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Former Photography Director Rob Haggart
Updated: 8 min 49 sec ago

The Daily Promo: Daniel Dorsa

Mon, 02/08/2016 - 9:38am

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Daniel Dorsa


Who printed it?
The cassette tapes were made by MilkTape, I printed the J Cards myself, and the business card was printed by Mama Sauce.

Who designed it?
A long term friend of mine, Devin Jacocviello, designed the tape as well my business cards.

Who edited the images?
I edited the images myself.

How many did you make?
I made a limited run of the thirty.

How many times a year do you send out promos?
This is my first promo ever so I’ve only mailed out one a year!  I plan on sending out promos twice a year though.

How did this promo idea develop?
I decided to create this promo for a few different reasons. First off, I love music and have loved it since I was young. I would create mixtapes of the radio and share them with friends. Once CD’s and downloading became prevalent, I was making tons of mix CD’s for my friends in high school and would always be having new music bump in my car. Without really realizing it, it was my first form of creative expression.

While figuring out what type of promo to make, I was a bit unsure the best route. I was considering making a zine, but I felt like people may not really pay attention to it if the work didn’t speak to them directly. I wanted to make something a bit obscure so that people would give my work a chance, but also practical. My roommate suggested I make vinyl records and send those with a zine, but there was no real concept with that. That suggestion though got me thinking of something relating to my love for music and after some research, I found these tapes. It was the perfect blend of something practical, interesting, and personal. It took months for me to actually receive the tapes, but it was well worth it.

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Categories: Business

This Week In Photography Books: Karen Knorr

Fri, 02/05/2016 - 9:47am

by Jonathan Blaustein

It’s Tuesday, the morning after the Iowa Caucuses. (When I’m writing this. You’re likely reading on Friday, of course.)

Today marks the beginning of the end of Donald Trump’s incessant march to colonize Earth. Wouldn’t you just love to see the TRUMP insignia emblazoned on the side of the White House? I mean, after you moved to Canada, wouldn’t you find it funny? (Instead of tragic and/or shocking?)

I’ve said since the first Republican debate that my money was on Marco Rubio, so I’m sticking with that. The Republicans have a great habit of rallying around whomever is “most electable,” and he fits the bill.

Ted Cruz, who won the contest, seems more unlikeable than a genetically engineered TRex that’s about to eat your face off. A smugger man, I’ve not yet seen. And the hubris to pretend to be a man “of the people” when you’re educated at Princeton and Harvard?

We haven’t witnessed that degree of fakery since George W. was photographed “clearing brush” in Texas. (Oh George. Where have you gone? How we miss your bumbling mispronunciations.)

No, Ted Cruz will not be the next President of the United States. You heard it here. But then, neither will the Donald, a man who would gladly take the Malkovichian punishment of living inside his own head, surrounded by clones who spoke only his own name, were he given the chance.

“Trump?”

“Trump.”

“Trump Trump Trump?”

“Trump Trump.”

If we’ve learned anything from Donald’s six-month-performance-art-piece, it’s that how much money you have is not a marker of your intelligence, nor your worth to the rest of us. That guy clearly has billions, but he acts like a scared, insecure bully on the playground, making sure to charge $5 admission to the swing-set, just because he can.

He may have money, but as they say, money can’t buy class. In this case, I actually speak from experience. Back in 1996, I worked on a movie called “The Devil’s Advocate,” and personally delivered a $50,000 check to his assistant, made out to Donald Trump, for the use of his 57th St penthouse for ONE DAY.

That’s right. 50 grand for a day, not that he needed the money. The walls were covered in plated gold, something I’ve never seen before or since. Tacky beyond belief. An Emperor is how the man sees himself. (A taller Napoleon with bad hair.)

But gold walls or gold toilets do not make a better person. Not better than any of us. Just better at wasting precious resources.

The homes we live in, the trinkets we acquire, the animal pelts we collect, these do not reflect the quality of our character. The idea of aristocracy was misguided from the beginning. Much as some would like to believe it grew out of a reality that some families are superior to others, I’d proffer that it’s simply that some are driven to acquire wealth and power by any means necessary.

And others are not.

As I rarely get political, (though I’ve staunchly avoided mention of whom I support in 2016,) I couldn’t help myself after looking at “Belgravia,” a new book by Karen Knorr, released last year by Stanley/Barker.

Once you see it, the above rant will fit snugly into context, like a medicine cap on a bottle of Prozac. As the book brings us inside the homes, and minds, of the English elite, circa 1976. (Has there ever been a more photogenic decade?)

According to the end notes, though not hard to suss out from the content, Belgravia is a posh neighborhood in London, near Buckingham Palace. It is likely to West London conservatism what the East End is to hipsterism these days. (And if I’m wrong, I’m sure one of our many London-based readers will correct me.)

The portraits, staged in fancy rooms with grand fireplaces, are paired with snippets of conversation the artist recalled from chatting with her subjects. They fit, in the sense that we can imagine “these people” saying such things, despite the obvious artifice.

My favorite part was that several of the crops are not clean. Photographs like this, of formal people in formal rooms, are so often meticulously made. Every cut is perfect. Each composition as exacting as a valet cleaning off a just-used dinner jacket.

But these are rougher than that. They’re close to formal, but often deviate in observable ways. Rebellion, via composition? And the lighting is not perfect either. It’s often flat, rather than glamourous.

I counted at least 2 zebra-pelts, assuming they’re real. And other objects collected from around the Empire. Lions, cheetahs, elephants. Knick-knacks from the hinterlands.

Honestly, I didn’t love this book. But that’s the point, no? These people aren’t lovable. They’re just rich. They look normal, for the most part. (Not the Platonic ideal of a human, like a baby made by the unholy English union of David Beckham and Sienna Miller.)

That’s what the Upper Class look like in our minds, no? All jutting, cleft chins and wide-set blue eyes. They look better than we do, attended superior schools, so they deserve to rule?

No, this book just shows some lonely-looking, repressed rich people, clinging to their religion and their guns. (Sorry. That was an Obama quote.) I mean, clinging to their fancy things and big rooms.

Bottom Line: Ironic, old school pics of the British ruling Elite

To Purchase “Belgravia” Visit Photo-Eye

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Categories: Business

The Art of the Personal Project: Russ Quackenbush

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 9:41am

As a former Art Producer, I have always been drawn to personal projects because they are the sole vision of the photographer and not an extension of an art director, photo editor, or graphic designer. This new column, “The Art of the Personal Project” will feature the personal projects of photographers using the Yodelist marketing database. You can read their blog at http://yodelist.wordpress.com. Projects are discovered online and submissions are not accepted.

Today’s featured photographer is: Russ Quackenbush

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How long have you been shooting?
I’ve been shooting professionally for 20 years.

Are you self-taught or photography school taught?
I have a BFA from the Art Institute of Boston now called Lesley College of Art and Design.

