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Equipment

Chipotle sued for $2.2b for allegedly using womans photo without permission

DPReview.com - Latest News - Mon, 01/09/2017 - 2:24pm

Mexican fast-food restaurant chain Chipotle is being sued for $2.2 billion by a customer who claims a photo of her has been used in advertising without her consent. According to the lawsuit, photographer Steve Adams took Leah Caldwell’s photo in mid-2006 while she was dining in a Denver area Chipotle restaurant. Caldwell claims she refused to sign Adams’ release form before leaving the restaurant, but that her refusal didn't stop Chipotle from using the photo in some promotional materials.

Both Adams and Chipotle CEO Steve Ells are named as defendants in the lawsuit. Caldwell states that she became aware of the photo’s usage in Chipotle promotional materials in December 2014 in Orlando, later seeing the photo in multiple California locations in 2015. She also claims the photo was edited to include alcoholic items on the dining table.

Chipotle has declined commenting on the pending litigation, but the lawsuit alleges that Chipotle bought and used the Adams’ photo without confirming whether Caldwell has signed a release. Due to the lengthy span of time that the photo was in circulation, the lawsuit is seeking a massive $2,237,633,000, the amount that Chipotle allegedly profited from the photo.

No doubt it's a reminder to photographers everywhere that getting models to sign a release form is an absolute must. Will Chipotle end up paying over $2 billion as a result of the oversight? It seems unlikely. Let us know what you think in the comments.

Source: The Denver Channel

Categories: Equipment

CES 2017 show highlights: from the weird to the (kind of) wonderful

DPReview.com - Latest News - Mon, 01/09/2017 - 1:45pm

CES 2017: Show highlights

This year's consumer electronics extravaganza in Las Vegas was the usual combination of the weird and wonderful, showcasing everything from a fish-finding underwater drone to Panasonic's flagship DC-GH5. DPReview was there - click through the slides above to see what we found. 

CES 2017: Show highlights

One of the first booths we stopped at was Canon's. Here, the company was showing off a range of technologies, including the 250MP APS-H format sensor that they've been wheeling out at various trade shows over the past year or so. Here you can see an 800mm lens attached to the sensor housing.

CES 2017: Show highlights

Just around the corner is another technology demo, but this one is a shipping product. The ME20F-SH was announced back in 2015, and made headlines for its ability to capture HD footage at equivalent ISO sensitivities up to 4 million, but it is now in the hands of filmmakers. At CES, Canon was showing off full-color sample footage of the African savannah shot in collaboration with a National Geographic filmcrew, and captured in almost complete darkness.

CES 2017: Show highlights

Back to consumer digital imaging, and Canon was also showcasing its newest compact camera, the PowerShot G9 X Mark II. Externally almost indistinguishable from its predeCESsor, the pocketable G9 X Mark II is much faster, especially in Raw mode. 

CES 2017: Show highlights

Meanwhile, just across the hall, Nikon was entertaining attendees with the return of 'Project Helix'. Now featuring 72 simultaneously-triggered Nikon D750 full-frame DSLRs and one KeyMission 360, Helix creates an interactive 360-degree image of whoever steps into the ring.

CES 2017: Show highlights

Here are some of the 72 Nikon D750s, and their companion 14-24mm F2.8 lenses. That's roughly a quarter of a million dollars' worth of gear, right there.

CES 2017: Show highlights

Considerably less expensive is the new Nikon D5600, launched last year in Europe and Asia, and officially announced in the USA at this year's CES. Boasting a 24MP sensor, 39-point AF system an redesigned body, the D5600 is an attractive beginners' DSLR.

CES 2017: Show highlights

Over to the Ricoh booth, where this show floor demo Pentax K-1 has had its magnesium alloy swapped for clear polycarbonate, to show off the camera's inner workings. 

CES 2017: Show highlights

Also on the Ricoh booth was an interesting technology demo showing what happens when the Theta 360 is hooked up to a Pentax K-1. While the 360 takes care of a low-resolution 360-degree image, the K-1 can capture a high-resolution image of a portion of the scene. The resulting multi-image file can be explored in the same way as a conventional Theta 360-image, with the addition of higher-resolution inserts.

Currently only a technology demonstration, We can imagine this being particularly useful for businesses, and real-estate photography.

CES 2017: Show highlights

This is Kodak's Super 8 video camera, which offers a hybrid of very old technology (super 8 film) with modern digital display and audio. The Super 8 camera features a digital live view display (albeit not a very good one) and digital audio recording, in a stylish body.

CES 2017: Show highlights

Much more modern is Panasonic's Lumix DC-GH5. Definitely the highest-profile camera release of CES 2017, the GH5 is a flagship Micro Four Thirds 4K stills/video camera which also incorporates a '6K photo' mode and a range of advanced stills photography features. 

CES 2017: Show highlights

Not exactly new, but a new look at least - this is the just-unveiled 'Graphite' edition of Fujifilm's X-Pro2, shipping soon with its matching 23mm F2 lens. 

CES 2017: Show highlights

Ambarella may not be a brand name that rolls off your tongue, but chances are pretty good you own their products since the company makes the cameras and SOCs that power some of the industry's most popular devices. We were really impressed by the Yi 4K action cam, which uses the company's new H2 SOC to deliver stunning 4K/60p video.

CES 2017: Show highlights

What happens when you arrange 128 Canon Rebels in a sphere? If you're Solidiphy, you sync them up, stitch the photos together, and send the results to a 3D printer. We gave it a try and will report back when we receive our Barney and Dale action figures.

CES 2017: Show highlights

Along with vinyl records, slide film, and 1980s video game consoles, instant prints are doing their part to drive the retro revolution. The Polaroid Pop brings back the classic 3.5 x 4.25" instant print format using ZINK Zero Ink printing technology. A representative told us the Pop should be available 'later in 2017.'

