going to have. Even if an editor or art director are quick flippers, they’ll almost always stop when they get to the ‘Bikers’ project.

Once I was in a meeting with about 8 creative directors and after a few minutes they were all huddled together, standing over the portfolio, pointing, laughing and asking questions. And that’s exactly what you want to happen during a meeting.

ARTIST STATEMENT ABOUT THE PROJECT:

This project was photographed at a biker event in a small Florida town called Leesburg. Every year, about 300,000 people come together here to talk about and look at bikes. I, of course, came to look at the people.

It’s always hard to guess what type of people will come to any particular event as often times the images in my head of the people I think will attend don’t always match the people that actually show up to that event. In this case though, they absolutely exceeded what I had hoped for.

I hired an assistant to hold one light near the rear on a monopod and I held another light off to the front side, also on a monopod, and shot with the other hand (you can actually see the exact set-up in some of the reflections in their sunglasses). We were basically a walking, mobile studio literally carrying all of the gear on our backs and shooting simultaneously on-the-fly.

I decided to leave the background messy, and not worry too much about composition, because I’ve seen tons of similar projects where the photographer pulls them onto some type of seamless backdrop and I wanted this one to be different. I really wanted to bring the viewer into the event, as if they were actually standing right there themselves looking at that particular person, using the environment of the event itself to help.

To make the portrait series have a cohesive look and feel, I used the same focal-length lens (with an ND filter to bring down the background exposure), lighting, and angle, while only changing the physical locations. We were there shooting for about 10 hours and met some incredible people.

—————

Jeremiah Stanley is a commercial and editorial portrait photographer based in Florida and Dallas (It’s currently 81 degrees outside). He enjoys hiking with his 9-year-old daughter and the Texas Two-Step. His portraiture recently won an American Photography 30 award and a PDN World in Focus award. He was also selected to be a part of Eddie Adams Workshop XXV. If he wasn’t a photographer, he would be a competitive barbeque smoker. Please contact him directly to see what his photography can do for you.

APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world. She has been involved in the photography and illustration industry since the mid 80s, after founding the art buying department at The Martin Agency then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies. She has a new Twitter fed with helpful marketing information.  Follow her@SuzanneSease.

Categories: Business

The Art of the Personal Project: Jeremiah Stanley

A Photo Editor's Blog - Thu, 02/12/2015 - 10:23am

As a former Art Producer, I have always been drawn to personal projects because they are the sole vision of the photographer and not an extension of an art director, photo editor, or graphic designer. This new column, “The Art of the Personal Project” will feature the personal projects of photographers using the Yodelist marketing database. You can read their blog at http://yodelist.wordpress.com. Projects are discovered online and submissions are not accepted.

Today’s featured photographer is: Jeremiah Stanley

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0001

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0002

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0004

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0006

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0008

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0009

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0010

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0013

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0014

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0015

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0023

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0025

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0026

JeremiahStanley_Bikers_0027

Full disclosure, Jeremiah is a current client of mine.

How long have you been shooting?
I guess I’m kind of a late bloomer as they say. I didn’t buy my first digital camera until I was 28 (I’m 34 now) and recently accepted into the photojournalism program at the University of Florida.

It wasn’t until I got into Eddie Adams Workshop XXV in 2012 (team Lilac forever!) that I decided to give photography all I’ve got. There I had the opportunity to shake hands with and get portfolio reviews from amazing portrait photographers like Gregory Heisler (I think I actually ruined his breakfast) and Dan Winters. After meeting them and hearing them speak, I was changed forever as a person and photographer.

So, to answer your question, I’ve been shooting commercially for about 3 years.

Are you self-taught or photography school taught?
I graduated from the photojournalism program at the University of Florida and I absolutely loved my time there. It wasn’t so much the technical skills and training that I benefited from the most, but it was the people I had the chance to meet while in school.