With this particular project, what was your inspiration to shoot it?
My wife at the time had a storefront space on Lincoln Blvd in Santa Monica, CA. I stopped by one day while she was prepping for a job and noticed a decent amount of interesting people walking by. I learned that some of the people were getting their car washed on one side and walking buy to Starbucks on the other side. I ended up renting a space next to hers for a short period of time. So I set up a backdrop and one light and decided to photograph these people as they were passing by. I offered them 5 dollars to answer 5 questions and then sit for four minutes. Which turned into 5 minutes of total time. The inspiration was that I got to meet all these cool people that I might have never otherwise.

How many years have you been shooting this project before you decided to present it?
I only worked on it off and on for about 6 months. Then I moved out of the space and haven’t touched it since.

How long do you spend on a personal project before deciding if it is working?
That a great question! It’s something I’ve struggled with throughout my career. Not the knowing if I like it part, but the continuation of completion. I tend to get tired of projects that I start and move on. They never end, but just go dormant. I have several projects that I’d like to continue at some point. To answer your question, I guess if I like it enough to hang it on my wall then it’s working for me.

Since shooting for your portfolio is different from personal work, how do you feel when the work is different?
I don’t see the two as being different. I shoot what I like and then it goes into the portfolio. Not all my personal projects are a perfect fit for the portfolio, but I’ll still put them up online for a little while. It’s really important to follow that inspiration your feeling because it will always bring something new to your work. My Wild Kingdom series isn’t in my portfolio, but it’s something I enjoy shooting and now I have some images for my wall.

Have you ever posted your personal work on social media venues such as Reddit, Tumblr, Instagram or Facebook?
I tend to use social media more as a timeline of my personal life than for marketing. Some stuff goes up on Facebook but it’s pretty small in comparison to my personal stuff.

If so, has the work ever gone viral and possibly with great press?
Not as of yet! Perhaps, this post could be the first to get that ball rolling :-)

Have you printed your personal projects for your marketing to reach potential clients?
All the time! That’s the most important thing for any photographer. Show your personal work.

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Russ Quackenbush creates visual images of humanity that reflect the qualities we cherish most in each other. In his portraiture, he gently documents the relics of a subject’s life experiences as they unfold and present themselves in the emotions of their face, the language of their body, and the energy of their being. Russ’ photography gives us license to laugh, play, rejoice, or to mourn. It is through his images that we are led respectfully and thoughtfully into the life of another.

Emotionally charged landscape photography compliments his portraiture work. Russ embraces the powerful energy of place as presented to him in textures, tones, and colors. Through these he creates a complex visual record that conveys the rich history of the site. One gets a clear sense of what has come before and what is destined to be.

It is these same sensibilities that he brings to his work in commercial advertising. Traveling throughout the United States and abroad, Russ is always inspired by new environments and motivated by new challenges. Ultimately, it is his love of photography that is reflected in final result.

Upon starting his business in 1996, he has received a myriad of awards from the Photography and Advertising Annuals of Communication Arts, The Ad Club, and The One Show. Creativity Magazine, Archive, and Photo District News have all featured Russ and his work. It was 2001, that Photo District News distinguished Russ in their “30 Under 30”, presenting him as a young talent worth keeping an eye on. He has certainly lived up to that prediction.


APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world. She has been involved in the photography and illustration industry since the mid 80s, after establishing the art buying department at The Martin Agency then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies. She has a new Twitter feed with helpful marketing information believing that marketing should be driven by a brand and not specialty. Follow her on twitter at SuzanneSease.

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Categories: Business

What Happens When Your Images Go Viral: Eric Pickersgill’s REMOVED

Wed, 02/03/2016 - 9:36am

by Efrem Zelony-Mindell, aCurator

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You’ve probably seen and possibly heard the story of Eric Pickersgill’s body of work: REMOVED. How Eric noticed a family in a coffee shop all staring at their personal devices and simultaneously feeling disgusted dejected and realizing that he was that same family. So he created a series of images with the phones removed, “to show just how weird that can be”.

What you probably haven’t heard is what happens to a photographer when a series of images goes viral. And what can be done to harness some of that viral-ity to money and attention to the photographer whose images have been co-opted by the internet.

“It happened so fast. It still seems a little unreal,” Pickersgill chuckles. 2015 was already shaping up to be a great year for him as an emerging photographer, even before a friend at Business Insider asked to feature his work. Business Insider was the start. Views of Pickersgill’s feature quickly went from a few hundred to tens of thousands. A day later the work started popping up on other blog’s and online publications. How is a little hazy, as some of these early posts were used without an e-mail to him. This additional coverage helped push the work further; this is when sensible inquiries started. USE USE USE, WANT WANT WANT, e-mail after e-mail requesting images for publications we view every day.

The emails quickly ramped up to over 300 a day and Eric says, “money floated into my mind as an afterthought, but I soon realized I was going to need some help.” Almost without exception, the expectation was that images would be given for publication for free. He did not get too many “it will be great exposure for you” insults, but the sense was he would be eager to be published. And Eric was very eager to be published and a number of websites and blogs benefitted.

On the third day of this Eric called photo professional Julie Grahame, who he was introduced to by a mutual business friend. “I wasn’t sure the first time we spoke. I thought the work might just fizzle,” Grahame said. It’s funny to note that both Pickersgill and Grahame shared this thought upon first interactions before they agreed on working together. Pickersgill quickly came back around to Grahame after a day or so attempting the Internet solo. “Other countries started calling for the work. The Netherlands, South Africa, on and on.”

With so many inquiries on the table, Julie set out with Eric to prioritize those likely to have a budget. They agreed to just not get back to a bunch of people until they had managed the more practical clients. That was hard for Eric, he had to understand he wasn’t being rude, he was just staying sane. A couple of things likely slipped through the cracks, because it was so overwhelming, but they soon had several invoices out to various countries, and as each publication came out, they perpetuated the interest.

“Some clients I expected to have a budget said no, and when we refused to play, managed to find a little bit of cash”, says Julie of their interactions with clients. One German journalist said “I’m sure they do have a budget, I’ve just never seen it used” and then found them $200. They had to be creative and flexible – one client who Eric did an interview with had to process the fee as an equipment expense. With all the best intentions and efforts it is difficult to get a publisher to pay up-front but they did manage it on a few occasions.

Lots of people wanted interviews as well, but they still insisted on license fees for the majority of them. They also let go a bunch of websites who used images without permission that they felt it would be impractical to pursue.

“Collecting the money is the usual ongoing effort but we’ve done really well!”, says Julie, “I would like to add we have negotiated licenses that include an ad campaign, and a music video.” (As an aside, managing tax issues and incoming wire transfers from all over the world is a bit of a pain.)

There were also several requests for prints but Eric decided that “instead of jumping to make quick sales, he waited until he found a gallery who was interested in the work and who would then fulfill the print requests for him.” This manifested in an enthusiastic agreement with Rick Wester Fine Art, in New York within a month of going viral.

Family sitting next to me at Illium café in Troy, NY is so disconnected from one another. Not much talking. Father and two daughters have their own phones out. Mom doesn’t have one or chooses to leave it put away. She stares out the window, sad and alone in the company of her closest family. Dad looks up every so often to announce some obscure piece of info he found online. Twice he goes on about a large fish that was caught. No one replies. Eric is saddened by the use of technology for interaction in exchange for not interacting. This has never happened before and he doubts we have scratched the surface of the social impact of this new experience. Mom has her phone out now. This is Pickersgill’s story, this is how it all began.