CES 2017: Show highlights

Speaking of retro... If you've been saying to yourself "Gee whiz, I sure do wish I had an old fashioned console TV on which to view my photos," your day has arrived thanks to Broksonic. It's actually a flat screen mounted in a console, but the analog spirit is there. If we get a review unit we'll order up a bunch of frozen TV dinners to give it a spin.

CES 2017: Show highlights

Sony didn't have any new gear to show off at CES 2017, but this tech was keeping himself busy repairing a6000-series bodies as part of Sony's Pro Support program.

CES 2017: Show highlights

Touch it. Touch the future.   

CES 2017: Show highlights

WE TAKE IT BACK - WE DON'T LIKE THE FUTURE!

CES 2017: Show highlights

If there was one product class that dominated this year's CES, it was drones. From the very big...

CES 2017: Show highlights

...to the very small...

CES 2017: Show highlights

...to the downright silly.

CES 2017: Show highlights

One of the most popular products of the show was a drone that doesn't even fly. The PowerVision PowerRay is an underwater drone with integrated 4K camera - perfect for filming your tropical adventures. (Note: mermaid not included.)

CES 2017: Show highlights

Not do be outdone by their own underwater drone, PowerVision also introduced the PowerEgg. It's a drone. Shaped like an egg. Because... eggs. Right? After all, who hasn't said to themselves, "I love drones, I just wish they were shaped like eggs?"

CES 2017: Show highlights

And yet, it's strangely cool and fun to fly!

And to think, we put a man on the moon... 

CES 2017: Show highlights

Speaking of which, NASA was raising the average IQ of its fellow exhibitors just a short distance away, with a couple of small robots in tow. This one, called 'Rovey' (we're not making that up) is a demonstrator used in schools and colleges. Loosely modeled on the Curiosity Rover, Rovey was obviously feeling the chill a little, over in the South Hall. Unfortunately, Rovey was nowhere near the BB-8 droid we saw rolling around, so chances for a robot romance were slim.

CES 2017: Show highlights

If VR is your thing, this Drone Volt aerial machine should be on your radar. It combines video from two separate GoPro Omni rigs (a total of 12 cameras) for a high quality VR experience that stitches the drone right out of the picture. Just don't crash it...

CES 2017: Show highlights

In the future, all cars will look like this. Apparently.

CES 2017: Show highlights

Ride it. Ride the future. 

Categories: Equipment

HMD Global releases Nokia 6 Android smartphone

DPReview.com - Latest News - Mon, 01/09/2017 - 1:43pm

HMD Global, the Finnish company that acquired the exclusive Nokia brand licensing rights for mobile phones in late 2016, has released its first model under the legendary Nokia moniker. The Nokia 6 is best described as an upper mid-range device with an unibody that is machined from a solid block of 6000 series aluminum and would not look out of place on a top-end smartphone. 

Images can be viewed and displayed on the 5.5” Full-HD IPS LCD display with 2.5D Gorilla Glass and the Android 7 Nougat OS is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon chipset and 4GB of RAM.  The device also features 64GB of expandable storage and dual amplifiers in combination with Dolby's Atmos surround technology should be capable of delivering excellent sound.

Juho Sarvikas, Chief Product Officer, HMD Global said: “We have set ourselves a mission to deliver the best possible smartphone experience, with a beautiful premium design touch, to everyone, at every price point. By building on true Nokia phone hallmarks of leading design and materials, an obsessive focus on the latest technology and solving real-life issues, we believe we have a unique proposition for consumers. The Nokia 6 marks the first step on our journey, with more to come in 2017.”

In the camera department the Nokia 6 packs a 16MP camera with 1.0 µm pixel size, F2.0 aperture and phase detection AF. The 8MP unit at the front also has an F2.0 aperture and at 1.12 µm slightly larger pixels. Both cameras can record 1080p video at 30 frames per second.

The Nokia 6 will, at least to start with, be exclusively available through JD.com in China and set you back approximately $245. On paper at least, the Nokia 6 looks like a very solid device at an attractive price point and a good first step for re-establishing the Nokia brand in the marketplace. That said, we are still hoping to see Nokia's rumored camera super-phone revealed at MWC at the end of February. 

Press Release:

HMD Global launches first smartphone, the Nokia 6 in China

  • Nokia 6 will be available exclusively in China through JD.com. Available in early 2017, Nokia 6 is 1699 CNY
  • New design philosophy embraces much-loved Nokia phone hallmarks of quality, superior craftsmanship and relentless focus on the consumer experience
  • Nokia 6 marks the first step for the Nokia brand into Android smartphones with more to come in H1 2017

Espoo, Finland – 8 January 2017: After securing the exclusive Nokia brand licensing rights in mobile phones in late 2016, HMD Global Oy (“HMD”) is proud to announce the launch of its Nokia 6 smartphone in China. The Nokia 6 marks the first step in HMD’s ambition to set a new standard in design, material quality and manufacturing innovation across every tier of its products by building on the hallmarks of a true Nokia phone experience. The device, which is designed explicitly with the needs of users in mind, combines quality and in-built durability to deliver a real-life premium smartphone experience at a price point for the highly aspirational Chinese consumer.

The decision by HMD to launch its first Android smartphone into China is a reflection of the desire to meet the real world needs of consumers in different markets around the world. With over 552 million smartphone users in China in 2016, a figure that is predicted to grow to more than 593 million users by 20171, it is a strategically important market where premium design and quality is highly valued by consumers.

With the arrival of Nokia 6, consumers will see superior craftsmanship and design quality in action. It takes 55 minutes to machine a single Nokia 6 from a solid block of 6000 series aluminium. It then receives two separate anodising processes, taking over ten hours to complete, with each phone being polished no less than five times. The end result is an aluminium unibody with the highest level of visual and structural quality.