For instance, Sports Illustrated photographer Bill Frakes was my Advanced-2 photography professor. I mean how crazy is that right?! Also, I met the great portrait photographer Andrew Hetherington while he was there on assignment for Fortune magazine, which was a major turning point for me. Both of these men continue to be great mentors to me to this day.

Having a photojournalism background has also been a huge advantage in my portrait work. Photojournalsim is all about catching that moment and telling a story and portraiture is a lot of the same. You’re looking for that special something, that one moment that will tell the story of that person or tell a story through that person. I think going through photojournalism school has been a huge advantage for what I do now, even though it wouldn’t be considered true photojournalism.

With this particular project, what was your inspiration to shoot it?
People. It’s always about people. I love people.

Everyone is so unique and everyone has a story to tell and most people, when given the chance, really want to tell their story. It’s something that just fascinates me. And as a portrait photographer, I get to explore different worlds and dive into people’s lives on a daily basis and I absolutely love that.

I’ve always had the ability to approach people from all different types of economic and social backgrounds and having that ability really helped out with this project. Being approachable and respectful really goes a long way. All of the bikers we photographed were very nice and courteous, but if you can’t relate, on some level at least, to the person you’re photographing, then your portraits will be nothing – they’ll be flat and lack substance.

How many years have you been shooting this project before you decided to present it?
I actually photographed this project in one day and I presented it on the web shortly after.

How long do you spend on a personal project before deciding if it is working?
Usually after the first few shoots and when I get them on a screen I can tell if there’s enough beef there to actually have something worth looking at. My wife, Meredith, is a really great editor and she provides me with a generous amount of honest insight into how the project is taking shape from an outside perspective. For this project, I knew after the first woman I photographed that this was going to be something good. I never know how good, but I had a feeling people would be interested in looking at these portraits.

Since shooting for your portfolio is different from personal work, how do you feel when the work is different?
This one is always an interesting question to me or maybe it’s just because I’m still early in my career.

For me, it’s all personal and it may be cliche to say, but for me there’s literally no distinction from shooting for my portfolio and shooting personal work. My approach is one and the same. Every time I’m working toward making an image, whether in pre-production, while shooting, or post-production, I’m using all of myself, both physically and mentally. I’m using all my past experiences, good and bad, to interpret the world around me which will affect the images I make. And for me that’s the goal. I want my personal experiences to affect the images and when they do, that’s when I know what I’m making is real and honest and truthful.

It’s when photography turns into an outlet and an extension of myself that I begin making real images, and I think that’s why editors and directors hire me or at least that’s why I hope they do and hope they do in the future. It’s the photographer’s own, personal voice that speaks the loudest and when I’m allowed to explore the world from my vantage point, really great things can happen. The only difference here is that sometimes a company or firm fronts the bill and sometimes I do. But whenever I’m shooting or working toward a shoot, it’s all personal.

Have you ever posted your personal work on social media venues such as Reddit, Tumblr, Instagram or Facebook?
Yes, certainly. Getting your work out there for people to see is half the battle.

Here’s my shameless plug:

www.Facebook.com/JeremiahStanleyPhoto
www.Twitter.com/JeremiahStanley
www.Instagram.com/miahstanphoto

If so, has the work ever gone viral and possibly with great press?
Not yet. Still waiting for my 15 minutes of fame.

Have you printed your personal projects for your marketing to reach potential clients?
I sure have and will be doing the same with this one. I actually love walking into meetings with this project in my book and I enjoy trying to guess before each meeting what type of reaction they’re going to have. Even if an editor or art director are quick flippers, they’ll almost always stop when they get to the ‘Bikers’ project.

Once I was in a meeting with about 8 creative directors and after a few minutes they were all huddled together, standing over the portfolio, pointing, laughing and asking questions. And that’s exactly what you want to happen during a meeting.

ARTIST STATEMENT ABOUT THE PROJECT:

This project was photographed at a biker event in a small Florida town called Leesburg. Every year, about 300,000 people come together here to talk about and look at bikes. I, of course, came to look at the people.