The photos are deeper, they delve into a history of portraiture, and they are as sculptural as they are narrative. Pickersgill’s images bridge a gap between fine art and editorial. They are full of repose and gesture and curiously, the hands of the subjects with their devices removed, create a nebulous sense of vacuum. Composition informs the subject’s relation; tonality and print quality capture awkward moments of estranged intimacy. In Pickersgill’s own words, “I have a strong connection to the body and photographing people.”

REMOVED incites a certain sense of joy hidden in the images’ absurdity. That’s not to say they’re a joke, laughter ensues because the photos allow a viewer to realize just how complicated they’ve made themselves. There’s a freedom in that.

Eric’s future isn’t clear, but there’s a whole lot of potential. The work will continue, and so too will the obsession with REMOVED. As long as people need reminding it seems pretty clear Pickersgill will have subjects to photograph. The body goes on adapting and relying, submitting itself. And maybe that’s the ultimate realization the work can impart. I don’t get the feeling that his photos are trying to say put down the technology, but to grow with each other and to raise the platform. The blinking lights and fun little gadgets will catch up.

Efrem Zelony-Mindell, aCurator

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Categories: Business

The Daily Edit – Kenji Aoki: Real Simple

Tue, 02/02/2016 - 9:42am

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Real Simple

Creative Director: Janet Froelich
Photo Editor: Alice Jones

Photo Editor: Emily Kinni
Photographer: Kenji Aoki

 


What type of direction did you get from the magazine?
The magazine was seeking something conceptual and abstract based on some of my earlier work.

Tell us about your creative process for this simple, elegant solution for stress.
The article was about stress and how stress can be a positive motivation depending on its type and cause; so I thought about these four key words from the article: “Chaos”, “Calm”, “Pressure”, and “Relief/Release.”I find working through language in this way is often the most important first step before shooting.

Is there a pattern to when or where you ideas occur?
Focusing on one word can conjure many images, in this case I felt I could best extract the essence of these concepts by using geometric conceptualizations. Rather than trying to think up ideas, I sought a resolution by ridding myself of all unnecessary information and focusing on these few words.

Do you have a journal for your ideas, sketchbook?
Having studied design, I find it very helpful to draw rough sketches before shooting, so yes, I keep a sketchbook.

What is that white ball of lines: fishing line, wire?
We used thread for “Chaos” and wire for “Calm”, but we tried to shoot them in such a way as to not be recognizable as such.

For the two contrasting opening spread images, how closely did you work with the art department on your ideas, especially for the type placement?
Prior to the magazine’s release, I wasn’t sure how exactly my images would be used. The typography and layout was done by Janet Froelich, the creative director. Her layouts are always amazing and I am always inspired by her work.

 

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Categories: Business

The Daily Promo : Elizabeth Cecil

Mon, 02/01/2016 - 8:34am

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Elizabeth Cecil

Who printed it?
Hemlock Printers

Who designed it? Who edited the images?
Melissa McGill (melissamcgillstudio.com)

Who designed it?
Claire Ellen Lindsey
 (claireellenlindsey.com)

How many did you make?
75

How many times a year do you send out promos?
2

What was your inspiration for this promo?
I’ve been working with Melissa McGill for the past few years on branding, editing, and creative direction. We have developed various promos to highlight my portrait, lifestyle and food photography as well as my personal work, with inspiration drawn directly from the work being considered. We focus on clearly communicating my core interests; color, light, nature and authenticity. It’s a collaboration that really flows! This recent promo booklet developed from appreciating the colors on my recent trips to St. Bart’s and Bali and wanting to tell a story using color to create a unifying thread through the book.

 

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Categories: Business

This Week In Photography Books: Edward Ranney

Fri, 01/29/2016 - 10:43am

by Jonathan Blaustein

Imagine you’re an Ancient Peruvian.

It’s 2500 years ago.

You live in a desert near the Pacific Ocean.

It’s hot outside, and terribly dry.

Let’s call you Catequil, which means God of Thunder and Lightning. (According to the Inca-themed-dog-naming website I found on the Internet. So it has to be true.)

You, Catequil, aren’t much good at weaving. Your Dad is a decent enough farmer, but it’s not for you. Your brother is a warrior like nobody’s business. Man, is that dude good at killing people.

But you? Your reflexes are not that quick. Nor are you terribly co-ordinated, in the traditional sense. And for whatever reason, you just don’t have the green thumb.

Most people don’t, this being the desert, of course, but your Dad is so good at it. The way he looks at you, it’s just heart-breaking. You know he’s thinking, “How can I have a son who can’t grow things? Who can’t fight? Such a disappointment, my Catequil.”

It’s pretty tough, all things considered. And right now, you’ve got a piece of peanut stuck in one of your back teeth, and it’s driving you crazy!

Then one day, your friend, Khuno, (which apparently means High Altitude Weather God) comes to you with a good idea. He just heard about a new job, doing construction, and it pays well. 10 peanuts a day! Can you imagine!

You and Khuno go and see the foreman.

“What are we building, sir,” you ask?

“Nothing.”

“Come again? Surely, if you’re paying so well, we must be building something important. A new temple? A food storage facility? A fortress? You can tell us. We’re good at keeping secrets.”

“No, I’m not deceiving you boys. We’re not building anything at all.”

“Then why are you hiring a crew?”

“Because we’re going to scrape some lines into the ground, so that the gods in the sky will smile down upon us, and bestow their bounty on our people.”

“Come again?”

“I said, we’re going to make shapes in the dirt that will make sense from the sky. Spiders. Monkeys. That sort of thing. But to us, they’ll just look like lines in the dirt.”

“OK. Sure. If you say so. But is it really paying 10 peanuts a day?”

“Absolutely. The high priests say this job is getting fast-tracked, so the compensation is particularly attractive. You should count yourself lucky. We only wanted Khuno because his name is considered auspicious for this project. He vouched for you, so you’re on the crew, if you want the job.”

End scene.

Did this actually happen?

Well, of course not. But something like it must have. How do I know? Because I just finished looking at “The Lines,” a relatively recent book by Edward Ranney, published by Yale University Press. (Mr. Ranney, a New Mexican, is my good friend’s father-in-law, FYI.)

If you’ve taken a Latin American Art History class, EVER, you’ve heard of the Nazca Lines. Large scale, Ancient Earth-Work art installations, designed to be seen by no human. Certainly, not until helicopters and planes were invented, which would not have been foreseen in Ancient Peru.

Aerial photography works well for such things, but Mr. Ranney, who has been photographing archaeological sites in Peru for decades, did it differently. These pictures deviate from our expectations, because they’re taken at ground level. We see from the perspective Catequil might have witnessed, were he not a figment of my imagination.

This book, in fact, contains photographs made in the 80’s, 90’s and Aughts. It feels like he took his time, as you ruminate on each picture. The patient vision. Squinting into the sunny desert light. Staring at the subtlety of almost nothing. Dirt on dirt.