Delivering quality to the core, the Nokia 6 display has a bright hybrid in-cell 5.5” screen with full HD resolution and incredible colour reproduction wrapped in 2.5D Gorilla Glass. The display stack is laminated together with a polarizer layer enabling excellent sunlight readability and slim form. The build is completed with the latest generation Qualcomm Snapdragon™ 430 processor with X6 LTE modem designed for excellent battery life and superior graphics performance.

The Nokia 6 has 4GB RAM and 64GB storage with which to run the latest version of Android Nougat and is packed with entertainment to bring to life the latest that Android has to offer. The dual amplifiers deliver a 6dB louder sound than a regular amp, giving higher voice, deeper bass and unmatched clarity. Dolby Atmos creates powerful, moving audio that seems to flow all around users. The Nokia 6 packs a 16MP phase detection auto focus rear camera for sharp detailed pictures, and an 8MP front camera. The f/2.0 aperture lenses and exclusive camera UI with automatic scene detection make it easy to take great shots every time.

Arto Nummela, CEO, HMD Global said: “Just a short while ago we announced the launch of HMD Global. From the outset we have stated that we intend to move with speed to establish a position as a player in the smartphone category and create products that truly meet consumer needs. The Nokia 6 is a result of listening to our consumers who desire a beautifully crafted handset with exceptional durability, entertainment and display features.

Our ambition is to deliver a premium product, which meets consumer needs at every price point, in every market. We start today, with our premium, high quality Nokia 6; built to deliver a fantastic core user experience for Chinese consumers. We look forward to unveiling further products in the first half of this year.”

Nestor Xu, Vice President Greater China, HMD Global said: “China is the largest and most competitive smartphone market in the world. It is no coincidence that we have chosen to bring our first Android device to China with a long-term partner. JD.com is known for its upwardly mobile customer base and it has for many years believed in the Nokia brand and sold millions of our products to Chinese customers. Launching our first smartphone device, in such a strategically important market, with JD.com a trusted online retailer marks a signal of intent.”

Juho Sarvikas, Chief Product Officer, HMD Global said: “We have set ourselves a mission to deliver the best possible smartphone experience, with a beautiful premium design touch, to everyone, at every price point. By building on true Nokia phone hallmarks of leading design and materials, an obsessive focus on the latest technology and solving real-life issues, we believe we have a unique proposition for consumers. The Nokia 6 marks the first step on our journey, with more to come in 2017.”

Shengli Hu, President of 3C Business Unit, JD.com, said: “The Nokia 6 marks a new milestone for the iconic brand, and JD.com is proud to work with HMD on this exclusive launch in China. Our 200 million active consumers come to JD.com to shop for guaranteed high-quality products from the world’s leading brands, and we are proud to provide a trusted outlet for them to reconnect with Nokia phones.”

Nokia 6 will debut exclusively through JD.com in early 2017 in China. Competitively priced for the aspirational smartphone user, the Nokia 6 is 1699 CNY at JD.com.

Categories: Equipment

SLT strikes back: Sony a99 II real-world sample gallery

DPReview.com - Latest News - Mon, 01/09/2017 - 7:00am
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A-mount has returned with the a99 II, this time armed with the 42MP BSI CMOS sensor from the a7r II, as well as some tricks of its own. We hit the streets to see how the added tech makes this SLT behave.

See our Sony a99 II
sample gallery

Categories: Equipment

Canon EF-M 18-150 F3.5-6.3 IS STM real-world sample gallery

DPReview.com - Latest News - Sun, 01/08/2017 - 6:00am
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The Canon EF-M 18-150mm F3.5-6.3 IS STM is a travel zoom for the company's mirrorless cameras. It's equivalent to 28.8-240mm when attached to an EF-M mount camera, such as the EOS M5 that we used for this gallery. Click the images above to open the gallery and see how the lens performed at the Disneyland Resort and beyond.

Categories: Equipment

CES 2017: Hands-on with Kodak Super 8

DPReview.com - Latest News - Sat, 01/07/2017 - 3:45pm

CES 2017: Hands-on with Kodak Super 8

First launched in 1965, Kodak's Super 8 format was one of the most influential developments in amateur filmmaking. And now it's back, with an all-new (kind of) camera. We headed to the Kodak booth earlier today to get our hands on one.

CES 2017: Hands-on with Kodak Super 8

The new Super 8 camera is truly a hybrid of the very old, and the very new. At its heart is a cartridge of 8mm film, totaling 50 feet in length. How many minutes of footage you can shoot depends on which frame-rate you select. The Super 8 camera can shoot at 18, 24, 25, or 36 fps. 

CES 2017: Hands-on with Kodak Super 8

The 'viewfinder' is a 3.5in LCD, which provides a live view image, via a split-prism behind the attached lens. Although a large flipping, tilting screen is definitely a huge improvement over classic all-analog Super 8 cameras of the past, the live view image is hazy, grainy, and hard to use as a means of judging critical focus. In other words - pretty familiar, if you've ever shot Super 8 before.

CES 2017: Hands-on with Kodak Super 8

The main control on the Super 8 camera is the circular 'wheel', shown here on the body, facing the flipped-out screen. It works rather like a second-generation iPod. The central button brings up a menu, and the touch-sensitive wheel allows you to navigate the settings by scrolling. The screen itself is not touch-sensitive.

CES 2017: Hands-on with Kodak Super 8

Super 8 cameras will be bundled with a manual focus Ricoh 6mm F1.2 prime lens (roughly equivalent to a 40mm F7 in 35mm terms) but the C-mount is compatible with a huge number of lenses stretching back decades.

CES 2017: Hands-on with Kodak Super 8

Here's that click wheel in action. The Super 8 is reasonably customizable. Many of the features that would have been managed with physical switches in the past (like frame rate) can be set in the camera's menus. As a result, the camera body is impressively clean and minimalist.

CES 2017: Hands-on with Kodak Super 8

The Super 8 is a true 'hybrid' device. While the film takes care of the images, sound can be recorded to an SD card, via an external microphone. Cartridges must be mailed back to Kodak for development, and the price (TBC) will include film development, scanning and uploading to the cloud.