It’s always hard to guess what type of people will come to any particular event as often times the images in my head of the people I think will attend don’t always match the people that actually show up to that event. In this case though, they absolutely exceeded what I had hoped for.

I hired an assistant to hold one light near the rear on a monopod and I held another light off to the front side, also on a monopod, and shot with the other hand (you can actually see the exact set-up in some of the reflections in their sunglasses). We were basically a walking, mobile studio literally carrying all of the gear on our backs and shooting simultaneously on-the-fly.

I decided to leave the background messy, and not worry too much about composition, because I’ve seen tons of similar projects where the photographer pulls them onto some type of seamless backdrop and I wanted this one to be different. I really wanted to bring the viewer into the event, as if they were actually standing right there themselves looking at that particular person, using the environment of the event itself to help.

To make the portrait series have a cohesive look and feel, I used the same focal-length lens (with an ND filter to bring down the background exposure), lighting, and angle, while only changing the physical locations. We were there shooting for about 10 hours and met some incredible people.

—————

Jeremiah Stanley is a commercial and editorial portrait photographer based in Florida and Dallas (It’s currently 81 degrees outside). He enjoys hiking with his 9-year-old daughter and the Texas Two-Step. His portraiture recently won an American Photography 30 award and a PDN World in Focus award. He was also selected to be a part of Eddie Adams Workshop XXV. If he wasn’t a photographer, he would be a competitive barbeque smoker. Please contact him directly to see what his photography can do for you.

APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world. She has been involved in the photography and illustration industry since the mid 80s, after founding the art buying department at The Martin Agency then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies. She has a new Twitter fed with helpful marketing information.  Follow her@SuzanneSease.

Categories: Business

Frog In The Water

ASMP's Strictly Business - Thu, 02/12/2015 - 12:01am

[by Barry Schwartz]

Over the last couple of years, I had an “aha” moment that was more like an “uh-oh” moment – not even a moment, more like a slow unfolding of embarrassment.

I teach a class in business practices for photographers at a local college, focused on developing a holistic view to building a career, consisting of, roughly, three main parts:

1. Technical knowledge. You can’t do any gig of any kind if you don’t have chops, just that simple. This is not news to anyone. Well, maybe a few people. At any rate, I don’t spend a lot of time on how to make pictures; that’s not the subject of the class. I talk about computer health and happiness and building an efficient digital workflow, however, which is otherwise rarely covered in school. And backing up. You can never do enough backing up.

2. Business practices. This is primarily why people come to the class, and I cover legal issues such as copyright, releases, and contracts, along with marketing, negotiating, networking, and all the different kinds of careers a photographer can have. Proposals and contracts, particularly, scare people. And negotiating – scares them the most.

3. Understanding the cultures of clients. Emerging photographers must comprehend what their clients need and how their businesses work. They need to feel their clients’ pain. They need to do research. This is a big one, and for some students, the hardest to grasp. Part-and-parcel are people skills like how to dress, talk, write, and act. (Spell check! Call when late!) We talk about how social media is different for professionals than for civilians. No beer-bong photos on Facebook.

This leads to focusing on what clients need to see on a photographer’s website. During class, we spend a whole lot of time looking hard at photographers’ websites, and I try to pass along what I have been told by photographers and particularly what I’ve heard countless photo editors, art buyers, reps, gallerists, and art directors say they want to see. Which, since you asked, consists of: big pictures that load fast, clear navigation, make it really easy to find your contact information. The basics. And links to social media so people can find out more about you, whether you’re a freelancer or looking for a job as an employee (remember the beer-bong photos?).