That it’s black and white is almost self-evident, as how else could one speak to the terribly old and eternal? If Richard Misrach went down there with his big camera and some color film, he’d probably do a good job. But this kind of bleak needs grayscale.

The suggestion of deep time.

Normally, I would have opened this review with some rambling diatribe about human obsolescence. How we’re here for such a short time. How our civilizations, no matter how advanced, are likely to crumble to dust one of these days.

But that’s not how it went, is it?

No.

This book, thoughtful and serious though it is, transported me back through time. I imagined what I wrote, so I wrote it. There WERE people. They DID scratch into the landscape. They worked hard, over many, many years.

And for what? A dream? The belief they’d curry favor with the power in the sky? A good pay packet and dental insurance?

We’ll never know, I suppose. Sure, there might be actual archaeological research into the subject, instead of my ridiculous speculation, but if you wanted to read archaeological research, you wouldn’t be here, would you?

These pictures are really excellent. I love the pacing as well, though the book did run on a little longer than I might have done. For the first third, it’s totally spare. No signs of humanity anywhere.

Then, we see some power poles. And valley land that reads darker than the rest. Grass? Water? From where?

Unfortunately, this could well be what New Mexico looks like, one day, in the distant future. (If we don’t play our cards right.) Which is why visions like this, ripped from history, are so important at the present moment.

Bottom Line: Gorgeous, bleak photos of the Nazca lines, on the ground

To Purchase “The Lines” Visit Photo-Eye

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Visit our sponsor Photo Folio, providing websites to professional photographers for over 7 years. Featuring the only customizable template in the world.

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Categories: Business

The Art of the Personal Project: Steve & Anne Truppe

Thu, 01/28/2016 - 11:09am

As a former Art Producer, I have always been drawn to personal projects because they are the sole vision of the photographer and not an extension of an art director, photo editor, or graphic designer. This new column, “The Art of the Personal Project” will feature the personal projects of photographers using the Yodelist marketing database. You can read their blog at http://yodelist.wordpress.com. Projects are discovered online and submissions are not accepted.

Today’s featured photographer is: Steve & Anne Truppe

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How long have you been shooting?
5 years

Are you self-taught or photography school taught?
Self-taught

With this particular project, what was your inspiration to shoot it?
We have always been drawn to local businesses that combine good people, beautiful spaces, and delicious food, plus we are huge coffee junkies. Heritage General Store hits all of those high notes for us–it’s a killer coffee shop, they have their own line of bicycles, and it’s run by the sweetest people. We decided to document the energy and character of the environment to bring attention and support to this wonderful establishment.

How many years have you been shooting this project before you decided to present it?
This shoot only lasted a few hours, but the idea of it is deeply rooted in our beliefs of supporting local businesses that are doing great things.

How long do you spend on a personal project before deciding if it is working?
It really depends on how elaborate the idea is and how much production it involves. Sometimes it is only a few hours, sometimes it’s years. There was a shoot we did this year that involved live ducklings which we had to plan for months in advance and then wait for the little peepers to be born! Currently we are working on a personal video project that has taken almost a year to complete, so it really differs. We typically want to take the time to craft a cohesive story and vision for any personal project we work on, but sometimes it is nice to just dive into an environment and document things as they unfold like we did with Heritage General Store.

Since shooting for your portfolio is different from personal work, how do you feel when the work is different? It feels very freeing to shoot personal work, but also challenging. Sometimes we get bogged down by the daily grind, leaving little room for the creative juices to flow, but it is extremely rewarding to see our ideas materialize. We’ve also noticed that showing personal work has attracted prospective clients and ends up shaping and influencing our paid gigs.

Have you ever posted your personal work on social media venues such as Reddit, Tumblr, Instagram or Facebook?
Yes

If so, has the work ever gone viral and possibly with great press?
Not viral, but we have been featured on some great places: ADC Global, Working Not Working, and The Chicago Tribune.

Have you printed your personal projects for your marketing to reach potential clients?
We have! What we have found is that our personal work tends to be the thing that connects with people the most. Plus, since they are passion projects, there is an excitement that comes out when we talk about it which can be infectious.

Artist Statement
As photographers with backgrounds in architecture, we have always been inspired by what makes a place special. It’s the people, the details, the process, the design, and the environment that brings that story to life for us. With documenting Heritage General Store, we were given free reign by them to do what we needed to do, even allowing us to jump behind the bar with the barista. Diving right in like that helps us to create authentic imagery that gets to the heart of what a place is all about.

——————

Steve + Anne Truppe are a Chicago-based husband and wife photography and video team who strive to evoke emotion and authenticity in all of their work.

While studying architectural design at the same college, they quickly discovered how well their creative visions meshed, but decided to pursue a joint passion in photography instead. Together they established TRU STUDIO, shooting side by side on commercial and advertising projects.

Steve and Anne love to travel and explore new places while sipping delicious coffees. Every Friday Steve and Anne make homemade pizza, which they have dubbed ‘Pizza Friday!’


APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers and illustrators around the world. She has been involved in the photography and illustration industry since the mid 80s, after establishing the art buying department at The Martin Agency then working for Kaplan-Thaler, Capital One, Best Buy and numerous smaller agencies and companies. She has a new Twitter feed with helpful marketing information believing that marketing should be driven by a brand and not specialty. Follow her on twitter at SuzanneSease.

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Categories: Business

Pricing and Negotiating: Lifestyle Shoot for a Pharmaceutical Company

Wed, 01/27/2016 - 10:34am

by Wonderful Machine

Shoot Concept: Lifestyle images of two friends interacting

Licensing: Trade Advertising and Trade Collateral use of two images in the US for two years.

Location: A residential property

Shoot Days: 1

Photographer: Portraiture specialist in the Northeast.

Agency: Medium sized, based in the Midwest.

Client: A pharmaceutical company

Here is the estimate:

Creative/Licensing: While the creative brief called for one scenario and a single hero shot, the client hoped to acquire rights to two final images of the talent photographed in the same scenario, but with slight changes to their expressions, props and camera angle. I felt the second image would be a bit less valuable, but different enough that they’d be able to use in unique ways or to present a different message. Taking that and my previous experience pricing similar projects into consideration, I priced the first image at $7,000 and the second image at $5,000. I typically try to determine the licensing value for a single year first, and then extrapolate to account for additional years. However, while I might typically add 50% to jump from one year to two years, I felt that based on the simplicity of the concept and the likelihood of a limited shelf life to these images, that the price increase wasn’t justified. I also found out during conversation with the art buyer that their budget was around 50k, and I wanted to present appropriate fees while still keeping this in mind.

After determining what I felt was an appropriate fee, I checked other pricing resources to see what they suggested as well. While Blinkbid calculated a fee around $15,000, FotoQuote didn’t have a rate that included all advertising and collateral use while also taking into account trade and/or consumer usage. Getty suggests a price of $4,800 per image for print advertising, but didn’t have a catch-all collateral pricing rate or the option for specific trade usage. Corbis offers a “Print Ad, Collateral and Web Pack”, which seemed to fit the requested licensing nicely, and suggested a price close to $15,000 per image per year, but also didn’t include an option for trade usage.