CES 2017: Hands-on with Kodak Super 8

Oh yes - and Kodak has also promised to bring back Ektachrome! 

It feels a bit surreal to be covering the launch of new film products in 2017, especially from Kodak, but after using an almost production-ready sample of the Super 8 camera today we're actually pretty impressed by how well the company has married the analog and digital sides of the product. What do you think?

Categories: Equipment

CES 2017: hands-on with the Canon PowerShot G9 X II

DPReview.com - Latest News - Sat, 01/07/2017 - 4:00am

CES 2017: Hands-on with the Canon PowerShot G9 X II

We're at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada where Canon has taken the wraps off a new high-end compact camera: the PowerShot G9 X Mark II. We dropped by the Canon booth to take a closer look. 

CES 2017: Hands-on with the Canon PowerShot G9 X II

Externally, the G9 X Mark II looks a lot like the PowerShot Mark I. In fact, the two cameras are almost impossible to tell apart. Canon even forgot to add a 'II' to the name. The improvements are all internal. 

An upgraded Digic VII processor provides a major speed boost, enabling continuous shooting up to 8.2 fps (compared to 1fps in the original G9 X). Canon has also added Dual Sensing Image Stabilization, meaning that information from the lens and sensor is combined to offer a claimed 3.5 stops of image stabilization.

CES 2017: Hands-on with the Canon PowerShot G9 X II

The G9 X Mark II uses the same 20MP 1-inch sensor as its forebear, and the same 28-82mm equiv. F2-4.9 lens. Aside from the faster continuous shooting, other additions include greater customization options, improved AF tracking, better scene recognition in auto mode and in-camera Raw conversion.

CES 2017: Hands-on with the Canon PowerShot G9 X II

In terms of body size, the two cameras are identical, too, making the Mark II a highly attractive pocket compact, just like its predecessor.

This image gives a good indication of the G9 X Mark II's slim construction. When turned off (shown here) the body is a mere 31mm thick. 

CES 2017: Hands-on with the Canon PowerShot G9 X II

The GX9 II gets a bit bigger when it's powered up, but not much. Here you can also see the main control dial around the lens. This ring can be customized to serve various functions. By default, it controls the main exposure parameter (i.e., aperture, in Av mode). 

CES 2017: Hands-on with the Canon PowerShot G9 X II

The rear of the G9 X Mark II is dominated by a large touch-sensitive LCD, boasting 1.04 million dots. It's fixed, which keeps the camera nice and slim, but could mean that it's a bit harder to take selfies. 

CES 2017: Hands-on with the Canon PowerShot G9 X II

A tiny flash (gn 6) can be popped up manually for fill light and social photography. The G9 X Mark II is set to ship next month in your choice of black or silver, for $529. 

Categories: Equipment

DJI reportedly takes majority stake in Hasselblad

DPReview.com - Latest News - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 6:24pm

DJI is reported to have acquired a majority share in Hasselblad, according to an article posted January 4 on Luminous Landscape. We asked DJI's Corporate Communication Director of North America, Adam Lisberg, about the reports and he declined to comment. It's telling, however, that DJI isn't making an effort to deny the reports.

The initial report from LL, written by Kevin Raber, recounts the history of Hasselblad from the company's aerial beginnings to the announcement of the X1D system. Raber speculates that unexpectedly high demand for the X1D forced Hasselblad to look for funding to produce the camera. He says:

"Hasselblad still needed to stay afloat. The investors wanted their money and they were not willing to contribute any more to this cause. What now?

Simple, the minority shareholder becomes the majority shareholder. DJI now owns the majority share of Hasselblad. You heard me right. This information has come from numerous, reliable sources. Hasselblad, the iconic Swedish camera company, is now owned by the Chinese drone maker DJI. Sooner or later, this will all become public."

-
Kevin Raber, Luminous Landscape

You can read the entire article here

What does this mean for the future of Hasselblad? What kind of products could the two create together? Let us know what you think in the comments.

Categories: Equipment

Hawks Factory announces new 35mm F2 in M-mount

DPReview.com - Latest News - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 5:34pm

Japanese optical manufacturer Hawks Factory has released details of a new lens it has designed in homage to ‘old-style’ Leica M lenses. The Tsubasa Swallow 35mm F2 comes in a Leica M-mount and intends to produce images with a retro feel, according the company. It will display high resolution in the center of the frame and a soft blur at the edges when used wide open. Hawks Factory claims that the style of image the lens produces is something that ‘fascinates people all over the world’. 

The Tsubasa Swallow 35mm F2 is constructed using eight elements in six groups and features an iris created with 14 blades that closes to F16. The company says the glass and the polishing are Japanese, and that they designed their own helicoid for the focusing ring. The lens has an all-metal barrel that is said to be designed to withstand decades of use, but the company doesn’t specify whether the focusing mechanism is coupled to the camera’s rangefinder system or whether users will be expected to focus via Live View.

The lens is expected to be released for sale in February and, according to Leica Rumours, will be priced ¥198,000 (approx. $1800). For more information and some sample images see this translated version of the Hawks Factory website.

Categories: Equipment

Ambarella announces 8K-ready H3 SoC for drones and video cameras

DPReview.com - Latest News - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 3:24pm

Image processor maker Ambarella has released the H3 System-on-Chip (SoC) for high-end drones and video cameras, including those capturing 360-degree and virtual reality footage. The H3 supports 8K Ultra HD H.264/AVC video at 30 frames per second or multiple video streams with equivalent performance, for example 360-degree cameras that use dual 4K/60fps sensors. 

With the introduction of H3 we believe we provide the highest video performance and best image quality solution for high-end drones and multi-sensor video cameras,” said Fermi Wang, president and CEO of Ambarella. “H3 delivers 8Kp30 video performance to match the next generation of displays, such as 8K televisions and high resolution head-mounted displays.