So. My aha moment occurred while staring at the ceiling at three in the morning after my business had slowed to a crawl. After some number of nights of this behavior (I will not reveal how many) I came to understand I had not been taking advice I give to my own students: my website was bloated with too many categories, each stuffed with too many pictures. The photos were not big enough and the sequencing not that great. Navigation was clunky. I was not doing enough active marketing (phone calls and emails). I was not doing nearly enough social media (OK, almost no social media). I could go on, but I think I’ve embarrassed myself enough already.

So I went to town on my site, fixed the pictures, re-did my bio, added a blog and a Tumblr, started using Facebook like a professional and got my Linkedin profile up to snuff. I made my proposals and contracts “friendlier”. I made marketing calls and wrote follow-up emails. It worked, I got busier.

It was like the story of the frog placed in a pan of water on the stove, with the water getting slowly heated so the frog doesn’t even realize what’s happening and never saves itself. This is a little morbid as an analogy, but it points out the importance of staying alert, awake, and flexible. You don’t need to be a frog to understand the value of that.

Barry Schwartz is a photographers, writer, and educator in Los Angeles who actually likes frogs but much prefers the company of dogs.

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

From WTF!?! to AHA!!

ASMP's Strictly Business - Wed, 02/11/2015 - 12:01am

[by Carolyn Potts]

Last week I had an AHA moment that could have easily become an OMG! WTF!! moment.

While putting together my slides for my “Rebooting your Business Brain 2.0” seminar for the ASMP Houston chapter, my Keynote presentation (Apple’s version of PowerPoint) endured a terminal crash. Despite 4.5 hrs. with a senior tech support specialist at Apple (which even included reinstalling the software), I was told my files could not be recovered; I had to rebuild the entire presentation from scratch–less than 48 hrs. before I was to appear on stage.

Anyone reading this post likely has their own version of a similar Murphy’s law software or hardware meltdown. In fact, I’ve had it happen in the past, too–but not nearly as spectacular in its timing as this time. It usually has caused a thunderstorm of emotional stress and negative emotions.

But this time my experience was different.

Those who know me well, or who heard me speak last week, know that I’m a recent fan of the regular practice of meditation and also a fan of neuroscience. Mainstream media has had many recent reports of leaders in both the arts and in business who are urging their followers to embrace the practice of meditation and science backs them up.

In his documentary film, Meditation, Creativity and Peace, filmmaker, artist, and musician, David Lynch, a meditator for over 40 years, shares how Transcendental Meditation has powerfully supported his creative process. (If you want to know what meditation actually does to your brain, there’s an interesting explanation at about the halfway point during the 40 min. Q&A video about the film.)

The Harvard Business Review’s recent article “Mindfulness Can Literally Change Your Brain” goes deeper into reporting on the effects that meditation has on rewiring the brain’s neural connections which can lead to more effective business management skills. The recommendation is that: “Mindfulness should no longer be considered a “nice-to-have” for executives. It’s a “must-have”:  a way to keep our brains healthy, to support self-regulation and effective decision-making capabilities, and to protect ourselves from toxic stress.”

And that’s where I got my AHA! moment. I realized that my many months of meditation had literally rewired my brain. When the “stuff” hit the fan and my presentation was lost, I did not react in the manner that I had during past tech crises. I did not freak out. My brain had been rewired.

With a calm mind that is the benefit of meditation, I was able to stay out of fear, panic and negativity–psychological states that I know do not create the conditions necessary to solve a problem effectively. When you are calm and fully present to a challenging situation, you bring your creative best to the situation and are therefore more able to discern and intuit novel ways to solve the problem.

Consider the camera equipment or imaging software failures you’ve endured in the course of your career. Has a negative mental state ever produced a great creative product? It seems that when the mind is present, calm, and grateful that creative insights and good works usually arrive.

I realized it’s up to me to create and maintain the fertile mental ground to support those mental states but when I do, new solutions magically appear. Aha!!

Outside of the 20 min. that creative consultant, Carolyn Potts spends in meditation each morning, Carolyn spends her days helping talented and proactive photographers take their businesses to the next level and get more work. Connect with her at www.cpotts.com, on Facebook and Google+.