The agency asked for an option to expand the licensing from trade to consumer use within a concurrent time frame, and I felt that this increase should fall somewhere in between an additional 50% to 100% of the fee, or at least be as valuable as 100% of the first hero shot. I settled on $7,500 to make it a palatable option, while also realizing the agency would have to take into account increased talent rates (which I developed with our casting director).

Photographer Scout Day: We planned to do a walkthrough of the location before the shoot, so I made sure to include pre-production time for the photographer to attend.

B-Roll Videographer and Video Equipment: While photography was definitely the main objective, the agency hoped to acquire video content as well during the shoot. The video was to mirror the photography but capture very subtle movement of the talent. Given the limited creative responsibilities, I felt $1,500 would cover a camera operator who could also offer grip and lighting expertise. I anticipated that the $1,000 would cover his camera, a basic slider and video monitors for the client to view the content they would be capturing.

First and Second Assistants: We’d need extra hands on site, not only to help set up and break down, but to also assist with moving furniture around and putting it back in place alongside the styling team.

Digital Tech: I anticipated a tech to charge $500/day and added $750 for a computer workstation and monitors for the client to review the images being captured.

Producer: This included three prep days, one scout day, one shoot day and one wrap day. With a crew this size and lengthy list of logistics to monitor, a producer would be a key role to take on those responsibilities.

Location Scout, Location Fee: Upon initial discussion regarding the creative direction, the client was looking for a pretty straightforward and simple residential property. Since most location scouts have plenty of residential properties that would fit this bill in their database, I included one day to account for a file pull, and one day to account for extra time they might need to spend shooting new pictures of the location we chose or to find additional options. In the area where the shoot would take place, and based on prior experience, I felt a location fee of $2,000 would return a solid list of options to choose from.

Production RV: When possible, I always try to include a production RV for shoots like this to keep as many cooks out of the kitchen as possible. An RV would afford a place for the stylists to set up, space for talent to wait, an area to arrange catering, and a private area with wifi for the client if needed. Many RVs charge $800-$900/day, but then mileage, dumping fees, generator run time and other charges are often added on which add up quickly. I included a buffer and bumped the rate to $1,200 to be safe.

Live Casting and Talent: The agency requested a live casting (rather than casting from cards) and wanted to capture video of each talent to see how they presented themselves and interacted with others. I contacted a local casting agency who quoted $950 to cover their prep time, a half day for the casting, delivery of the results and booking of two talent (the rate felt quite cheap from a print production perspective, but similar to rates I’ve seen other casting agencies quote that primarily cater to the video industry). I also discussed talent rates with the casting agent and determined that a fee of $3,000 per person would return a decent talent pool to choose from.

Hair/Makeup Stylist: Since the talent count was minimal, we included a hair/makeup stylist without an assistant for the day.

Wardrobe/Prop Styling: The wardrobe requested was rather straightforward, and after a conversation with a local stylist, we were confident that they needed just one assistant to accomplish the project. We included two prep days, one shoot day and one return day for both the stylist and their assistant. We anticipated that $350 per talent would be more than enough to cover non-returnable wardrobe, and that $1,650 would be a good starting point for extra props to fill out a room in a residential property (tables, chairs, other small pieces of furniture, flowers, picture frames, vases, etc). Since some of these items would be rather large, we included the cost of a van to help transport everything.

Equipment: At the time of estimating, we were debating whether it would make sense to shoot with strobes and then set up continuous lights for the video, or if we should just use the lighting setup for video and have the photographer just shoot without his strobes. Either way, I was confident that $1,500 would cover the photographer’s gear should he choose to use it, or it could be added to the $1,000 already included for the videographers gear to help supplement that to include a lighting setup.

Shoot Processing for Client Review and Selects Processed for Reproduction: We included $250 for the photographer to do a quick edit and provide a web gallery, while adding $100 per image to touch up the chosen files and deliver them to the agency. I’d typically increase the rate for the gallery to $500, but we’d have a digital tech on site to help organize the assets and accomplish some of this work as it was being captured.

Catering: I anticipated catering to cost $50-$60 per person for the shoot day (including six agency/client attendees), and bumped it up a bit to account for potential meals during the scout day.

Mileage, Parking, Meals, Misc.: I included $100 for production books, $200 for miscellaneous expenses and mileage, and $300 for additional meals and parking for the wardrobe/prop stylist while shopping and returning everything.

Feedback: While we knew that our estimate fell within their budget, we also sensed that they might be interested in increasing the scope of the project. Sure enough, the agency came back and told us that they were interested in shooting another scenario with two additional talent during the same shoot day, and they asked for a revised estimate. This of course impacted many items across the board, and we put pen to paper and submitted the following revised estimate:

Creative/Licensing: In addition to capturing another concept, they asked for licensing to six images (three per concept), as opposed to just two. My first inclination was to double the price, but upon further consideration, I felt that the first image of the second scenario might be equally if not less valuable than the second image from the first concept. I had considered adding an extra $3,750 for image number three and $1,500 for image number four, and felt that the third image in each scenario didn’t bring enough value to increase the fee much further. While we wanted to bump the price to this amount, the photographer was eager to close the deal and wanted to offer a bit of a discount by capping it at $15,000 (we did however increase the licensing option to jump from trade to consumer use). Given the nature of the project, we agreed that this was still good for a one-day shoot, and I’ve seen similar projects land on similar rates while granting more licensing.

Live Casting and Talent: Since we’d be casting four talent instead of two, we increased the casting fee to account for more time to prep, shoot and book talent, and we increased the talent fees to account for two additional people.

Wardrobe: This also increased, but didn’t double since the outfits that were requested could easily accommodate more than one talent. So, instead of shopping for four unique outfits, many of the same items would be appropriate for multiple talent which I anticipated would result in cost savings. Interestingly, while I would have anticipated an increase to the prop budget since we’d be shooting in two scenarios, we felt that after analyzing some location options, that we’d be able to use many of the items already in the houses to set up a simple second scenario.

Selects Processed for Reproduction: This was a quick change to jump from two to six images, and to cover the time it would take to process more images.

Catering: I added an extra $60 per person to account for the two additional talent.

Production Insurance: Throughout the negotiation process, we learned that the agency had insurance requirements that the photographer’s policy didn’t specifically cover. The photographer would need to increase his policy and pay an additional fee to his insurance company in order to do so, and hoped to pass this cost along to the agency.

Results: The project was awarded, and the client opted to expand the licensing to include consumer use.

If you have any questions, or if you need help estimating or producing a project, please give us a call at (610) 260-0200. We’re available to help with any and all pricing and negotiating needs—from small stock sales to big ad campaigns.

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Categories: Business

The Daily Edit – Narayan Mahon: ESPN

Tue, 01/26/2016 - 9:31am

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ESPN.com

Photo Editor:
Photographer: Narayan Mahon

Do you golf?
I have never golfed a day in my life. But I were to golf one day, it would definitely be on a frozen lake with lots of belly-warming booze and layers of wool.