The chip comes with a multi-channel ISP for 360-degree video capture and multi-sensor drone applications. 10-bit HDR processing should help deal with high-contrast scenes and Ambarella's electronic image stabilization should keep things steady, even in difficult conditions, such as high winds or when panning quickly. The chipset is powered by a quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU and an integrated hardware de-warping engine supports wide-angle panoramic camera designs and fish-eye lenses. Ambarella has not provided any information as to when the H3 is likely to make its appearance in consumer products, but it's good to see that in the near future there should be a range of capture devices capable of recording content for the latest 8K displays. 

Press Release:

Ambarella Introduces 8K Ultra HD SoCs for Virtual Reality and Drone Cameras

Ambarella H3 SoC delivers 8K Ultra HD at 30 frames per second and 4K Ultra HD at 120 frames per second

SANTA CLARA, Calif., January 5, 2017 -- Ambarella, Inc. (NASDAQ: AMBA), a leading developer of low-power, HD and Ultra HD video processing semiconductors, today introduced the H3 System-on-Chip (SoC) for high-end drones and a new generation of video cameras, including 360-degree and virtual reality cameras. The H3 video SoC enables 8K Ultra HD H.264/AVC video at 30 frames per second, as well as multiple video streams with equivalent performance, including 360-degree cameras with dual 4KP60 sensor video capture.

8K videos played on large 8K displays provide a better viewing experience to the end user, as pixels at this resolution are indistinguishable to the human eye at any reasonable distance. The combination of 8K video capture together with Ambarella’s advanced oversampling and image stabilization also enables higher video quality 4K video recording.

“With the introduction of H3 we believe we provide the highest video performance and best image quality solution for high-end drones and multi-sensor video cameras,” said Fermi Wang, president and CEO of Ambarella. “H3 delivers 8Kp30 video performance to match the next generation of displays, such as 8K televisions and high resolution head-mounted displays.”

H3 includes a powerful multi-channel ISP for 360 degree video capture and multi-sensor drone applications. Its 10-bit HEVC High Dynamic Range (HDR) video processing handles high contrast and wide color range scenes. It also features Ambarella’s advanced Electronic Image Stabilization (EIS), capable of generating a smooth 4Kp60 video output under challenging conditions, including during high winds and with high degrees of rotation. The integration of a quad-core ARM® Cortex®-A53 CPU with floating point and NEON™ provides significant processing power for customer applications including computer vision, wireless networking, and multi-sensor stitching algorithms. The H3’s hardware de-warping engine supports wide-angle panoramic camera designs and fish-eye lenses.

Ambarella will demonstrate the new H3 SoC at a private, invitation-only event held during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, January 5 – 8, 2017.

Categories: Equipment

Dell Canvas 27 launched as world's first 'horizontal smart workspace'

DPReview.com - Latest News - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 1:43pm

At CES 2017, Dell introduced what it claims is the world's first 'horizontal smart workspace,' the 27-inch touch-sensitive Dell Canvas display. Canvas is designed for creatives, including photographers, artists, and graphic designers, and can be used in two orientations: lying flat on a desk or propped up at an angle via a kickstand. The display likewise offers support for a stylus, totems (Dell's large control dials), and touch input.

Dell Canvas isn’t necessarily an alternative to Surface Studio; rather, it is a large display that can be connected to nearly any Windows 10 device, says Dell. The monitor has a 2560 x 1440 QHD resolution. The model will be available from Dell.com in the U.S. on March 30 starting at $1799.

Via: Dell

Categories: Equipment

CES Video: The Panasonic GH5

DPReview.com - Latest News - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 6:15am

One of the most anticipated cameras at CES is the Panasonic GH5, so it's no surprise that the company's booth was overrun, in part, by people wanting to see it in person. We met up with Panasonic's Matt Frazer, who walks through some highlights (and things he likes) on this new camera.

Categories: Equipment

Hands-on with new 'Graphite' Fujifilm X-T2 and X-Pro2 (and the XP120)

DPReview.com - Latest News - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 6:00am

Hands-on with new 'Graphite' Fujifilm X-T2 and X-Pro2 (and the XP120)

For the most part a glittering parade of the utterly unnecessary*, CES does occasionally throw up a gem for camera geeks. Last year it was Nikon's D500 and D5, and this year we're very taken with Fujifilm's new 'Graphite' editions of the X-T2 and X-Pro2. More specifically, the X-Pro2 is 'Graphite', while the X-T2 is offered in a lighter, shinier 'Graphite Silver'.

You've seen the cameras before, but not like this - click through for a closer look. 

*I saw something last night called a 'Smart Lawn'. I'm not kidding.

Hands-on with new 'Graphite' Fujifilm X-T2 and X-Pro2 (and the XP120)

The X-T2's new graphite silver finish is actually really nice. The gloss silver looks flashy without being gaudy. It will certainly attract more attention than the standard body but doesn't scream 'bling'. 

Hands-on with new 'Graphite' Fujifilm X-T2 and X-Pro2 (and the XP120)

According to Fujifilm, the new finish is achieved by layering three coats, over the magnesium-alloy shell. The first coat is matte black...

Hands-on with new 'Graphite' Fujifilm X-T2 and X-Pro2 (and the XP120)

...the second coat uses something that Fujifilm calls "Thin-film Multilayer Coating Technology" to apply the smooth silver finish... 

Hands-on with new 'Graphite' Fujifilm X-T2 and X-Pro2 (and the XP120)

...and the final coat is a clear varnish, for a glossy finish. The end result is very nice indeed, we think. 

Hands-on with new 'Graphite' Fujifilm X-T2 and X-Pro2 (and the XP120)

The graphite silver X-T2 will ship later this month, for $1799 body-only. That's $200 more than the standard X-T2.

Hands-on with new 'Graphite' Fujifilm X-T2 and X-Pro2 (and the XP120)

Not to be left out of the party, the X-Pro2 is getting a new color treatment, too. This time, it's just plain 'Graphite'. Darker and more subtle than the silver X-T2, the graphite X-Pro2 looks great. It's still glossy, but not ostentatious. 