Categories: Business, Photo Industry

Friend or Foe? Social Networks and Your Image Rights

Photo Business Forum - Tue, 02/10/2015 - 4:35pm
Which of the well-known social media websites - Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter, take a perpetual license to your images? By now, you should already know the answer - all of them, to varying degrees.

I would like to suggest to you that you should stay off Facebook, but that would be all but impossible. What I will tell you is that you should never post images from a shoot where not only could your client see the images (unless, of course, a part of your obligation to your client is to promote the results of your shoot via social media) but also, where the simple fact that you are granting the social media website rights to the image would violate the terms of the agreement you have with your client to the resulting images. It would be very easy for a client to cite this as a reason to not pay you, and otherwise to pursue you in court as well. To that end be absolutely certain you have the right to do that in writing.

Because social media has reached a critical mass, and it is difficult to ignore from a professional standpoint, where in many cases marketing your work is done via the social networking of today.  So, to that end, how do you make the sacrifices that their rights grabs call for while preserving your rights or at least understanding the value of the rights you are granting to them. Colby Brown (here) does a great job of breaking down many of the different social media issues. The bottom line is that most photographers that shoot weddings, rights of passage events like Bar Mitzvahs, and family portraits, will find a solid prospective client base on Facebook.  However, a commercial photographer could well be followed, and thus seen as actively out shooting projects, by art directors as well.

The American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP) has done an exceptional job of detailing what the latest Terms of Service means to you, the photographer. Visit this link to learn more, but here's one excerpt regarding the latest changes:
"These changes appear to allow Facebook to exploit your name, likeness, content, images, private information, and personal brand by using it in advertising and in commercial and sponsored content — without any compensation to you. Facebook claims the right to monetize, not just your images, but a sizable portion of your entire online identity."My first recommendation, then, is to NOT upload a high resolution image to Facebook (I realize that suggesting you don't upload any images isn't likely going to be a viable option). There's no reason to do that. Of course, a sizable online image can easily be repurposed by those with nefarious intent, especially when they have online intentions for the work they'll infringe of yours, so a watermark is always important. More on that later. Many photographers are uploading 720 pixel images on the long side, and certainly no more than 1,000 pixels.

How might you upload images in a respectable workflow to Facebook and Twitter then?

(Continued after the Jump)


We use a workflow we recently expanded to include an service called ProPic. Before that, we would capture, enhance/adjust, watermark, and then upload. We've changed our "enhance/adjust" application to be Process instead of Snapseed. Neither one does watermarking, but there's more to that within the Process/ProPic workflow. Here's how we do it:

Capture the image as you normally would, and the images are stored in the devices Camera Roll. We continue to use the default iPhone app because it is the only one accessible from the Lock screen, and also, allows for the switch between the still camera and the video camera. Until we can re-assign the icon there to a different app, we're sticking with this.


From within Camera Roll, identify the best image you want to share. One of the problems with capturing and processing images within a different app, like using Process, which can capture the image, is we often will shoot more than one, so we just want to select and process the best image.



Open up the Process App, and process as you see fit.  The app is not free, currently it's $14.99, and well worth it. I used to use Snapseed, and while I like that, integrating the ProPic capability alone is worth paying for this app. This app is not associated with ProPic other than it being able to upload to ProPic.




Click the “share” icon, which is located in the upper right corner







When the "share" window appears, instead of choosing Mail or Twitter, choose instead ProPic. You may also want to choose "Save Image" at the left, as Process won't save the finished file to your Camera Roll unless you ask it to. Select the ProPic icon(you should already have a ProPic account set up)















Type in a caption or other description to accompany the photo. Select to additionally post it to Facebook and Twitter at the same time using the two switches, then click Send.