What type of direction did you get from the magazine?
Don’t get frostbite. But there really was no direction from the magazine other than to shoot anything and everything and just to make a fun photo essay.

How often do you work with ESPN?
It varies, of course, but about five times a year.

What was the biggest challenge for this shoot?
Originally the weather was supposed to be cloudy all day but it turned out to be sunnier, so the snow on the lake was intensely bright. My plan was to shoot this with a ringflash but the snow-sun combo was all the fill light I needed. After that the biggest challenge was staying warm while standing on ice and snow for eight hours. My face was wind burned and my corneas burned from the brightness of the snow, which hurt for a couple of days after the shoot. The things you do for love!

Did you learn anything new that you think could transcend into future shoots?
I learned that I need a pair of insulated overalls! I should have learned that on the previous year’s snowy cross country skiing shoot for ESPN when I was waist deep in snow; but seriously, insulated overalls.

I know the tournament started because of freak storm several years ago; had you shot this before?
It’s a neat way for people to get outside, raise money for a charity and, apparently, because they are on the lake, open container laws don’t apply, so there’s a lot of drinking, for better or worse! But this was the first time I had photographed it.

When your face froze to the camera, how did you peel it off and what did you do to prevent that from happening again?
Well, I had a wool neck gaiter on, too, which I had pulled up over my mouth and nose, but then the viewfinder fogs up so quickly I can’t have it on while shooting. So I take it off for a second and then there’s condensation of the back of the camera and my nose would freeze to it every time, like a tongue on a flag pole! Just a quick pull-apart to detach myself was all that was needed… but no fun either way.

I know this started out as a print project and then got bumped to the web, did you have to do anything different for delivery or edit?
The edit was the same, it just meant delivering smaller files. I shot this medium format so the files were pretty robust for something just going online.

Did you find out about the change in plan after you turned in your edit?
Yeah, I found out after. It’s always a possibility; still just as heartbreaking, though.

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Categories: Business

The Daily Promo: Michael Scott Slosar

Mon, 01/25/2016 - 10:10am

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Michael Scott Slosar

Who printed it?
This specific promotional piece I had printed at Aosaimage.com  They do tons of amazing creative printing techniques.  My direct contact there is Mike Hill.  He is such an awesome guy!

Who designed it?
The design came from a collaboration of myself and Mike Hill.  We have worked on a few other creative printing processes in the past on some larger prints on wood and metal and had discussed ideas like this in the past.

Who edited it?
The images were edited and selected by me.  This was a personal series i had shot beach camping in San Onofre Camp Pendleton south of San Clemente, CA

How many did you make?
My goal with these pieces was to share something that was close to me, with people whose creative impact I respect and value. So, I only printed this as a limited series of 50 pieces.  All of which are hand signed and numbered.

How many times a year do you send out promos?
I have just begun to conceptualize more and more creative promotional series like this one for release in small personal runs.  In the past I have done more standard promos in bulk of 500-1,000 and sent out 3-5 times a year between LeBook shows and through direct mail.

How did this concept come about?
The concept behind this piece was to use materials that were natural to the environment of the images.  The burlap hand sewn sacks, the handmade and sanded drift wood box and the wood coasters.  I wanted something that people would want to have as decoration and consider a series of personal art released.  Im not trying to spam my promotional series out.  Moving forward, I want to continue creating promos that are intimate and close to my heart.  My goal with all my clients is to develop a working relationship on a more personal level.  My hopes are that this is felt and seen through this series.

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Categories: Business

Promos Of The Year 2015 – Postcard Special Mention

Fri, 01/22/2016 - 3:48pm

promooftheyear2015

This is how a promo is supposed to work. You open one and you are intrigued by the image so you go visit the photographers website. You really like what you see, so you file the promo away or tack it to your board, but then you head off to a meeting or go home for the day and immediately forget about the photographer.

Then the promos keep coming in (every month or two or three) and each time you are reminded how much you liked their work and each time you are enjoying the new image and then you begin to look forward to seeing the next one and then you start recognizing the envelopes when they come in. Eventually, you will hire them. This is how it is supposed to work and that why Sarah Wilmer deserves a special mention for sending promos in 2015.

 

Sarah Wilmer

https://www.instagram.com/sarahwilmersarahwilmer/

2015-03-06_1425676168

2015-03-06_1425676249

2015-03-20_1426866077

2015-03-20_1426866127

2015-03-20_1426866199

2015-07-22_1437585866

2015-07-22_1437585931

 

2015-09-04_1441392375

2015-09-04_1441392405

 

2015-12-16_1450283056

2015-12-16_1450283076

 

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Categories: Business

Promos Of The Year 2015 – Postcard

Fri, 01/22/2016 - 1:22pm

promooftheyear2015

The humble postcard is the ultimate promo. I believe it can carry as much weight as a book full of images and a poster that can block out the sun. It is a testament to your ability to produce a single (sometimes two) arresting image. For me the ultimate postcard image is beyond arresting. It has more questions than answers. It makes you want to dig a little deeper and figure out what this photographer is all about. See what’s really going on in that image that caught your attention. Here are the postcards that caught my eye in 2015:

 

Melissa Lyttle

https://www.instagram.com/melissalyttle/

 

2015-02-25_1424879812

 

Bailey Roberts

https://www.instagram.com/baileyrebeccaroberts/

2015-03-05_1425597719

 

Grady Mitchell

https://www.instagram.com/grvdy/

2015-03-09_1425940055

 

Kelsey Foster Wilson

https://www.instagram.com/kelseywilsonphoto/

2015-04-03_1428084048

 

Joe Toreno

https://www.instagram.com/joetoreno/

2015-05-05_1430862709

2015-05-05_1430862768

 

Ben McNutt

https://www.instagram.com/funbenmcnutt/

2015-05-29_1432916612

 

Allison Zaucha

https://www.instagram.com/allisonzaucha/

2015-06-09_1433890910

 

Janelle Jones

https://www.instagram.com/jnlljns/

2015-07-27_1438012726

2015-07-27_1438012765

 

Owen Photo

https://www.instagram.com/owenphotompls/

2015-07-28_1438123480

2015-07-28_1438123595

 

Ian Curcio

https://www.instagram.com/iancurcio/

2015-07-29_1438208942

 

 

Shana Novak

https://www.instagram.com/thenotsostilllife/

2015-08-05_1438789825

2015-08-05_1438789860

 

Bill Sallans

https://www.instagram.com/billsallans/

2015-08-31_1441042480

 

Michael Friberg

https://www.instagram.com/michaelfriberg/

2015-10-02_1443795257

 

Christopher Wray-McCann

https://www.instagram.com/wray_mccann/

2015-10-08_1444325982

 

Katherine Wolkoff

https://www.instagram.com/kwolkoff/

2015-10-22_1445553815

2015-10-22_1445553920

 

Callie Lipkin

https://www.instagram.com/clipkin/

2015-11-20_1448060134

 

Bradford Gregory

https://www.instagram.com/bradford_gregory/

2015-08-12_1439392663

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Categories: Business

Promos Of The Year 2015 – Envelope

Fri, 01/22/2016 - 12:32pm

promooftheyear2015

A great envelope makes my day. When I’m opening every single promo an envelope isn’t going to make a huge difference except it puts a smile on my face.