Hands-on with new 'Graphite' Fujifilm X-T2 and X-Pro2 (and the XP120)

The Graphite X-Pro2 will be kitted with a special matching 23mm F2 R WR lens (not available separately). These pictures were taken under pretty rotten mixed hotel lighting, but hopefully you get the idea.  

Hands-on with new 'Graphite' Fujifilm X-T2 and X-Pro2 (and the XP120)

The graphite finish is also a multilayer coating, and according to Fujifilm the distinctive shade is achieved by increasing the amount of black pigment in the top coat. 

Hands-on with new 'Graphite' Fujifilm X-T2 and X-Pro2 (and the XP120)

The Graphite edition X-Pro2 kit will come with a dedicated LH-XF35-2 lens hood for the 23mm F2, in matching graphite finish (of course).

Hands-on with new 'Graphite' Fujifilm X-T2 and X-Pro2 (and the XP120)

In all functional respects, the Graphite X-Pro2 is precisely the same as the standard model that we reviewed here. The Graphite kit will be available later this month for $2,299.95, which is about $150 more than the standard camera and lens. 

Hands-on with new 'Graphite' Fujifilm X-T2 and X-Pro2 (and the XP120)

As well as the new graphite editions of the flagship X-series, Fujifilm also took the wraps off a new rugged camera, the XP120. 

The XP120 has a 16.4MP BSI-CMOS sensor and a 28-140mm lens, and is waterproof to 20m/65ft, shockproof to 1.8m/5.7ft and freezeproof to -10C/+14F.

Hands-on with new 'Graphite' Fujifilm X-T2 and X-Pro2 (and the XP120)

Other features include a 3" LCD, unique 'Cinemagraph' feature, which 'produces still photos with moving elements', 1080/60p video (with a wind filter) and Wi-Fi.

Hands-on with new 'Graphite' Fujifilm X-T2 and X-Pro2 (and the XP120)

The XP120 will come in four colors – blue, sky blue, green and yellow – and will be available in February for $229.

Categories: Equipment

CES Video: The Nikon D5600

DPReview.com - Latest News - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 6:00am
The Nikon D5600, originally announced for Europe and Asia, is now coming to North America. Backstage at CES, Nikon's Steve Heiner tells us a bit about the D5600, including the new, deeper hand grip.
Categories: Equipment

Take a look at a 380-shot mosaic of Apple’s new campus created with a 100MP Phase One camera

DPReview.com - Latest News - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 4:00am

A composite of 380 100MP aerial images has been created of the site of Apple’s new campus by photo mapping and data company SkyIMD. The company usually provides the kit for other aerial photographers to use, but on this occasion wanted to show off the amount of detail that can be captured with a Phase One iXU RS1000 100MP aerial camera. The company used software to create flight paths over the 0.5 square mile construction site and spent just thirty minutes shooting 420 images with the camera attached to a Cessna 172 light aircraft.

When combined to create a single picture of the whole area, the images allow dramatic magnification so that people in the scene can be picked out – even though the plane was flying at 2000ft with a lens just longer than standard for the format.

The Phase One iXU RS1000 industrial camera uses the same CMOS sensor that is used in the IQ3 100 back for the XF 645-style DSLR body, but in this case it is used in a body with no moving parts. The firm used a Rodenstock 90mm lens with the body and once all 420 images were combined and cropped to the equivalent of 380 images, the file measured 4.76GB. SkyIMD used Photoshop’s Photomerge feature to combine the images, but to maintain manageable amounts of data the company divided the images into batches of over 70 covering specific areas of the site. Once the batches were combined those composites were also combined to create the final image, which you can see on the SkyIMD website.

SkyIMD’s Michael Estigoy has provided some detail about how the image was shot and created.

All of the images were captured using our FAA/EASA/ANAC STC certified Aerial Camera Platform. The platform mounts to the strut of a plane (Cessna) and holds the PhaseOne iXU RS1000 90mm camera in a vertical (nadir) position.

During the pre-flight process, we used a software program called Flight Planner from AeroScientific (http://www.aerosci.info/flightplanner/) to create our flight paths, and calculate the frequency of the intervalometer based on the speed, altitude and desired GSD (ground sample distance).

Using the PhaseOne iX Capture Software, we set the exposure and ISO to obtain the best image balance we could. There was some consideration given to capture as much detail as possible - balancing the exposure between not making the shadows too dark and whites/brights too blown out.

We loaded up the flight plan on our iPad - we use an application called Galileo Offline Maps (https://galileo-app.com/) - to depict the flight lines and line up our airplane. Our pilot, who has years of experience flying missions like this, lined up the plane at the speed and altitude we calculated pre-flight, and then flew the lines straight and level. I controlled the camera operation and made sure that the image quality and coverage was being captured successfully.

The parcel required us to fly 7 flight lines to capture the imagery. We flew one grid.
We are planning follow up flights and will fly a double grid pattern on those, or a cross hatch pattern, to capture more images and enable us to create better mosaics and perhaps a 3D model or flyover.

Stitching and imaging process
We typically use photogrammetry software such as those offered by Pix4D and Agisoft. However, this time I elected to try and use Adobe Photoshop to create the Mosaic. I used the Photomerge function.

We had a total of 420 images. We have a high-powered computer (8 core i7, 64GB RAM, m.2 SSD drives, etc., GeForce GTX video card), but 420 is almost impossible to process all at once. I grouped the images into six separate folders, each representing an area of parcel. Each group shared some images with the other groups in order to facilitate matching. After each group, or chunk, of images was merged, I corrected them for distortion and then merged the groups together. After merging, any major flaws were cut out and images were sourced to fill in the holes.

Photoshop used 90% of our installed RAM and approx. 700 GB of scratch disk space on two m.2 SSD drives to complete each group, including the final mosaic.