The resulting image sent has a Copyright Notice added alongwith a thin black border. The image resides in your ProPic web account, which you can access at www.ProPic.com. The same image is posted to Twitter as well as to your Facebook account. If you want a larger watermark or copyright notice, then before entering Process, use an application like Marksta, or the one we prefer, iWatermark, to add in a larger watermark.




For more information on the importance of watermarking, and how you can use the Digital Millennium Copyright Act to pursue copyright infringements (even without registering your copyright with the copyright office) check the blog here for this law firm.


Here is the resulting image as would then appear on Facebook:


It's important to note that while ProPic does not take any of your rights like Facebook and Twitter do, whatever the current rights position is on those social media websites still remains.

digg_url = 'WEBSITE_URL'; digg_bgcolor = '#161d23';digg_skin = 'compact';
Please post your comments by clicking the link below. If you've got questions, please pose them in our Photo Business Forum Flickr Group Discussion Threads.
Categories: Business

House Judiciary Committee - Orphan Works and the PLUS Solution

Photo Business Forum - Tue, 02/10/2015 - 4:34pm
On April 2, 2014 - Congress' House Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet held a hearing titled Preservation and reuse of Copyrighted Works about orphan works, and asked for insights into matters regarding the need to preserve copyrighted works.

Testimony was heard from the Library of Congress, Gregory Lukow, Chief, Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation, The Library of Congress (testimony PDF); Mr. Richard Rudick, Co-Chair, Section 108 Study Group (testimony .doc file); Mr. James Neal, Vice President for Information Services and University Librarian, Columbia University (testimony PDF); Ms. Jan Constantine, General Counsel, The Authors Guild (testimony .doc file); Mr. Michael C. Donaldson, Partner, Donaldson + Callif, LLP (testimony PDF); and Mr. Jeffrey Sedlik, President and Chief Executive Officer, PLUS Coalition (testimony PDF). Much of the testimony was about preservation, and the questioning of the need for new laws related to orphan works was discussed at length over the course of two hours.



Jeff Sedlik's PLUS Coalition testimony proved to be most relevant to visual artists, given the presentation of PLUS as a solution to the problem of orphan works. Prior to the hearing, Sedlik spoke with the committee chairman, Rep. Howard Coble (R-NC) (as seen below).

Below is a video that combines Sedlik's testimony from the hearing - it's well worth watching to better understand how orphan works will return to the fore, and what is being done to solve the problem.

(Continued after the Jump)

Disclaimer: I sit on the boards of the American Society of Media Photographers and the National Press Photographers Association, both of whom have provided substantial funds to support the development of PLUS. Each organizations' initial funding of PLUS pre-dates my role on the boards.
digg_url = 'WEBSITE_URL'; digg_bgcolor = '#161d23';digg_skin = 'compact';
Please post your comments by clicking the link below. If you've got questions, please pose them in our Photo Business Forum Flickr Group Discussion Threads.
Categories: Business

CalumetPhoto - Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

Photo Business Forum - Tue, 02/10/2015 - 4:34pm
While rumors have been swirling for much of the day on Wednesday, the story about whether or not the storied camera store chain CalumetPhoto has filed for bankruptcy have come true.

Calumetphoto.com LLC has voluntarily filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, listed as case #14-08908 in the Northern District of Illinois United States Bankruptcy Court. The filing is dated March 12, 2014 and the first meeting is scheduled on April 22, 2014.



CalumetPhoto, in recent months, has been pulling back from their participation in activities they have, in the past, normally sponsored or been involved in, and there have been grumblings amongst store management as well as serious concerns raised by some equipment manufacturing representatives and vendors as well. While many companies file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in order to reorganize, sources tell Photo Business News that while CalumetPhoto tried this route, ultimately they found themselves in Chapter 7 bankruptcy, which is the phase companies end up in when Chapter 11 does not work, and the company has to liquidate.