Sarah Lim

https://www.instagram.com/sarahlim/

2015-04-21_1429635439

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Anthony Georgis

https://www.instagram.com/anthonygeorgis/

2015-06-18_1434643658

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Categories: Business

Promos Of The Year 2015 – Postcards I Would Actually Use

Fri, 01/22/2016 - 11:31am

 

promooftheyear2015

Many of the postcard promos are actually postcards you could send out and sometimes you run across a set that you would actually send out. Here’s a set I just loved and kept.

Jennilee Marigomen

https://www.instagram.com/jennileem/

2015-02-06_1423235205

2015-02-06_1423235388

2015-02-06_1423235433

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Categories: Business

Promos Of The Year 2015 – Zine

Fri, 01/22/2016 - 9:49am

 

promooftheyear2015

I love zines. There really is an art to doing them well. The best seem to come from zine makers who happen to be photographers. Regardless, if you have a killer story to tell you can easily and cheaply make a zine about it, and those of us who have a passion for stories told through pictures will love it. Here are the zines that stood out in 2015:

Adam Jason Cohen

https://www.instagram.com/adamjasoncohen/

2015-06-09_1433863386

2015-06-09_1433863412

2015-06-09_1433863441

2015-06-09_1433863469

2015-06-09_1433863521

2015-06-09_1433863557

 

2015-06-19_1434738397

2015-06-19_1434738427

2015-06-19_1434738452

2015-06-19_1434738725

2015-06-19_1434738763

2015-06-19_1434741637

2015-06-19_1434741716

 

2015-07-20_1437426794

2015-07-20_1437426822

2015-07-20_1437426845

2015-07-20_1437426866

2015-07-20_1437426887

2015-07-20_1437426923

 

Aaron Turner

https://www.instagram.com/ilikevans1/

 

2015-08-12_1439391473

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2015-08-12_1439391527

2015-08-12_1439391550

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Wes Frazer

https://www.instagram.com/wesfrazer/

 

 

 

2015-08-17_1439836310

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Jaesung Lee

https://www.instagram.com/jaesungphoto/

 

2015-08-26_1440608353

2015-08-26_1440608418

2015-08-26_1440608452

2015-08-26_1440608502

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Aaron Farley

https://www.instagram.com/aaronfarley/

 

2015-10-22_1445548876

2015-10-22_1445548898

2015-10-22_1445549803

2015-10-22_1445550131

2015-10-22_1445550168

 

David Drake

https://www.instagram.com/davidndrake/

 

2015-11-10_1447187308

2015-11-10_1447187367

2015-11-10_1447187411

2015-11-10_1447187427

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KEENA

https://www.instagram.com/keenaphoto/

 

 

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2015-12-17_1450394194

2015-12-17_1450394212

2015-12-17_1450394548

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2015-12-17_1450394610

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Categories: Business

Promos Of The Year 2015 – Newsprint

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 3:02pm

promooftheyear2015

Newsprint is back! Of the 7 most common promo types I receive, newsprint promos are the most creative and exciting. I just love the feel and look of it, plus the enormous space creative photographers have available to work with. Here are the memorable newsprint promos from 2015:

Ruven Afanador

https://www.instagram.com/ruvenafanador/

2015-03-06_1425675292

2015-03-06_1425675428

2015-03-06_1425675501

 

Narayan Mahon

https://www.instagram.com/narayanmahon/

2015-03-18_1426701778

2015-03-18_1426701915

2015-03-18_1426701949

2015-03-18_1426701995

2015-03-18_1426702077

 

Dustin Aksland

https://www.instagram.com/dustinaksland/

 

2015-04-28_1430235061

2015-04-28_1430235088

2015-04-28_1430235147

2015-04-28_1430235360

2015-04-28_1430235399

 

Ricky Rhodes

https://www.instagram.com/rickyrhodes/

 

2015-04-28_1430246648

2015-04-28_1430246692

2015-04-28_1430246775

2015-04-28_1430246857

2015-04-28_1430246886

2015-04-28_1430246945

 

Farhad Samari

https://www.instagram.com/farhadsamari/

 

2015-06-09_1433867384

2015-06-09_1433867428

2015-06-09_1433867477

2015-06-09_1433867504

2015-06-09_1433867588

 

Trevor Ray Hart

https://www.instagram.com/trevorrayhart/

 

2015-06-12_1434134523

2015-06-12_1434134558

2015-06-12_1434134589

2015-06-12_1434134619

2015-06-12_1434134658

 

 

 

 

2015-06-30_1435690888

2015-06-30_1435690935

 

Troy House

https://www.instagram.com/troy_house/

 

2015-07-01_1435785099

2015-07-01_1435785127

2015-07-01_1435785185

2015-07-01_1435785230

2015-07-01_1435785271

2015-07-01_1435785330

2015-07-01_1435785374

 

Alex Farnum

https://www.instagram.com/afarnum/

 

2015-07-20_1437430566

2015-07-20_1437430620

2015-07-20_1437430663

2015-07-20_1437430688

2015-07-20_1437430707

2015-07-20_1437430732

2015-07-20_1437430769

2015-07-20_1437430811

 

Winnie Au

https://www.instagram.com/winniewow/

 

 

2015-07-28_1438116341

2015-07-28_1438116414

2015-07-28_1438116447

2015-07-28_1438116485

2015-07-28_1438116508

 

Embry Rucker

https://www.instagram.com/embryrucker/

 

 

2015-07-31_1438381519

2015-07-31_1438381547

2015-07-31_1438381570

2015-07-31_1438381741

2015-07-31_1438381766

2015-07-31_1438381828

 

Antonis Achilleos

https://www.instagram.com/antonisachilleos/

 

2015-08-27_1440708562

2015-08-27_1440708612

 

2015-08-27_1440708730

2015-08-27_1440708779

 

Eduardo Macarios

https://www.instagram.com/macarios/

 

2015-10-15_1444929183

2015-10-15_1444929222

2015-10-15_1444929255

2015-10-15_1444929551

2015-10-15_1444929582

2015-10-15_1444929609

2015-10-15_1444929649

 

Ramin Rahimian

https://www.instagram.com/raminrahimian/

 

2015-10-22_1445547947

2015-10-22_1445548017

2015-10-22_1445548053

2015-10-22_1445548082

2015-10-22_1445548139

2015-10-22_1445548158

2015-10-22_1445548181

 

Fab Fernandez

https://www.instagram.com/fabfernandez/

 

2015-10-27_1445963870

2015-10-27_1445963900

2015-10-27_1445963919

2015-10-27_1445963939

2015-10-27_1445963971

2015-10-27_1445964357

2015-10-27_1445964447

2015-10-27_1445964465

 

Narayan Mahon

https://www.instagram.com/narayanmahon/

 

2015-12-08_1449617737

2015-12-08_1449617758

2015-12-08_1449618398

2015-12-08_1449618418

2015-12-08_1449618454

------------------------

Visit our sponsor Photo Folio, providing websites to professional photographers for over 7 years. Featuring the only customizable template in the world.