As mentioned on our site, we did not take any time to massage the resulting mosaic Photoshop produced. I may have adjusted curves, performed some slight sharpening, and that's about it. There are obvious mis-alignments and distortions in the image. We wanted to share the image rather than spend another week making it perfect.

The final image was cropped to the final size. I had seen the plans Apple submitted to the City of Cupertino and wanted to try and represent that area of view (pages 3 & 4 of this PDF - https://s3.amazonaws.com/apple-campus2-project/Site_Plan1_Submittal7.pdf). The crop was made visually. We eliminated the use of about 40 photos, hence the approx 380 images mentioned on our site.

The image was too large for TIFF or JPG format so it was saved as a Photoshop Large Document (.PSB). In order to support the zooming feature on our web, we used a photoshop plugin from Microsoft:
http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/redmond/groups/ivm/HDView/HDPhotoshopPlugin.htm. This created the thousands of tiles for zooming.

I used Openseadragon for the javascript/web enablement for the zoom/interactive viewer:http://openseadragon.github.io/

Categories: Equipment

Steadicam launches Kickstarter campaign for motorized smartphone stabilization rig

DPReview.com - Latest News - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 3:30am

Camera stabilization system manufacturer Steadicam is hoping to introduce a new motorized rig for smartphone videographers called the Steadicam Volt. The new device is designed to accept a wide range of smartphones via an adjustable clamp and weights, and uses a battery-powered gyro that offers modes for shooting sport and for movie-making. The company says the rechargeable lithium-ion battery has a life of eight hours, and that the rig can still be used in manual mode when the battery is flat.

The Volt folds for storage, and offers Bluetooth and USB connectivity for updates and for working with the app that lets the device know which phone is in use. The company intends to fund the development of the Volt via a Kickstarter campaign and is seeking $100,000 to start production.

The Steadicam Volt has a projected retail price of $200, but early pledgers can reserve one for $119. If the campaign is successful the company says it will begin shipping in June.
For more information see the Steadicam website and the Steadicam Volt Kickstarter page.

Press Release


STEADICAM VOLT; 3- AXIS MOTORIZED SMARTPHONE CAMERA STABILIZER


Steadicam, a division of The Tiffen Company, will soon be releasing the Steadicam Volt, a 3-axis motorized smartphone camera stabilizer. As the first in its class to offer the user complete control of image framing and composition, the Volt serves as a versatile tool for content creation, easily operated by a wide range of users. With the Steadicam Volt, consumers will have the opportunity to capture outstanding Steadicam quality video right from their smartphone.

Product Benefits:
• Lightweight and folding design enable easy storage and transportation
• Accompanying iOS APP allows for precise balance and tuning
• Haptic control utilizes Simulated Inertia™ Dual operating modes for beginners and experienced users
• Uses long life rechargeable Lithium Ion batteries
• Accommodates phone sizes with or without case from 100 – 200g in weight and 58 to 80mm wide
• Bluetooth enabled
Engineered to provide the utmost precision and control, the Steadicam Volt will enable smartphone users to capture high quality video content with ease.
Additionally, the simulated feeling of inertia on the pan axis will improve the overall handing of the gimbal, giving users the stability they need to film with remarkable precision.

Categories: Equipment

Dell's 8K monitor goes on sale in March for $5000

DPReview.com - Latest News - Thu, 01/05/2017 - 6:44pm

Ready for 8K? Dell's UltraSharp 32" 8K monitor will be the first of its kind to reach the masses when it goes on sale in March. It packs in 33.2MP of resolution (280 ppi) and provides 100% Adobe RGB and sRGB color gamut. If that sounds enticing, you might want to start saving: it'll start at $4999 when it goes on sale March 23rd. 

A thin 9.7mm bezel keeps it looking sleek, and the monitor offers two Displayport 3.1 connections and four USB 3.0 ports. Dell's product information claims the monitor displays 1.07 billion colors, and lists an X-Rite color checker as 'optional hardware,' but we're pretty sure you'd want to throw one of those in too.

PCWorld points out that just because you can buy an 8K monitor doesn't mean you should pull the trigger just yet. They suggest waiting until GPUs can keep up, which will likely be later this year.

So are you ready to shell out $5000 for 8K, or will you wait a while? Let us know in the comments.

Categories: Equipment

CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600

DPReview.com - Latest News - Thu, 01/05/2017 - 3:47pm

CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600

The D5600 was originally announced in Europe and Asia late last year, but now - surprise surprise - it's coming to the USA. The D5600 sports a slimmed-down body compared to the D5500. We got our hands on it at CES.

CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600

In terms of specs, the D5600 offers only minor improvements over the D5500, but that's not a bad thing. The D5500 was a very fully-featured, enjoyable camera to use. Key features include a 24MP APS-C format sensor, and 39-point phase-detection autofocus system. ISO sensitivity spans 100-25600 and the D5600 can shoot at a maximum frame-rate of 5 fps.

CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600

The D5600 lacks a front control dial (you'll have to save up for a 7000-series body for that) but the rear control dial is large and well-placed for operation with your thumb. Control layout is typical Nikon, with a large exposure mode dial to the right of the pentaprism hump, and a toggle-style live view selection lever. 

CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600

The built-in flash is operated with a button just above the lens release, and when the flash is popped-up, this button doubles as a flash exposure compensation control, in concert with the rear control dial. This view also shows labeling for the D5600's built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth features. The addition of Nikon's 'Snapbridge' suite is one of the few additional features compared to the D5500. 

CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600

One of the major selling points of the D5000-series has always been the relatively small, lightweight camera bodies. The D5600 takes things even further in this direction, with a significantly downsized, monocoque body shell. 

CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600

It's hard to really appreciate from looking at a picture, but the D5600 feels almost incredibly slim when compared to previous D5000-series DSLRs. The deeper grip and thinner body make a real difference to handling. I was reminded of the experience of picking up a D750 for the first time and comparing it to a D700.

CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600

This image shows off the D5600's deep grip to good effect. The depth of the lens throat is fixed, but the body around it has been slimmed-down considerably. 

CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600

The D5600 offers a conventional rear control layout, with most buttons arranged to the right of the large 3.2" LCD screen. The screen itself is touch-sensitive, and offers a resolution of 1.04 million dots. The ability to quickly scrub through images by touch is a nice addition, inherited from the pro-grade D500.

CES 2017: Hands-on with Nikon D5600

The D5000-series is the only place in Nikon's DSLR lineup where you'll find fully-articulated rear LCD screens, as befitting their role as hybrid stills and video cameras. Although the D5600 isn't 4K-capable, its HD video feature set is solid, and well-suited to beginners and occasional videographers. HD footage can be captured at up to 60p.

The D5600 will be sold in several kits. It will be available body-only for $699, with the AF-P 18-55mm F3.5-5.6G lens for $799, with the 18-140mm F3.5-5.6G lens for $1199, and with the AF-P 18-55 and non-VR AF-P 70-300mm F4.5-6.3G lenses for $1149. All of these kits will be available this month.

Categories: Equipment

Analog revival? Increase in film sales spurs Kodak to bring back Ektachrome

DPReview.com - Latest News - Thu, 01/05/2017 - 3:22pm
A box of Ektachrome. Photo via Wikimedia commons

The list of discontinued film stocks is lengthy and after Kodak pulled the plug on our beloved Kodachrome, it seemed like any film could be next on the chopping block. But perhaps those dark days are behind us because today Kodak announced the company will be bringing back a different film stock: Ektachrome.

Discontinued in 2012, Kodak's decision to raise it from the dead is directly related to a recent increase in demand for analog film. Yep, you read that right. So does this mean that film photography is about to start down a similar path of revival as we've seen from vinyl records, which are currently selling at a 25 year high? We sure wouldn't mind.

From the Kodak announcement:

“Sales of professional photographic films have been steadily rising over the last few years, with professionals and enthusiasts rediscovering the artistic control offered by manual processes and the creative satisfaction of a physical end product. The reintroduction of one of the most iconic films is supported by the growing popularity of analog photography and a resurgence in shooting film. Resurgence in the popularity of analog photography has created demand for new and old film products alike.”

Ektachrome is a color reversal film and was first developed in the 1940's. Used for decades by National Geographic photographers, it's been long favored it due to its fine grain and excellent color reproduction.

So come the end of 2017, you'll once again be able to pick up a 35mm roll of it. And you've likely got a bearded, glasses-wearing hipster with a turntable to thank for that.

What do you think of the prospect of an analog revival? Let us know in the comments.

Kodak Brings Back a Classic with EKTACHROME Film

Las Vegas, NV, Thursday, January 05, 2017 --

To the delight of film enthusiasts across the globe, Eastman Kodak Company today announced plans to bring back one of its most iconic film stocks. Over the next 12 months, Kodak will be working to reformulate and manufacture KODAK EKTACHROME Film for both motion picture and still photography applications. Initial availability is expected in the fourth quarter of 2017.

KODAK EKTACHROME Film has a distinctive look that was the choice for generations of cinematographers before it was discontinued in 2012. The film is known for its extremely fine grain, clean colors, great tones and contrasts.

“It is such a privilege to reintroduce KODAK EKTRACHROME Film to the cinematography community,” said Steven Overman, Kodak’s chief marketing officer and president of the Consumer and Film Division. “We are seeing a broad resurgence of excitement about capturing images on film. Kodak is committed to continuing to manufacture film as an irreplaceable medium for image creators to capture their artistic vision. We are proud to help bring back this classic.”

Kodak will produce EKTACHROME at its film factory in Rochester, N.Y., and will market and distribute the Super 8 motion picture film version of EKTACHROME Film directly.

Kodak Alaris, an independent company since 2013, also plans to offer a still format KODAK PROFESSIONAL EKTACHROME Film for photographers in 135-36x format. KODAK PROFESSIONAL EKTACHROME Film is a color positive film, also known as “reversal,” “slide,” or “transparency” film. Unlike all of the other KODAK PROFESSIONAL Films available today, which are color negative films, EKTACHROME generates a positive image that can be viewed or projected once it is exposed and processed. This makes it ideal for high-resolution projection or presentations. It is also well suited for scanning and printing onto a range of professional-grade photographic media. Availability is expected in the fourth quarter of 2017.

Categories: Equipment

Enlaps Tikee time-lapse camera packs two lenses and a solar panel

DPReview.com - Latest News - Thu, 01/05/2017 - 2:38pm

Tikee by French company Enlaps aims to simplify time-lapse photography by combining a 4.5W solar panel, wireless connectivity and a pair of lenses into a single capture device. The device itself is described as completely self-sufficient, weatherproof and accessible via a Web application.

The idea behind Enlaps is that long duration time-lapse photography can be difficult depending on location due to potential power source and weather issues. Tikee and its more sophisticated counterpart, Tikee Pro, solve this by providing everything necessary for time-lapse photography in a single wireless and weatherproof product.

The small solar panel powers Tikee, assuming it is placed somewhere with sufficient sunlight, while a pair of lenses capture 220-degree panoramic images. A related Web application is available from a computer or mobile device; it automatically stitches the images into a time-lapse, and includes features for ‘advanced users' like Pan & Zoom and Time Period. Content is stored on a microSD card.

The Enlaps Tikee features Bluetooth LE and Wi-Fi, and saves content in JPEG format, while the Tikee Pro includes those features as well as GPS, GSM support, and both JPEG and Raw file format options. Both products were launched on Indiegogo, where the campaign has successfully resolved with €238,687 in funding. The company is demonstrating the devices at CES 2017.

According to TechCrunch, the Tikee will be priced at $750 and the Tikee Pro at $900 and will be available in April.

Via: TechCrunch

Categories: Equipment

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