CalumetPhoto, founded in 1939 grew to almost 3 dozen stores nationwide, and, in recent years, most notably acquired the Penn Camera camera stores in 2012 in the Washington DC region after they had gone into Chapter 11 bankruptcy. After shedding 5 of the 8 locations, the remaining 3 were intended to continue to fulfill the various government contracts that Penn Camera had acquired over the years, as a hopeful source of ongoing revenue for the beleaguered company.

(Continued after the Jump)
According to court documents (see below) CalumetPhoto lists assets of less than $50k, and estimated liabilities in excess of $1,000,000, and 585 debtors:



All CalumetPhoto stores in the United States are closed, and classes have been cancelled and their @calumetphoto twitter account is now non-existent, yet there were posts on their Facebook account up until mid-day Wednesday. The overseas CalumetPhoto stores in the EU remain operational. According to Seng Ng, the Director of Finance for CalumetPhoto U.K., when asked how this will affect the UK store, responded "not at all" continuing "we share the same name but are two distinct entities." Their website remains operational and stores there are open.

Late in the day Wednesday, visitors to the Calumetphoto.com website found it non-operational, as below:



Reports from current and former employees and individual store management have reportedly been detailing the trials and tribulations of their times at CalumetPhoto and the state of the company has reportedly not been well.

The PDF of the court filing can be viewed here, as a PDF.



-------------------

Update: At about 10:30am Eastern time, CalumetPhoto posted this on their Facebook page:

digg_url = 'WEBSITE_URL'; digg_bgcolor = '#161d23';digg_skin = 'compact';
Please post your comments by clicking the link below. If you've got questions, please pose them in our Photo Business Forum Flickr Group Discussion Threads.
Categories: Business

Copyright Office Roundtable Discussion on Orphan Works - 2014 Edition

Photo Business Forum - Tue, 02/10/2015 - 4:33pm
The United States Copyright Office brought together stakeholders from across the spectrum of intellectual property producers and consumers to discuss various ways to approach the issue of orphaned works during two days of roundtable discussions Monday March 10th and Tuesday March 11th, 2014, held at the Library of Congress in Washington DC.

Almost six years ago, we here at Photo Business News wrote Orphan Works Act = Thieves Charter? which delved into what the bills that were proposed to be law were espousing. We followed that up with Orphan Works - History In the Making, and we even wrote about the problems with the bills then, espousing the need for a solution to orphaned works, just not the one that was being proposed, in Orphan Works 2008 - A Wolf In Sheep's Clothing. We even produced a piece titled Orphan Works - A Unique Set of "Myths" and "Facts" in an attempt to dispel some of the myths surrounding orphan works as proposed.

While the problem has not changed, the public and the stakeholders are much more engaged on the matter now, and the discourse seems to be taking a more reasoned approach. The Association of Research Libraries, for example, has changed their position from a call for orphan works legislation to an approach that utilities fair use. Here, they note "Unlike any option that will require legislative action, fair use is already the law...certain rightsholder groups are sufficiently fearful about misuse of their abandoned property that seemingly no search will be sufficiently diligent for them."

One thing is clear, this time around, the provisions of the bills that we will likely see in the next iteration will be better and more clear than what was in the 2008 bills. Below are a series of images from the roundtable discussions on the subject.
Over a hundred people came together to participate and listen to participate in a roundtable discussion on Orphan Works/Mass Digitization, Monday, March 10, 2014 at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The roundtable discussion, held over the course of two days, is being held by the US Copyright Office to gather insights for future legislative solutions to orphaned works. Photo: © 2014 John Harrington.


Karyn Temple Claggett Associate Register of Copyrights and Director of Policy and International Affairs listens to remarks during a roundtable discussion on Orphan Works/Mass Digitization, Monday, March 10, 2014 at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The roundtable discussion, held over the course of two days, is being held by the US Copyright Office to gather insights for future legislative solutions to orphaned works. Photo: © 2014 John Harrington.