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Categories: Business

Promos Of The Year 2015 – Concept Special Mention

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 2:05pm

promooftheyear2015

Not only are the pictures great in this promo the photographer doesn’t live in NY or LA and is proud of it. Love the map because many times you have to do research to figure out where they actually live.

Kenneth M. Ruggiano

https://www.instagram.com/kmruggiano/

2015-04-09_1428593759

2015-04-09_1428593808

2015-04-09_1428593839

2015-04-09_1428593901

2015-04-09_1428593968

------------------------

Visit our sponsor Photo Folio, providing websites to professional photographers for over 7 years. Featuring the only customizable template in the world.

------------------------

Categories: Business

Promos Of The Year 2015 – Motion

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 1:01pm

promooftheyear2015

A promo in the mail showing motion?! Yeah, I was pretty blown away when I got this promo in 2015:

Fedele Studio

https://www.instagram.com/fedelestudio/

2015-11-09_1447112032

2015-11-09_1447112159

2015-11-09_1447112189

2015-11-09_1447112491

2015-11-09_1447112514

2015-11-09_1447112534

2015-11-09_1447112586

------------------------

Visit our sponsor Photo Folio, providing websites to professional photographers for over 7 years. Featuring the only customizable template in the world.

------------------------

Categories: Business

Promos Of The Year 2015 – Pack Of Single Images

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 10:30am

promooftheyear2015

The pack of single image promos is probably the most useful and accessible promo there is for photographers. You don’t need a great designer, you can stick to your best images, there are plenty of printers available who do a great job with this and it’s fairly inexpensive compared to other promo types. Best of all, the recipient has a variety of images to choose from to save and remember you by. Here are the best I saw in 2015:

 

Brigitte Sire

https://www.instagram.com/bbbsire/

 

2015-01-13_1421167931

2015-01-13_1421167993

 

Sandra Salvas

https://www.instagram.com/sandrasalvas/

 

2015-01-14_1421279622

2015-01-14_1421279736

 

The Morrisons Theo + Theresa

https://www.instagram.com/_themorrisons_/

 

2015-02-19_1424361440

2015-02-19_1424361505

2015-02-19_1424361561

2015-02-19_1424361646

 

Joao Canziani

https://www.instagram.com/joaocanziani/

 

2015-02-20_1424452979

2015-02-20_1424453131

Ted Catanzaro

https://www.instagram.com/tedcatanzaro/

 

2015-03-11_1426089842

 

Joshua Harding

https://www.instagram.com/joshua_harding/

 

2015-04-23_1429821312

2015-04-23_1429821357

 

Frances F. Denny

https://www.instagram.com/francesfdenny/

 

2015-04-23_1429827049

 

Henry Busby

https://www.instagram.com/henrybusby/

 

2015-04-29_1430346876

2015-04-29_1430346920

Jeremy & Claire Weiss

https://www.instagram.com/day19/

 

 

2015-05-29_1432916078

 

Alex Thebez

https://www.instagram.com/alexthebez/

 

2015-05-29_1432935608

 

Bryan Jude

https://www.instagram.com/bryan_jude_/

 

2015-06-02_1433279476

 

Liz Kuball

https://www.instagram.com/lizkuball/

2015-06-22_1435005148

2015-06-22_1435005342

2015-06-22_1435005386

 

John Keatley

https://www.instagram.com/johnkeatley/

 

2015-07-09_1436458580

2015-07-09_1436458640

2015-07-09_1436458681

2015-07-09_1436458750

 

Diana King

https://www.instagram.com/dianawking/

 

 

2015-07-30_1438277372

 

HollenderX2

https://www.instagram.com/hollenderx2/

 

 

2015-07-30_1438278351

2015-07-30_1438278421

 

Erin Kornfeld & Erica Leone

https://www.instagram.com/erinanderica/

 

 

2015-07-30_1438287098

2015-07-30_1438287139

 

Dana Neibert

https://www.instagram.com/dananeibert/

2015-08-03_1438617410

2015-08-03_1438617434

2015-08-03_1438617484

 

Morgan Rachel Levy

https://www.instagram.com/morganrlevy/

 

2015-08-03_1438617929

2015-08-03_1438617979

 

Fab Fernandez

https://www.instagram.com/fabfernandez/

2015-08-24_1440453775

2015-08-24_1440453824

 

Daniel Ehrenworth

https://www.instagram.com/danielehrenworth/

 

2015-08-25_1440517330

2015-08-25_1440517373

2015-08-25_1440517424

Brendan Meadows

https://www.instagram.com/lionrind/

 

2015-09-11_1441997411

2015-09-11_1441997462

2015-09-11_1441997577

 

 

Eric Ogden

https://www.instagram.com/ogden3000/

2015-09-14_1442267695

2015-09-14_1442267710

2015-09-14_1442267780

 

Nathan Seabrook

https://www.instagram.com/sir_seabrook/

 

2015-09-18_1442612671

2015-09-18_1442612718

 

Jeremy Deputat

https://www.instagram.com/jeremydeputat/

2015-09-22_1442939853

2015-09-22_1442939908

 

Ray Lego

https://www.instagram.com/raylego/

 

2015-09-23_1443044195

2015-09-23_1443044262

2015-09-23_1443044306

 

Lucas Zarebinski

https://www.instagram.com/zarebinski_photo/

 

2015-09-24_1443111653

 

Grain Images

https://www.instagram.com/grainimages/

 

2015-09-29_1443559862

 

Chris Straley

https://www.instagram.com/chrisstraley/

 

2015-09-29_1443561397

2015-09-29_1443561490

 

Meredith Heuer

https://www.instagram.com/meredithheuerphotog/

 

 

2015-10-06_1444170526

 

Michael Cooper

https://www.instagram.com/cooperphotog/

 

2015-10-21_1445442711

 

Graham Pollack

https://www.instagram.com/grahampollackphoto/

 

2015-10-29_1446143101

 

JD White

https://www.instagram.com/jdwhitephoto/

 

2015-11-04_1446655038

2015-11-04_1446655093

 

Jason LeCras

https://www.instagram.com/jasonlecras/

2015-11-13_1447428330

2015-11-13_1447428387

 

Enrique Badulescu

https://www.instagram.com/enriquebadulescu/

2015-11-16_1447692990

2015-11-16_1447693044

2015-11-16_1447693081

 

Carles Carabi

https://www.instagram.com/carlescarabi/

 

2015-12-08_1449593741

2015-12-08_1449593771

2015-12-08_1449593793

2015-12-08_1449593833

 

Chris Crisman

https://www.instagram.com/crismanphoto/

 

 

 

2015-12-11_1449856728

2015-12-11_1449856769

 

Burcu Avsar DeSart

https://www.instagram.com/burcu_avsar/

 

2015-12-18_1450476231

2015-12-18_1450476258

------------------------

Visit our sponsor Photo Folio, providing websites to professional photographers for over 7 years. Featuring the only customizable template in the world.

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Categories: Business

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