Eugene Mopsik, Executive Director of the American Society of Media Photographers, Left, makes remarks during a roundtable discussion on Orphan Works/Mass Digitization as Jeff Sedlik, CEO of the PLUS Coalition, right, looks on, Monday, March 10, 2014 at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The roundtable discussion, held over the course of two days, is being held by the US Copyright Office to gather insights for future legislative solutions to orphaned works. Photo: © 2014 John Harrington.


Jeff Sedlik, right, CEO of the PLUS Coalition makes remarks during a roundtable discussion on Orphan Works/Mass Digitization, Monday, March 10, 2014 at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The roundtable discussion, held over the course of two days, is being held by the US Copyright Office to gather insights for future legislative solutions to orphaned works. Photo: © 2014 John Harrington.


Mickey Osterricher, general counsel for the National Press Photographers Association makes remarks during a roundtable discussion on Orphan Works/Mass Digitization, Monday, March 10, 2014 at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The roundtable discussion, held over the course of two days, is being held by the US Copyright Office to gather insights for future legislative solutions to orphaned works. Photo: © 2014 John Harrington.


(More photos, after the Jump)
Douglas Hill, right, managing partner of Rights Assist, makes remarks during a roundtable discussion on Orphan Works/Mass Digitization as Colin Rushing, General Counsel of Sound Exchange, looks on, Monday, March 10, 2014 at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The roundtable discussion, held over the course of two days, is being held by the US Copyright Office to gather insights for future legislative solutions to orphaned works. Photo: © 2014 John Harrington.


Rob Kasunic, Associate Register of Copyrights and Director of Registration Policy and Practices, U.S. Copyright Office makes remarks during a roundtable discussion on Orphan Works/Mass Digitization, Monday, March 10, 2014 at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The roundtable discussion, held over the course of two days, is being held by the US Copyright Office to gather insights for future legislative solutions to orphaned works. Photo: © 2014 John Harrington.


Nancy Wolff, right, counsel for the Picture Agency Council of America makes remarks during a roundtable discussion on Orphan Works/Mass Digitization as Mickey Osterricher left looks on, Monday, March 10, 2014 at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The roundtable discussion, held over the course of two days, is being held by the US Copyright Office to gather insights for future legislative solutions to orphaned works. Photo: © 2014 John Harrington.


Over a hundred people came together to participate and listen to participate in a roundtable discussion on Orphan Works/Mass Digitization, Monday, March 10, 2014 at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The roundtable discussion, held over the course of two days, is being held by the US Copyright Office to gather insights for future legislative solutions to orphaned works. Photo: © 2014 John Harrington.


Eric Harbeson of the Society of American Archivists makes remarks during a roundtable discussion on Orphan Works/Mass Digitization, Monday, March 10, 2014 at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The roundtable discussion, held over the course of two days, is being held by the US Copyright Office to gather insights for future legislative solutions to orphaned works. Photo: © 2014 John Harrington.


Karyn Temple Claggett Associate Register of Copyrights and Director of Policy and International Affairs listens to remarks during a roundtable discussion on Orphan Works/Mass Digitization, Monday, March 10, 2014 at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The roundtable discussion, held over the course of two days, is being held by the US Copyright Office to gather insights for future legislative solutions to orphaned works. Photo: © 2014 John Harrington.


Maria Matthews, manager, Copyright & Government Affairs at Professional Photographers of America makes remarks to remarks during a roundtable discussion on Orphan Works/Mass Digitization as Charles Sanders of the Songwriters Guild of America looks on, Monday, March 10, 2014 at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The roundtable discussion, held over the course of two days, is being held by the US Copyright Office to gather insights for future legislative solutions to orphaned works. Photo: © 2014 John Harrington.


digg_url = 'WEBSITE_URL'; digg_bgcolor = '#161d23';digg_skin = 'compact';
Please post your comments by clicking the link below. If you've got questions, please pose them in our Photo Business Forum Flickr Group Discussion Threads.
Categories: Business

Pages